Swagger [NOOK Book]

Overview

Levi was simple, like a child. It was the best thing about him, and it was the worst, too. 

When high school senior Jonas moves to Seattle, he is glad to meet Levi, a nice, soft-spoken guy and fellow basketball player. Suspense builds like a slow drumbeat as readers start to smell a rat in Ryan Hartwell, a charismatic basketball coach and sexual predator. When Levi reluctantly tells Jonas that Hartwell abused him, Jonas has to decide whether he should risk his future career...

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Swagger

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Overview

Levi was simple, like a child. It was the best thing about him, and it was the worst, too. 

When high school senior Jonas moves to Seattle, he is glad to meet Levi, a nice, soft-spoken guy and fellow basketball player. Suspense builds like a slow drumbeat as readers start to smell a rat in Ryan Hartwell, a charismatic basketball coach and sexual predator. When Levi reluctantly tells Jonas that Hartwell abused him, Jonas has to decide whether he should risk his future career to report the coach. Pitch-perfect basketball plays, well-developed characters, and fine storytelling make this psychological sports novel a slam dunk.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/14/2013
When 17-year-old basketball player Jonas Dolan moves to Seattle, he not only has to earn a spot on a new team, he also needs to spend enough time on the court to impress a college coach interested in giving him a scholarship. When the team’s coach is injured, and young Coach Hartwell takes over with a fast-break style that’s in line with Jonas’s own, the team starts winning—and Jonas finally has a starring role as point guard. But Deuker (Payback Time) provides enough foreshadowing for readers to understand that something is wrong with the new coach, who served beer to players at a party at his apartment and was involved in the accident that landed Coach Knecht in the hospital. The novel includes descriptions of many basketball plays and strategies, which should make this book particularly appealing to fans of the game. The plotting is otherwise somewhat slow—despite short, rapid-fire chapters—but once Jonas (and readers) figure out what’s going on with Coach Hartwell, the pace quickens, and Jonas’s struggle to do the right thing intensifies. Ages 12–up. (Nov.)
From the Publisher
A Junior Library Guild Selection

"Deuker creates a textured cast of parents, coaches, and teens and deftly handles themes of personal ethics, teamwork, burgeoning friendships, and coping with an abusive adult."
Booklist

"A largely well-executed exploration of team spirit, friendship and the devastating impact of untrustworthy adults."
Kirkus

"Basketball fans will love the realistic hardwood action."
The Horn Book Magazine

"The novel includes descriptions of many basketball plays and strategies, which should make this book particularly appealing to fans of the game."
Publishers Weekly

"This is solid Deuker turf, populated by good kids trapped between conscience and goals. Expect fans to grab this title as soon as it hits the shelf."
Bulletin

"Short, action-packed chapters make for a quick read, but the story's underlying messages will linger. . . . What makes this story special is the careful handling of an incredibly difficult topic."
VOYA, 5Q 4P J S

"Deuker's ability to create fully realized characters who wrestle with moral dilemmas while incorporating plenty of game action raises his novel above typical sports fiction by several notches. This one will satisfy the author's longtime fans and win him many new ones."
School Library Journal

VOYA - Stacey Hayman
Jonas gets a wake-up call when his father's blue-collar job is eliminated through automation. Encouraged by his high school coach to consider playing college basketball for a Division II school, Jordan begins to see he has options for his future. Moving as a senior from Redwood City, California, to Seattle, Washington, for his dad's new job is challenging enough, but Jonas has to make the varsity team with kids and a coach he does not know while improving his academic standing to qualify for college admission and scholarships. Is it too much to ask, or will Jonas show he is a team player with leadership abilities? Short, action-packed chapters make for a quick read, but the story's underlying messages will linger. The basketball component might be of greater interest to boys, but both genders will appreciate the sincere friendship between the two main characters, as well as the secondary characters' realistic responses in various social situations. Without sounding preachy, the author is able to show Jonas finding the courage to stand up for what is right, acknowledging his own mistakes, and dealing with the consequences of his choices; but what makes this story special is the careful handling of an incredibly difficult topic: sexual abuse. Watching the slow process of a charismatic teacher taking advantage of his position to groom a vulnerable teen and the unglorified resolution will strike an honest, emotional note teens should find satisfying. This is a strong selection for reluctant and voracious readers alike. Reviewer: Stacey Hayman
School Library Journal
12/01/2013
Gr 7 Up—Jonas Dolan never thought he'd go to college—his parents can't afford it. But Coach thinks he has a real shot at a scholarship with a Division Two school. Sure enough, Monitor College wants his point guard skills if he can improve his academics. When his dad gets laid off, the family relocates to the Seattle area. Jonas keeps his basketball skills sharp through the summer, when he befriends Levi, and they are joined by 20-something Hartwell. As Jonas starts his senior year, it's evident that his new coach sees things differently from Coach Russell. Jonas is relegated to second string by Coach Knecht, who favors old-school basketball with no fancy handiwork. The guys are thrilled when Hartwell is hired on as the assistant coach, but even he cannot convince the elderly head coach to change his philosophy. Jonas sees his chances at a scholarship slipping away. When Knecht collapses at a game and Hartwell steps up to head the team, he allows them to play more assertively, leading to several victories. As Harding High's fortunes improve, Jonas notices that Levi is increasingly sullen and withdrawn. Eventually, Levi admits that Coach Hartwell has been sexually molesting him, but refuses to let Jonas tell anyone. Jonas confronts the assistant coach, but Hartwell threatens blackmail. Jonas must decide if he will protect himself and keep his scholarship secure, or protect potential victims. Deuker's ability to create fully realized characters who wrestle with moral dilemmas while incorporating plenty of game action raises his novel above typical sports fiction by several notches. This one will satisfy the author's longtime fans and win him many new ones.—Kim Dare, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-25
After his dad loses his job, basketball point guard Jonas Dolan starts over with a new team. To earn a college basketball scholarship, Jonas needs to play well and improve his grades. Both tasks become trickier, however, when the family moves to Seattle from Redwood City, Calif. His new coach, Knecht, plays old-school, by-the-book basketball and barely lets Jonas on the court. Jonas thinks he has a better shot when the charismatic new assistant coach, Hartwell, takes over the team. Despite his charm, Hartwell's judgment starts to seem questionable when he invites the team to a party at his apartment where he serves alcohol and when he helps Jonas cheat on a chemistry test. His sinister side isn't revealed in full, however, until Jonas' friend Levi discloses that Hartwell has repeatedly sexually assaulted him. Jonas' friendship with Levi, a sensitive, generous, loyal, devout Christian from Arkansas, gives the novel a strong, emotional center. The basketball action is well-drawn, and Jonas' frustration at Knecht's style of play is palpable. More attention could have been given, however, to the complexities of deciding how to respond to a friend who has been sexually assaulted and doesn't want to tell anyone. A largely well-executed exploration of team spirit, friendship and the devastating impact of untrustworthy adults. (Fiction. 12-18)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780544151543
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 11/5/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 83,455
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 543 KB

Meet the Author

Carl Deuker participated in several sports as a boy. He was good enough to make most teams, but not quite good enough to play much. He describes himself as a classic second-stringer. "I was too slow and too short for basketball; I was too small for football, a little too chicken to hang in there against the best fastballs. So, by my senior year the only sport I was still playing was golf." Carl still loves playing golf early on Sunday mornings at Jefferson Park in Seattle, the course on which Fred Couples learned to play. His handicap at present is 13. Combining his enthusiasm for both writing and athletics, Carl has created many exciting, award-winning novels for young adults. He currently lives in Seattle, Washington, with his wife and daughter.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

All this started about a year and a half ago. Back then I was a junior at Redwood High in Redwood City, a suburb twenty-five miles south of San Francisco. In those days, before Hartwell, before Levi, I took things as they came, without thinking a whole lot about them. Maybe that’s because most of the things that came my way were good.
   Take school. I didn’t much like my classes at Redwood High, but I did like being the starting point guard on the varsity basketball team. And I loved seeing my name, Jonas Dolan, in print in the sports section of the Redwood City Tribune.
   The main reason school never seemed to matter too much had to do with my father’s job. He made good money working for a sand and gravel company down at the Redwood City harbor. I liked visiting him at work—liked the noise of the cement mixers, the shouts of the men, the nonstop activity of the plant. I figured that once I graduated from high school, my dad would get me a job there. He thought so too; lots of times we talked about working together.
   Not that I was a total slacker in the classroom. You can’t play if you don’t earn your credits, so I studied enough to stay eligible. 
   Halfway into my sophomore season, I’d cracked the starting lineup on the varsity basketball team. For the rest of that season, I averaged eight points and three assists per game. During the first half of my junior year, I’d pushed those numbers up to eleven and six, making me one of the top four point guards in a decent league.
   Then I had my breakout game.
   It came in mid-January against Carlmont, a middle-of-the-pack team like us. Everyone expected the game to be a nail-biter, with one team winning by a few points. Instead, we trounced them. I scored fourteen points, pulled down five rebounds, and had nine assists, while turning the ball over only once. It was the best game of my life, but I didn’t feel as if I was playing out of my mind. Instead, it was like everybody else on the court was wearing lead shoes, while I was lighter than air.
 
Chapter 2

That Carlmont game  had been on a Wednesday night. I floated through school the next day and through practice after school. As I was leaving the gym, I heard Coach Russell’s voice. “Jonas Dolan, come to my office.”
   He sat me down across from him, pulled on his big ears a couple of times, scratched his gray hair, and finally asked me what I planned to do when I finished high school.
   “My dad works at the sand and gravel. He can get me a job there.”
   “No plans for college?”
   I didn’t like the way Coach Russell said that, as if there was something wrong with people who didn’t go to college. “Neither of my parents went to college, and they’ve done okay.”
   Coach Russell started waving his hands around, his face reddening. “Completely true, Jonas. I know your dad; I know Robert. He’s a hard-working man. And I’ve met your mom, though I can’t say I know her. There’s nothing wrong with working with your hands. But you’ve got your whole life to work. If you go to college, you can be a kid for a while longer. That sand and gravel plant isn’t going anywhere.”
   As he spoke, I thought about what it would be like to work eight hours every single day. Was I ready to do that? Still, I shook my head when he finished. “I’m lucky to get Cs, Coach. I’m no student.”
   “But you could be a good student, Jonas. I talked to your teachers; they all say that.”
   After he said this we both sat, the seconds ticking away. Then he leaned forward, a glint in his eyes. “If you could play basketball in college, would that make a difference?”
   I was so startled by the thought that I laughed. “Sure it would, but there’s no college that wants a six-foot white guy who can’t dunk. The worst player on a crappy team like Oregon State is way better than I am.”
   Coach Russell put his big hands flat on his desk and leaned back. “Jonas, Oregon State is a Division One school. I’m not saying you’re D-One material. However, there are three hundred Division Two schools that have basketball teams. Many are top-notch private colleges—great places to get an education. You’re a hard-nosed ballplayer; you’re the most coachable kid I’ve had in years; your game is coming on like gangbusters. Those are all qualities that D-Two coaches look for.”
   As he spoke, a strange thrill raced through me. I was a step slower than the black guys from Oakland and San Francisco I’d played against, but Coach Russell was right—those guys were headed to major colleges. Some of them might even end up in the NBA. They wouldn’t even consider Division II ball.
   Then reality hit: college costs big bucks.
   “Coach, my parents don’t have money for something like that.” He smiled. “Ever heard of a scholarship, Jonas? And I mean a full ride—room and board. If you’re not interested, then that’s that. But if you are, I’ll help. Division Two coaches don’t come looking for players. I’ll need to get some game film of you and write you a letter of recommendation. You’ll need to request a copy of your official transcript. If we send all that out to fifty schools, you might get a call or two.” He looked at me from under his bushy eyebrows. “You’ll never know unless you try.”
   
   

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2013

    Important subject handled well.


    Important subject handled well.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2013

    I havent read it

    Looks ok

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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