Surgical Intuition; What It Is and how to Get It / Edition 1

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Overview

No algorithm, no "consensus statement," and no "standard of care" will help you now! You need intuitive type thinking, not analytical thinking. This book explores how to get it. Surgical Intuition offers a guided tour to becoming an expert, intuitive thinker. It is intended not only for general surgeons, but for family practitioners, primary care internists, and doctors of all specialties, as well as psychologists and cognitive scientists, because it shows that the possibilities and complexities of expert intuition are relevant to all fields of endeavor. The book sketches a full cognitive psychology theory of the thinking involved in expert surgery, and thus provides a description and an explanation of surgical intuition.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: David L. Nahrwold, MD (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: This is a book about how surgeons think, how they process information, and how they use intuition in the diagnosis and management of patients. The chapter headings accurately describe the book's contents: intuition, the doctor's task and mind, the structure of knowledge, problem solving, diagnosis, decision making, judgment, and visual thinking. The authors describe what is known about intuitive thinking (judgment) and contrast it with analytical thinking (data analysis). They believe "surgical scripts," in which experienced surgeons describe how they manage clinical situations, is a good model for the education of students and residents.
Purpose: The authors point out that computers, practice guidelines, algorithms, and other aids are often not helpful in caring for the individual patient, but that surgeons who use intuitive thinking make accurate, sound judgments. They attempt to describe intuition and its applications to patient care. This is an important exercise because if the manner in which physicians think and make judgments can be codified, this knowledge could be applied in the education of students and residents, perhaps making them better clinicians.
Audience: Their audience is surgeons, other specialists, psychologists, and cognitive scientists, but the information is of some value to all educators. Dr. Abernathy, a surgeon, died when the book was completed and Dr. Hamm, a PhD in academic family medicine, writes eloquently of Dr. Abernathy's many ideas, conventional and unconventional.
Features: The references are adequate, as are the illustrations. The table of contents is excellent. Each chapter is preceded by its subject headings, a useful feature for browsing.
Assessment: Coverage of the various elements of surgical thinking and judgment is thorough. One gets a feel for what judgment is, but it is difficult to understand it entirely. The book is not highly organized and one chapter does not necessarily flow into another. The authors' distaste for practice guidelines, protocols, and other such staples of modern patient management is evident. This is an interesting, but not essential, book.
From The Critics
Reviewer: David L. Nahrwold, MD (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: This is a book about how surgeons think, how they process information, and how they use intuition in the diagnosis and management of patients. The chapter headings accurately describe the book's contents: intuition, the doctor's task and mind, the structure of knowledge, problem solving, diagnosis, decision making, judgment, and visual thinking. The authors describe what is known about intuitive thinking (judgment) and contrast it with analytical thinking (data analysis). They believe "surgical scripts," in which experienced surgeons describe how they manage clinical situations, is a good model for the education of students and residents.
Purpose: The authors point out that computers, practice guidelines, algorithms, and other aids are often not helpful in caring for the individual patient, but that surgeons who use intuitive thinking make accurate, sound judgments. They attempt to describe intuition and its applications to patient care. This is an important exercise because if the manner in which physicians think and make judgments can be codified, this knowledge could be applied in the education of students and residents, perhaps making them better clinicians.
Audience: Their audience is surgeons, other specialists, psychologists, and cognitive scientists, but the information is of some value to all educators. Dr. Abernathy, a surgeon, died when the book was completed and Dr. Hamm, a PhD in academic family medicine, writes eloquently of Dr. Abernathy's many ideas, conventional and unconventional.
Features: The references are adequate, as are the illustrations. The table of contents is excellent. Each chapter is preceded by its subject headings, a useful feature for browsing.
Assessment: Coverage of the various elements of surgical thinking and judgment is thorough. One gets a feel for what judgment is, but it is difficult to understand it entirely. The book is not highly organized and one chapter does not necessarily flow into another. The authors' distaste for practice guidelines, protocols, and other such staples of modern patient management is evident. This is an interesting, but not essential, book.
David L. Nahrwold
This is a book about how surgeons think, how they process information, and how they use intuition in the diagnosis and management of patients. The chapter headings accurately describe the book's contents: intuition, the doctor's task and mind, the structure of knowledge, problem solving, diagnosis, decision making, judgment, and visual thinking. The authors describe what is known about intuitive thinking (judgment) and contrast it with analytical thinking (data analysis). They believe surgical scripts, in which experienced surgeons describe how they manage clinical situations, is a good model for the education of students and residents. The authors point out that computers, practice guidelines, algorithms, and other aids are often not helpful in caring for the individual patient, but that surgeons who use intuitive thinking make accurate, sound judgments. They attempt to describe intuition and its applications to patient care. This is an important exercise because if the manner in which physicians think and make judgments can be codified, this knowledge could be applied in the education of students and residents, perhaps making them better clinicians. Their audience is surgeons, other specialists, psychologists, and cognitive scientists, but the information is of some value to all educators. Dr. Abernathy, a surgeon, died when the book was completed and Dr. Hamm, a PhD in academic family medicine, writes eloquently of Dr. Abernathy's many ideas, conventional and unconventional. The references are adequate, as are the illustrations. The table of contents is excellent. Each chapter is preceded by its subject headings, a useful feature for browsing. Coverage of the various elementsof surgical thinking and judgment is thorough. One gets a feel for what judgment is, but it is difficult to understand it entirely. The book is not highly organized and one chapter does not necessarily flow into another. The authors' distaste for practice guidelines, protocols, and other such staples of modern patient management is evident. This is an interesting, but not essential, book.
Booknews
Sketches a cognitive psychology theory of the thinking involved in surgery, for general surgeons and doctors of all specialties, as well as psychologists and cognitive scientists. Beginning from the assumption that intuition is as important in surgery as analytical thinking, the authors describe various types and theories of thinking and problem solving, and present their model of surgical scripts as learning aids and as windows into how surgeons acquire experience. Includes numerous charts and puzzles. Distributed by Mosby. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

2 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781560530596
  • Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
  • Publication date: 1/28/1995
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 436

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Why a Book About Surgical Intuition? 1
Ch. 2 Intuition as a Mode of Thought in Surgery 17
Ch. 3 The Doctor's Task and the Mind that Accomplishes It 69
Ch. 4 Surgical Scripts: The Structure of Knowledge 93
Ch. 5 Problem Solving: Higher Order Thinking in Medicine 129
Ch. 6 Diagnosis: The Problem of "What Is" 157
Ch. 7 Decision Making: The Problem of "What to Do" 175
Ch. 8 Judgment 215
Ch. 9 Restructuring and Discovery 255
Ch. 10 In the Mind's Eye: Visual-Thinking in Surgery 289
Ch. 11 Scripts are the Foundation of Surgical Education 329
Ch. 12 Epilogue: Unfinished Business 411
Index of Exhibits 419
Index 425
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