A Survey of the New Testament: 4th Edition / Edition 4

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Overview

The 4th edition of this widely used guide to reading and interpreting the New Testament

This revised edition of Gundry’s survey of the New Testament goes beyond providing background information and technical introductory material and leads students to read the New Testament itself. Whenever possible general questions of introduction and background are tied to assigned readings covering the entire New Testament. In addition, comments on these readings help students with interpretation and follow the flow of thought from one passage to another.

Features include:
* New design with four-color format and more photos and improved maps
* Chapters begin with list, of study goals and end with summary, overview and of people, places, terms to remember, and review questions
* Outlines, section headings, subheadings, and bolded items make it easy to follow structure of discussion
* Phonetic pronunciations for unfamiliar names and terms
* Breakouts with illustrative quotes from ancient, nonbiblical literature
* Discussion questions on the contemporary relevance of the New Testament
* Updated bibliographies
* Conservative evangelical theological perspective also notes other positions and literature

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
'“Professor Gundry’s 4th edition continues to be the preferred textbook for an undergraduate New Testament survey course. Gundry’s ‘Further Discussion’ recommendations at the end of each chapter have facilitated many lively discussions in the classroom. A wonderful feature of this textbook is the ‘How Much Did You Learn?’ questions, which I require students to answer in a notebook, along with keeping key definitions from the textbook. With the new images and maps, this new edition will continue to guide undergraduate students through the strange world of first century Palestine for many generations to come. I recommend its use wholeheartedly.” Spring Arbor University -- Brian Lugioyo

“I have found the 4th edition of Robert Gundry’s A Survey of the New Testament to be an excellent text and resource for classroom use in my New Testament courses. Several features contribute to its usefulness. Let me highlight two. First, the pictures, maps, charts and graphs combine to enhance the students learning. These visual aids bring the New Testament to life. Second, the chapters themselves are well written. This allows the student to gain a firm grasp of the content of the New Testament. I am grateful to have at my disposal a resource like Gundry’s 4th edition.'' Boyce College -- Shawn Buice

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780310238256
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication date: 7/1/2003
  • Edition description: New
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 560
  • Sales rank: 278,369
  • Product dimensions: 7.63 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert H. Gundry (PhD, Manchester) is a scholar-in-residence and professor emeritus of New Testament and Greek at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. Among his books are Mark: A Commentary on His Apology for the Cross; Matthew: A Commentary on His Handbook for a Mixed Church Under Persecution, Soma in Biblical Theology, and Jesus the Word According to John the Sectarian.
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Read an Excerpt

A Survey of the New Testament


By Robert Horton Gundry

Zondervan

Copyright © 2003 Robert H. Gundry
All right reserved.


Chapter One

INTERTESTAMENTAL AND NEW TESTAMENT HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

Overview:

The Greek Period and Preliminaries

The Maccabean Period

The Roman Period

Summary

Study Goals-Learn:

What political events took place in the Middle East from the end of the Old Testament period through the intertestamental and New Testament periods

How the Jews fared

What cultural developments took place

What religious questions arose out of the political events and cultural developments

What factions the political events, cultural developments, and religious questions produced among Jews

Who the leaders were in these developments and what they contributed to the sweep of this history

The Greek Period and Preliminaries

From the Old Testament to Alexander the Great

In Old Testament times the kings Saul, David, and Solomon ruled over all twelve tribes of Israel. Then the nation split into the ten-tribe northern kingdom of Israel and the southern kingdom of Judah, with the tribe of Benjamin absorbed into the tribe of Judah. The Assyrians conquered the northern kingdom and took most of its inhabitants as exiles into Assyria. Next, the Babylonians took control of the Middle East from the Assyrians, conquered the southern kingdom of Judah, and took most of its inhabitants as exiles into Babylonia. The Persians then took control from the Babylonians and let exiled peoples, including Jews, return to their native lands if they so wished. Some did. Others did not. Under the Persians there began the intertestamental period, sometimes called "the four hundred silent years" because of a gap in the biblical record (though nonbiblical records have survived). During this gap Alexander the Great came from Greece-Macedonia and conquered the Middle East by inflicting successive defeats on the Persians at the battles of Granicus (334 B.C.), Issus (333 B.C.), and Arbela (331 B.C.).

Hellenization

The Greek culture, called Hellenism, had been spreading for some time through Greek trade and colonization, but Alexander's conquests provided far greater impetus than before. The Greek language became the lingua franca, or common trade and diplomatic language. By New Testament times Greek had established itself as the street language even in Rome, where the indigenous proletariat spoke Latin but the great mass of slaves and freedmen spoke Greek (compare Paul's writing his Letter to the Romans in Greek). Alexander founded seventy cities and modeled them after the Greek style. He and his soldiers married oriental women. Thus the Greek and oriental cultures mixed.

Diadochi

When Alexander died in 323 B.C. at the age of thirty-three, his leading generals (called diadochi, Greek for "successors") divided the empire into four parts. Two of the parts are important for New Testament historical background, the Ptolemaic and the Seleucid. The Ptolemaic Empire centered in Egypt. Alexandria was its capital. The series of rulers who governed that empire are called the Ptolemies, after the name of the first ruler, Ptolemy. Cleopatra, who died in 30 B.C., was the last of the Ptolemaic dynasty. The Seleucid Empire centered in Syria. Antioch was its capital. A number of its rulers were named Seleucus, after the first ruler. Several others were named Antiochus, after the capital city. Together they are called the Seleucids. When the Roman general Pompey made Syria a Roman province in 64 B.C., the Seleucid Empire came to an end.

Because it was sandwiched between Egypt and Syria, Palestine became a victim of rivalry between the Ptolemies and the Seleucids, both of whom wanted to collect taxes from its inhabitants and make it a buffer zone against attack from the other. At first the Ptolemies dominated Palestine for 122 years (320-198 B.C.). Generally, the Jews fared well during this period. Early tradition says that under Ptolemy Philadelphus (285-246 B.C.) seventy-two Jewish scholars began to translate the Hebrew Old Testament into a Greek version called the Septuagint. Translation of the Pentateuch came first. Remaining sections of the Old Testament came later. The work was done in Egypt, apparently for Jews who understood Greek better than Hebrew and, contrary to the tradition, probably by Egyptian rather than Palestinian Jews. For parts of the translation betray a knowledge of Hebrew so poor as to indicate that the translators had less familiarity with Hebrew than with Greek, as would be probable if they lived, not in Palestine, but in Egypt. The Roman numeral LXX (seventy being the nearest round number to seventy-two) has become the common symbol for this version of the Old Testament.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from A Survey of the New Testament by Robert Horton Gundry Copyright © 2003 by Robert H. Gundry . Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Illustrations, Maps, and Charts.................................................................................................vi
Pronunciation Key...............................................................................................................xii
Acknowledgments.................................................................................................................xiii
Preface.........................................................................................................................xv
Introduction....................................................................................................................xvii
PART ONE: Political, Cultural, and Religious Antecedents
1. Intertestamental and New Testament Historical Background.....................................................................2
2. The Secular Settings of the New Testament....................................................................................24
3. The Religious and Philosophical Settings of the New Testament................................................................44
PART TWO: Literary and Historical Materials
4. The Canon and Text of the New Testament......................................................................................78
5. The Study of Jesus' Life.....................................................................................................90
6. An Introductory Overview of Jesus' Public Life and Ministry..................................................................110
PART THREE: The Four Canonical Gospels and Acts
7. Mark: An Apology for the Crucifixion of Jesus................................................................................124
8. Matthew: Handbook for a Mixed Church under Persecution.......................................................................158
9. Luke: A Promotion of Christianity in the Greco-Roman World at Large..........................................................206
10. John: Believing in Jesus for Eternal Life...................................................................................254
11. Acts: A Promotion of Christianity in the Greco-Roman World at Large (Continued from the Gospel of Luke).....................298
PART FOUR: The Letters
12. The Early Letters of Paul...................................................................................................346
13. The Major Letters of Paul...................................................................................................372
14. The Prison Letters of Paul..................................................................................................412
15. The Pastoral Letters of Paul................................................................................................438
16. Hebrews: Jesus as Priest....................................................................................................456
17. The Catholic, or General, Letters...........................................................................................472
PART FIVE: The Apocalypse
18. Revelation: Jesus Is Coming!................................................................................................504
In Retrospect...................................................................................................................529
Books in the New Testament: A Summary...........................................................................................530
Glossary of Pronunciations......................................................................................................532
Selective Index of Subjects.....................................................................................................537
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