Surviving the Angel of Death: The True Story of a Mengele Twin in Auschwitz

Surviving the Angel of Death: The True Story of a Mengele Twin in Auschwitz

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by Eva Mozes Kor, Lisa Rojany Buccieri
     
 

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Eva Mozes Kor was just ten years old when she arrived in Auschwitz. While her parents and two older sisters were taken to the gas chambers, she and her twin, Miriam, were herded into the care of the man known as the Angel of Death, Dr. Josef Mengele. Subjected to sadistic medical experiments, she was forced to fight daily for her and her twin's survival. In this…  See more details below

Overview

Eva Mozes Kor was just ten years old when she arrived in Auschwitz. While her parents and two older sisters were taken to the gas chambers, she and her twin, Miriam, were herded into the care of the man known as the Angel of Death, Dr. Josef Mengele. Subjected to sadistic medical experiments, she was forced to fight daily for her and her twin's survival. In this incredible true story written for young adults, readers learn of a child's endurance and survival in the face of truly extraordinary evil.

The book also includes an epilogue on Eva's recovery from this experience and her remarkable decision to publicly forgive the Nazis. Through her museum and her lectures, she has dedicated her life to giving testimony on the Holocaust, providing a message of hope for people who have suffered, and working for causes of human rights and peace.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Victoria Vogel
Kor's story is one of survival and hope. Born in 1934, Eva and her identical twin, Miriam, were loved and doted over. They lived a comfortable and happy life on their family's farm in Transylvania until the summer of 1940, when their family was herded onto a train with the other Jews in their town and transported to Auschwitz supposedly for their "protection." They were soon separated from their family, and never saw them again. Being identical twins afforded Eva and Miriam special "privileges." They soon joined a large group of other twins who were under the care of Dr. Josef Mengele, otherwise known as the Angel of Death. These children were allowed to keep their own clothes and hair, but they were the subject of countless gruesome and tortuous medical experiments that many did not survive. Eva and Miriam did carry on and were able to make it until the Russian army invaded the camp and liberated them, but their lives were never the same. They had lost their family and suffered a physical ordeal that did irreversible damage. Eva's story will have the reader hooked until the very end. Although the narrative is somewhat unpolished, it does not detract from the impact of this harrowing and moving story. Readers of all ages will remember her narrative and will be inspired by it. This book is an essential purchase for libraries with a Holocaust collection, but it would also be a valuable addition to any library with young impressionable readers. Reviewer: Victoria Vogel
From the Publisher

"This book is an essential purchase for libraries with a Holocaust collection, but it would also be a valuable addition to any library with young impressionable readers." — VOYA
Children's Literature - Myrna Dee Marler
Eva and her twin sister Miriam were taken at the age of ten to Auschwitz. Instead of going to the gas chamber with their mother and other siblings, they were placed in Dr. Mengele's hands as part of his notorious twin experiments during the Holocaust. Up until that moment, the trajectory of their story follows the path set down by so many previous survivors: the escalation of persecution, the forming of ghettoes, the starvation, and finally the forced transportation to the gates of the death camps. Although their lives were temporarily spared, they were expected to die as a result of Mengele's insane practices. For example, Miriam and Eva were injected with deadly bacteria and observed as they became sicker and sicker. Yet somehow they survived until the Russians liberated the camp. They lived under Communist rule for several years, then in Israel before ultimately coming to the United States. This short memoir would be a good introduction to the Holocaust for younger teens. It is highly readable and tells an important story. The authors add another voice to the continually growing narrative of Holocaust survivors. Reviewer: Myrna Dee Marler
VOYA - Eileen Kuhl
In this straightforward first-person narrative, Kor , with the help of coauthor Buccieri, recounts her harrowing experiences during the Holocaust. Kor and her twin Miriam were born in 1934 in Transylvania, Romania. Their parents owned a profitable farm and were able to survive in the Nazi anti-Semitic atmosphere until 1944 when the family was arrested and sent to Auschwitz. The twins were separated from their parents and sisters as soon as they arrived and sent to a special section of the concentration camp for twins. Josef Mengele, a renowned Nazi doctor, was conducting experiments using identical twins and other genetic irregularities to enhance medical breakthroughs and create the perfect German race. The narrative is painfully detailed as Kor recounts being tattooed for identification; the agonizing, sadistic medical experiments performed on her; and her constant battle to survive and keep her twin with her. The memoir, written from a child's perspective, also describes Kor's life after World War II, first in Europe, then in Israel, and finally in Indiana. Extensive use of historical photographs and visual documentation brings a greater depth to readers' understanding of the daily life endured by the Auschwitz children. They will be astonished at Kor's triumph and stubborn determination to overcome her horrific experience. Although events are explicit, the narrator's voice is young, making Kor's story seem more appropriate for middle school. This important book brings to light a relatively unfamiliar part of the Holocaust, but it lacks a bibliography or suggested further reading. Readers of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (David Fickling Books/Random House, 2006/VOYA December 2006). will discover a true account of children during this time period. Reviewer: Eileen Kuhl
Judith A. Hayn
Eva Mozes Kor wanted her self-published memoir of her experiences as a survivor of Dr. Josef Mengele's twin experiments in Auschwitz to be adapted for young adult readers. Rojany Buccieri wrote a masterful, searing, and mind-numbing account of two sisters who, at age 10, entered the Nazi camp of horror and evil and emerged as survivors. Eva's only goal was to keep herself and her sister alive, but it is her firstperson narrative voice that lends powerful credence to the power of the human spirit and the strength of the will to live despite incredible odds. Eva provides details of Mengele's experiments and camp conditions, while family pictures before and after the camp provide additional documentation. The text not only honors Eva and her courage, but also offers a compelling argument about forgiveness and tolerance. The reader will not want to stop reading until the last page. Reviewer: Judith A. Hayn
Children's Literature - Sara Rofofsky Marcus
Eva Mozes, the younger identical twin to Miriam, tells the story of a happy childhood in Romania as the only Jewish family in the town that changes quickly as their family is suddenly captured by the Nazis, ending in Auschwitz. Eva and Miriam, who always dressed alike, are selected for Mengele's experiments, never again to see their mother, father, or four older sisters. Eva, the stronger of the two, becomes the leader, at age ten, in their quest for survival at the hands of the Nazis in the camps and later as the two try to return home and to a normal life, seeking family and stability. The true value of this autobiographical tale of survival and triumph is twofold. It demonstrates the power of love and shows the insights of one of Mengele's chosen twins. Whether a child learning about the Holocaust or an adult desiring more knowledge of what really happened under Mengele's medical direction, this biography tells all. Written so a young reader can understand, the content is sufficiently detailed so as to appeal to the older reader. This is a book worthy of being added to any child, young adult, or adult collection due to its first-person narrative of a child in one of the special camps, a story of survival and remembrance against odds that differed from those in the traditional camps. Reviewer: Sara Rofofsky Marcus
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up—Kor relates memories of life in the village of Portz, Transylvania (Romania), where she was raised on a large farm, "never aware of the anti-Semitism [that pervaded the country] until 1940, when the Hungarian army came." Six-year-old Eva and her identical twin, Miriam, the only Jewish children in their small mixed-grade classroom, suddenly found themselves taunted and beaten by once-friendly classmates. At 10 years of age, the twins and their family were forced to live among seven thousand other Jews in a fenced-in field, protected from the elements only by tents made of their own blankets and sheets and by the clothes on their backs. They were soon taken on a four-day train ride to Auschwitz, standing all the way, with no food or drink. There the sisters were "selected" to be victims of Dr. Josef Mengele's medical "research." Eva's amazing fortitude and her desire to protect her sister helped her to survive a horrible disease brought on by an injection. Both twins endured a terrifying daylong separation during a forced march between camps; the remaining Auschwitz prisoners were liberated by Soviet soldiers, and the girls found a way to go home in search of family survivors. Kor's straightforward first-person narrative is unusual because it details life in the concentration camp through the eyes of a child who lived among children. In an eight-page epilogue, the author talks about her discovery, 50 years after liberation, of the importance of forgiveness ("a seed for peace"), and of what she has done to teach young people the positive lessons of life garnered from her horrific experiences.—Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933718682
Publisher:
Tanglewood Press IN
Publication date:
10/07/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
175
Sales rank:
97,043
File size:
5 MB
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

What People are saying about this

Tutu Archbishop Desmond
"Eva Mozes Kor has written a very moving and vivid account of an extraordinary and horrific experience. It is an important document showing the strength of the human spirit and the capacity to forgive.
She should be commended for having the courage to write about her traumatic childhood, leading to the forgiveness that freed her from hatred and brought her peace. May it inspire others to emulate her."

Meet the Author

Eva Mozes Kor is a resident of Terre Haute, IN. She is a recognized speaker, both nationally and internationally, on topics related to the Holocaust, human rights, and medical ethics. She has been covered in numerous media outlets and is the subject of a documentary, Forgiving Dr. Mengele.
Lisa Rojany Buccieri has written over 100 children's books, including several award-winning and bestselling titles. She is also a publisher executive and editor with over 20 years of experience in the industry. Lisa lives with her family in Los Angeles.

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