Surviving the Bosnian Genocide: The Women of Srebrenica Speak

Overview

In July 1995, the Army of the Serbian Republic killed some 8,000 Bosnian men and boys in and around the town of Srebrenica?the largest mass murder in Europe since World War II.
Surviving the Bosnian Genocide is based on the testimonies of 60 female survivors of the massacre who were interviewed by Dutch historian Selma Leydesdorff. The women, many of whom still live in refugee camps, talk about their lives before the Bosnian war, the events of the massacre, and the ways they ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $16.93   
  • New (12) from $17.99   
  • Used (8) from $16.93   
Surviving the Bosnian Genocide: The Women of Srebrenica Speak

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$24.95
BN.com price

Overview

In July 1995, the Army of the Serbian Republic killed some 8,000 Bosnian men and boys in and around the town of Srebrenica—the largest mass murder in Europe since World War II.
Surviving the Bosnian Genocide is based on the testimonies of 60 female survivors of the massacre who were interviewed by Dutch historian Selma Leydesdorff. The women, many of whom still live in refugee camps, talk about their lives before the Bosnian war, the events of the massacre, and the ways they have tried to cope with their fate. Drawing on their memories, though fragmented by trauma, the women tell of life and survival under extreme conditions, while recalling a time before the war when Muslims, Croats, and Serbs lived together peaceably. By giving them a voice, this book looks beyond the rapes, murders, and atrocities of that dark time to show the agency of these women during and after the war and their fight to uncover the truth of what happened at Srebrenica and why.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In July 1995, the Serbian army murdered about 8,100 Bosnian men and boys in Srebrenica—a town that had been designated a "safe area" by the U.N. and was ostensibly under the protection of Dutch soldiers. That the Dutch—outnumbered and unprepared—did nothing to stop the killings only added to the survivors' trauma and feelings of abandonment. With sensitivity and compassion, Leydesdorff (We Lived with Dignity) interviews about 50 female survivors of the Srebrenica massacre, many of whom still live in refugee camps, in this valuable oral history. Many of the women still exhibit signs of severe trauma, and though they survived, most have not found a new reason to live; others feel relentless guilt they could not do more to save their families. Exploring the war-torn years from 1992 to 1995 that led to the genocide, Leydesdorff puts her interviews in a broader, scholarly context by relating the women's experiences to survival stories of WWII and to prior research on trauma and rape victims. One of her main conclusions is that too little effort has been made to listen to these women's concerns, which she addresses by giving readers a valuable perspective on these survivors, encouraging them to tell their own stories. (Oct.)
Internationale Spectator

"A book of remarkable integrity that gives the victims voices, faces, families, and lives.... The author succeeds in creating an honest and sensitive picture from the jumble of stories, emotions, and reminiscences.... A work of great social relevance." —Internationale Spectator

Oral History Review

"Surviving the Bosnian Genocide provdes a clear, concise analysis of conditions in Srebrenica and the genocidal massacre in Potocari. As an author, Leydesdorff manages to organize excerpts from dozens of interviewees in a manner that allows their words to carry the weight of the experience, while interjecting herself only to provide the necessary historical perspective to maintain its readability. Ultimately, this collection of experiences succeeds at placing the human toll of mass atrocities in the forefront of the historical discussion in a way that preserves the emotional scars such events leave in their wake." —Oral History Review

From the Publisher
"Surviving the Bosnian Genocide provdes a clear, concise analysis of conditions in
Srebrenica and the genocidal massacre in Potocari. As an author, Leydesdorff manages to organize excerpts from dozens of interviewees in a manner that allows their words to carry the weight of the experience, while interjecting herself only to provide the necessary historical perspective to maintain its readability. Ultimately, this collection of experiences succeeds at placing the human toll of mass atrocities in the forefront of the historical discussion in a way that preserves the emotional scars such events leave in their wake." —Oral History Review

"With sensitivity and compassion, Leydesdorff... interviews about 50 female survivors of the Srebrenica massacre... in this valuable oral history." —Publishers Weekly

"A book of remarkable integrity that gives the victims voices, faces, families, and lives.... The author succeeds in creating an honest and sensitive picture from the jumble of stories, emotions, and reminiscences.... A work of great social relevance." —Internationale
Spectator

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253356697
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 10/11/2011
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 1,339,369
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Selma Leydesdorff is Professor of Oral History and Culture at the University of
Amsterdam. She is author of We Lived with Dignity: The Jewish Proletariat of Amsterdam,
1900–1940 and editor (with Nanci Adler, Mary Chamberlain, and Leyla Neyzi) of Memories of Mass
Repression: Narrating Life Stories in the Aftermath of Atrocity.

Kay Richardson is a retired editor with 30 years of experience in international scholarly publishing. During her 13
years of residence in the Netherlands, she gained fluency in Dutch and developed an abiding interest in Dutch history and culture.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
On the Publication of the English Edition
List of abbreviations
Preface: What Happened Before

Sabaheta’s
Story
1. Farewell: The Desolation, the Women
2. An Orphaned World: Life before the
War
3. War is Coming
4. Living on the Run, Living in Danger
5. A Human
Shooting Gallery—Srebrenica 1992-1995
6. Violence
7. Departure without
Arrival

Notes
Index

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 14, 2012

    I became interested in learning more about the Bosnian ethnic cl

    I became interested in learning more about the Bosnian ethnic cleansing in the 1990s after watching PBS's 'I Came to Testify'. This was the first book I picked up after watching an interview with the author. The tone is rather dry, possibly due to being a translation, but one can still feel the daily horrors suffered by all these women. What makes the atrocities all the more horrific is that they were often perpetrated by people they trusted (e.g. former neighbors, childhood friends), creating lasting physical and psychological wounds. I don't know how they - Serbs and Bosnians - can recover after inflicting and/or suffering the worst that the humanity can offer. It may take generations before the wounds can heal. The book made me think a lot about what it means to be human.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)