Sushi

Overview

How to make great sushi at home.

This is a superb collection of traditional and contemporary recipes for sushi, suitable for cooks of all abilities. Sushi dishes are tempting and the recipes in this guide are easy to follow -- and all captured beautifully in stunning photographs.

The innovative presentations of sushi make it as much a feast for the eyes as for the palate. Internationally, sushi is now prepared for snacks, for starters, and for ...

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Overview

How to make great sushi at home.

This is a superb collection of traditional and contemporary recipes for sushi, suitable for cooks of all abilities. Sushi dishes are tempting and the recipes in this guide are easy to follow -- and all captured beautifully in stunning photographs.

The innovative presentations of sushi make it as much a feast for the eyes as for the palate. Internationally, sushi is now prepared for snacks, for starters, and for party food. With the emphasis always on the freshest produce and fish, Vicki Liley shows how to select the ingredients, prepare them successfully, and then present the sushi beautifully in such elegant dishes as:

  • California Hand Rolls
  • Tuna Hand-Formed Sushi
  • Vegetarian Scattered Sushi
  • Salmon Pressed Sushi
  • Omelet Parcel Sushi
  • Miso Soup with Tofu

For experienced home sushi makers or for beginners, Sushi's comprehensive equipment and ingredients guide, step-bystep instructions, beverage suggestions, and troubleshooting tips inspire the art of preparing and presenting this unique culinary experience.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552857410
  • Publisher: Whitecap Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 1/1/2010
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 1,081,278
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Vicki Liley is an innovative and versatile food writer, food stylist, and food photographer. Well known for making Asian-inspired recipes easy to prepare, Liley has written for leading food magazines and is the author of several cookbooks.

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Preface


Introduction


Sushi, though it may seem humble, is always prepared with great care and is beautifully presented at the table. Given these qualities, it is easy to appreciate the Japanese tradition that food should satisfy all the senses. In Japan, sushi is considered an everyday food. It has enormous variety in both the ingredients used and the different ways it is assembled.

Traditional sushi chefs train long and hard to master the skills necessary for their profession. They learn how to select, handle, preserve and prepare ingredients, and they practice an array of time-honored techniques for making sushi. The idea of preparing sushi might seem intimidating, but once you learn about the basic ingredients and how they are combined, you will find that sushi is easy to assemble at home and that it makes an impressive and delicious meal to serve your family and friends.

Sushi has nutritional advantages as well. Oily fish such as tuna and salmon are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are highly beneficial in the prevention of heart disease. Most varieties of fresh fish are excellent sources of vitamin B12, essential for building and maintaining healthy cells. Fresh ginger aids in digestion, as does vinegar. which also has antibacterial qualities. Nori, made of seaweed, contains protein, minerals (especially iodine) and vitamins A, B1, B2, B6 and C. The average life expectancy in Japan is among the highest in the world.

The term sushi refers to dishes based on sumeshi, or cooled vinegared rice. The main ingredient is fresh, seasonal fish. In fact, sushi originated as a way of preserving fish. No one knows exactly when sushi was invented, but fishwas being pickled with rice in Southeast Asia as early as the fifth century BCE. According to some historians, sushi came to Japan with the introduction of rice cultivation in the fourth century BCE. Others believe that Buddhist priests training in China in the seventh century CE brought sushi with them on their return to Japan.

Later, layers of carp and rice, called nare-zushi, placed in a jar were used as a form of tax payment. The jar was sealed and the contents left to ferment for up to a year. When the time came to open the jar, the fish was removed and eaten, and the rice discarded. This form of sushi can still be found in Japan. Methods of fermentation have developed considerably since then, but the layering of ingredients -- rice, fish and vegetables -- eventually evolved into the form of sushi we know today.

Sushi is now eaten worldwide as a snack, starter, main course or party food. It is made in many different forms, from rolled, pressed and hand-formed sushi to bowls of vinegared rice scattered with fish and vegetables, known as chirashi-zushi. The rice is usually prepared first, then shaped or molded before the other ingredients are added. When served, sushi is presented in artful arrangements on a platter or on individual dishes. Thin slices of pickled ginger, a small mound of Japanese horseradish called wasabi and soy sauce are offered as accompaniments.

When eating sushi, you can use either your fingers or chopsticks. Contrary to popular belief, the wasabi should not be mixed with the soy sauce. Doing so dilutes the flavors of the two condiments. Instead, a small amount of wasabi is dabbed onto the sushi, which is then dipped into soy sauce. Using too much of either will overwhelm the fresh ingredients that give sushi its delicate tastes. The pickled ginger is consumed between types of sushi to cleanse the palate.

The growing number of sushi restaurants outside Japan attest to the worldwide popularity of this appetizing food. Whether you already make sushi at home or are attempting it for the first time, you will find many enticing recipes in this book. Some might take a bit of practice to master, but most are easy to prepare on the first try.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

Sushi, though it may seem humble, is always prepared with great care and is beautifully presented at the table. Given these qualities, it is easy to appreciate the Japanese tradition that food should satisfy all the senses. In Japan, sushi is considered an everyday food. It has enormous variety in both the ingredients used and the different ways it is assembled.

Traditional sushi chefs train long and hard to master the skills necessary for their profession. They learn how to select, handle, preserve and prepare ingredients, and they practice an array of time-honored techniques for making sushi. The idea of preparing sushi might seem intimidating, but once you learn about the basic ingredients and how they are combined, you will find that sushi is easy to assemble at home and that it makes an impressive and delicious meal to serve your family and friends.

Sushi has nutritional advantages as well. Oily fish such as tuna and salmon are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are highly beneficial in the prevention of heart disease. Most varieties of fresh fish are excellent sources of vitamin B12, essential for building and maintaining healthy cells. Fresh ginger aids in digestion, as does vinegar. which also has antibacterial qualities. Nori, made of seaweed, contains protein, minerals (especially iodine) and vitamins A, B1, B2, B6 and C. The average life expectancy in Japan is among the highest in the world.

The term sushi refers to dishes based on sumeshi, or cooled vinegared rice. The main ingredient is fresh, seasonal fish. In fact, sushi originated as a way of preserving fish. No one knows exactly when sushi was invented, but fish wasbeing pickled with rice in Southeast Asia as early as the fifth century BCE. According to some historians, sushi came to Japan with the introduction of rice cultivation in the fourth century BCE. Others believe that Buddhist priests training in China in the seventh century CE brought sushi with them on their return to Japan.

Later, layers of carp and rice, called nare-zushi, placed in a jar were used as a form of tax payment. The jar was sealed and the contents left to ferment for up to a year. When the time came to open the jar, the fish was removed and eaten, and the rice discarded. This form of sushi can still be found in Japan. Methods of fermentation have developed considerably since then, but the layering of ingredients -- rice, fish and vegetables -- eventually evolved into the form of sushi we know today.

Sushi is now eaten worldwide as a snack, starter, main course or party food. It is made in many different forms, from rolled, pressed and hand-formed sushi to bowls of vinegared rice scattered with fish and vegetables, known as chirashi-zushi. The rice is usually prepared first, then shaped or molded before the other ingredients are added. When served, sushi is presented in artful arrangements on a platter or on individual dishes. Thin slices of pickled ginger, a small mound of Japanese horseradish called wasabi and soy sauce are offered as accompaniments.

When eating sushi, you can use either your fingers or chopsticks. Contrary to popular belief, the wasabi should not be mixed with the soy sauce. Doing so dilutes the flavors of the two condiments. Instead, a small amount of wasabi is dabbed onto the sushi, which is then dipped into soy sauce. Using too much of either will overwhelm the fresh ingredients that give sushi its delicate tastes. The pickled ginger is consumed between types of sushi to cleanse the palate.

The growing number of sushi restaurants outside Japan attest to the worldwide popularity of this appetizing food. Whether you already make sushi at home or are attempting it for the first time, you will find many enticing recipes in this book. Some might take a bit of practice to master, but most are easy to prepare on the first try.

Read More Show Less

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