Survival Guide for Medical Students

Survival Guide for Medical Students

by Saul Wischnitzer, Edith Wischnitzer
     
 

A practical guide for helping medical students understand the inner workings of medical school education and postgraduate training processes. The authors advise on "what to expect" and "how to respond" to a number of issues confronting students, including educational and psychological transition to medical school, attrition, traditional and nontraditional curricula

Overview

A practical guide for helping medical students understand the inner workings of medical school education and postgraduate training processes. The authors advise on "what to expect" and "how to respond" to a number of issues confronting students, including educational and psychological transition to medical school, attrition, traditional and nontraditional curricula, preparing for the USMLE, and choosing a residency. Also offered is a preview of what to expect in medical practice.

Editorial Reviews

Reviewer: Scott Andrew McDaniel, MD (University of Alabama at Birmingham)
Description: This is a preparation guide for medical training, including medical school and residency. It gives the reader an approach to surviving, both on a personal and professional level.
Purpose: The purpose is to give readers knowledge of what lies ahead in their medical training to alleviate some of the stress associated with the fear of the unknown. In many respects, this fear can generate a disproportionate amount of stress in the life of the medical trainee. The book also serves to provide the reader with a very basic "to do" list during each step in the training — steps that are crucial to surviving the ordeal. This book meets its objectives of explaining medical training in its simplest form and providing information about the expectations of the trainee at each new step.
Audience: This book is targeted toward both college students and medical students and is a topic broad enough to encompass all areas of medicine.
Features: All aspects of medical training are discussed, from undergraduate studies to medical school to residency. The main focus is providing readers with information about the demands involved in obtaining a medical degree, including how to make the transition from undergraduate to medical student. Then it provides useful guidelines for altering study habits and making necessary lifestyle changes. The book does an outstanding job of providing historical information about medical training and then comparing it to modern-day practices. It also does a good job of providing a step-by-step approach to the new tasks that readers will face; examples of these tasks include studying medical facts, participating in daily lectures, and taking medicine examinations. The book is also an excellent source for recommendations about the way to handle the changes that will inevitably occur in the personal life of medical trainees.
Assessment: This is a useful guide for undergraduates and medical students alike to prepare for the rigors of the medical curriculum. It takes readers from the earliest beginnings of medical training through current practices to explain the format of medical training. It also alleviates many of the fears of the unknown that are associated with beginning medical training. The book covers all aspects of medical training from undergraduate studies through residency with specific, timely suggestions pertinent to each step along the course of training.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Scott Andrew McDaniel, MD (University of Alabama at Birmingham)
Description: This is a preparation guide for medical training, including medical school and residency. It gives the reader an approach to surviving, both on a personal and professional level.
Purpose: The purpose is to give readers knowledge of what lies ahead in their medical training to alleviate some of the stress associated with the fear of the unknown. In many respects, this fear can generate a disproportionate amount of stress in the life of the medical trainee. The book also serves to provide the reader with a very basic "to do" list during each step in the training — steps that are crucial to surviving the ordeal. This book meets its objectives of explaining medical training in its simplest form and providing information about the expectations of the trainee at each new step.
Audience: This book is targeted toward both college students and medical students and is a topic broad enough to encompass all areas of medicine.
Features: All aspects of medical training are discussed, from undergraduate studies to medical school to residency. The main focus is providing readers with information about the demands involved in obtaining a medical degree, including how to make the transition from undergraduate to medical student. Then it provides useful guidelines for altering study habits and making necessary lifestyle changes. The book does an outstanding job of providing historical information about medical training and then comparing it to modern-day practices. It also does a good job of providing a step-by-step approach to the new tasks that readers will face; examples of these tasks include studying medical facts, participating in daily lectures, and taking medicine examinations. The book is also an excellent source for recommendations about the way to handle the changes that will inevitably occur in the personal life of medical trainees.
Assessment: This is a useful guide for undergraduates and medical students alike to prepare for the rigors of the medical curriculum. It takes readers from the earliest beginnings of medical training through current practices to explain the format of medical training. It also alleviates many of the fears of the unknown that are associated with beginning medical training. The book covers all aspects of medical training from undergraduate studies through residency with specific, timely suggestions pertinent to each step along the course of training.
Booknews
Discussion begins with several aspects of entrance into medical school, including the impact of the changing role of the physician on new medical students; favorable chances of completing medical school; and the transition from college to medical school. Coverage then continues with strategies for obtaining and retaining knowledge in medical school, details of the medical school curriculum, major specialties and subspecialties for residency, and strategies for securing and surviving a residency. The text concludes with a brief discussion of some important aspects of medical practice after medical schooling. Saul Wischnitzer is a former anatomy professor, Long Island U.; Edith Wischnitzer is a research associate. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781560534723
Publisher:
Elsevier Health Sciences
Publication date:
05/14/2001
Pages:
266
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.52(d)

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