Surviving Tornadoes

Surviving Tornadoes

by Elizabeth Raum
     
 

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What is a twister?

Can tornadoes be predicted?

Where is "tornado alley"?

Discover the astonishing true stories of real children in extraordinary situations around the world. Children's True Stories: Natural Disasters tells the fascinating stories of young people caught up in dangerous natural hazards.

Each title in the Children's True Stories:

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Overview

What is a twister?

Can tornadoes be predicted?

Where is "tornado alley"?

Discover the astonishing true stories of real children in extraordinary situations around the world. Children's True Stories: Natural Disasters tells the fascinating stories of young people caught up in dangerous natural hazards.

Each title in the Children's True Stories: Natural Disasters series contains:

Insight into daily life for children coping with natural disasters

Biographies of real survivor children and their later successes

Groups and organizations that have helped victims of natural disasters

Regional and world maps highlighting areas of devastation.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristi Bernard
As a resident of the Midwest I am very familiar with tornadoes. I have survived some very scary moments and have witnessed firsthand the devastation a tornado can cause. I have seen whole communities left with barely anything standing. When tornadoes land you can hear a rumbling and roaring sound which is reminiscent of a train. It is not a sound you want to hear. A tornado is a column of air that rotates at a very high speed. Generally they begin when severe weather is present. Warm air mixes with cooler air and that is when a tornado is born. About 1,300 tornadoes strike the United States each year. That is about three-fourths of all the tornadoes worldwide. Only about 1 in 100 Americans will ever see a tornado in person. Fargo, North Dakota in 1957, seven-year-old Doug Dokken was playing in his backyard with his brother. Doug described the tornado as being a giant upside down birthday cake with greenish black frosting. Doug's family was lucky. The tornado missed their house. United Kingdom, 2005, fourteen-year-old Natasha West and her family survived a tornado that ripped apart their home. Broken glass and pieces of the floor flew around them. Raum has done an excellent job of teaching young readers what happens before, during and after a devastating tornado. Actual photos show homes ripped to pieces, cars piled up and tornadoes in action. Entire communities pull together to start the cleanup. The back of the book has maps, a glossary and many resources to help young readers, teachers and parents learn more about tornadoes and how to keep safe. Part of the "Children's True Stories: Natural Disasters" series. Reviewer: Kristi Bernard
School Library Journal
Gr 3–4—Each book highlights four historically significant disasters in chronological order. Earthquakes focuses on the 1906 San Francisco quake and ends with the one that devastated Haiti in 2010. Cunningham mentions tsunamis in Newfoundland in 1929 and Thailand in 2004. Tornadoes covers areas hit in Fargo, ND, in 1957 that led to the development of the Fujita scale. It mentions the Super Outbreak in the United States in 1974, when 148 tornadoes touched down in 13 states and shows that these forces can strike anywhere. Hurricanes spotlights Galveston, TX, in 1900; Darwin, Australia, in 1974; New Orleans in 2005; and Bangladesh in 2007. Quotes from child survivors are taken from books, newspaper articles, and interviews to create a story of the events leading up to, during, and after the disaster. Survival suggestions are limited: constructing stronger buildings in earthquake-prone areas; implementing better early warning systems for tsunamis; going into a basement or small room when a tornado warning is issued; and building seawalls, raising the level of the land, and protecting wetlands to help reduce hurricane damage. Number-crunching data shows statistics and mathematical information regarding the disasters. Photographs depict the destruction and rebuilding that occurs. Maps indicate areas where these natural disasters struck or those most commonly hit. A variety of fact blocks contains information about the survivors as adults, people and organizations that helped during the recovery, eyewitness accounts, and how the lives of people were impacted. There isn't much of a niche for these volumes; they don't have enough information for reports and they're definitely not for those searching for books on how to survive a disaster.—Sandra Welzenbach, Villarreal Elementary School, San Antonio, TX

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781410940926
Publisher:
Raintree Publishers
Publication date:
07/01/2011
Series:
Children's True Stories: Natural Disasters Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
NC840L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

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