Sweet Jiminy

( 11 )

Overview

In the throes of a quarter-life crisis, Jiminy abruptly quits law school and flees Chicago for her grandmother Willa's farm in rural Mississippi. In search of respite, Jiminy instead stumbles upon more trouble and turmoil than she ever knew existed.

Jiminy is shocked to discover there was once another Jiminy—the daughter of her grandmother's longtime housekeeper, Lyn—who was murdered along with Lyn's husband four decades earlier in a civil rights era hate crime. With the help of...

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Sweet Jiminy

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Overview

In the throes of a quarter-life crisis, Jiminy abruptly quits law school and flees Chicago for her grandmother Willa's farm in rural Mississippi. In search of respite, Jiminy instead stumbles upon more trouble and turmoil than she ever knew existed.

Jiminy is shocked to discover there was once another Jiminy—the daughter of her grandmother's longtime housekeeper, Lyn—who was murdered along with Lyn's husband four decades earlier in a civil rights era hate crime. With the help of Lyn's nephew Bo, Jiminy sets out to solve the long-ago murder, to the dismay of those who would prefer to let sleeping dogs lie.

In Sweet Jiminy, Kristin Gore has created a lively and compelling story with authentic and genuine Southern characters that will enthrall and entertain listeners.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Worth reading for its original story line and pithy dialogue." —-Kirkus
Publishers Weekly
Gore's watered-down foray into The Help territory features a Southern-born law student whose attempts to solve a decades-old hate crime stir up predictable outrage. After a bike accident, Jiminy Davis takes a leave of absence from law school to head home to Fayeville, Miss., home of her beloved grandmother, Willa. Distraction presents itself in the form of Bo, the med school–bound nephew of Willa's housekeeper, Lyn, until Jiminy stumbles on a long-buried tragedy: her namesake, Lyn's daughter, was killed along with her father in a suspicious accident that was never investigated by the local police. Over her grandmother's objections, Jiminy digs into Fayeville history and, with the help of a scruffy out-of-town lawyer, confronts an ugly truth. Though it contains most of the elements of a legal thriller, Gore's latest (after Sammy's House) lacks the suspense needed to bind the story, while Jiminy's naïveté supplies a weak motivator for dragging out a fairly straightforward mystery. (May)
Entertainment Weekly
"A lighthearted, fun read."
The New York Post

"A delightful read."

Women's Health

"Juicy."

The Los Angeles Times

"Gore has a sardonic sense of write-what-you-know dictum."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781452650982
  • Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/26/2011
  • Format: MP3 on CD
  • Edition description: MP3 - Unabridged CD
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Kristin Gore

Kristin Gore has written for several television shows, including Futurama and Saturday Night Live, and she is the author of the novels Sammy's House and Sammy's Hill.

Hillary Huber garners consistently glowing reviews for her audio work. She has earned several Audie Award nominations, including for A Field of Darkness by Cornelia Read, and she is also an AudioFile Earphones Award winner. AudioFile magazine says, "Hillary Huber's narration is lyrical enough to be set to music."

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2013

    Recommend

    Great storyline and could have been so much more. Lacked richness, but still a good read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Kristin Gore can really write

    Kristin Gore sold me a Blackberry. When I read Kirsten Gore's first book called Sammy's House, I wanted a Blackberry more than anything else: Blackberry was the word in connectedness, front-line communication, and edginess. You could even use it to extend your lovemaking! Washington never looked so interesting.

    Sweet Jiminy is a different type of book altogether. Although Washington doesn't feature prominently, the main character is training to be a lawyer, and the person of interest in her love life is training to be a doctor. But these two aspiring professionals have a problem: they live in the south and they are a mixed-race couple. When Jiminy uncovers an old, unsolved murder involving her boyfriend's relatives, the townspeople have different reactions. Some want to suppress the knowledge, some want to reveal it. No matter what, it is painful for all.

    Readers who liked Stockett's The Help may like to take another walk in similar territory. The author doesn't solve the problems of race in the south, but she illuminates some corner of the issues while telling us of the love which overcomes hate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 15, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Similar territory to Stockett's THE HELP

    Kristin Gore sold me a Blackberry. When I read Sammy's House I wanted a Blackberry more than anything else: Blackberry was the word in connectedness, front-line communication, and edginess. You could even use it to extend your lovemaking! Washington never looked so interesting.

    Sweet Jiminy is a different type of book altogether. Although Washington doesn't feature prominently, the main character is training to be a lawyer, and the person of interest in her love life is training to be a doctor. But these two aspiring professionals have a problem: they live in the south and they are a mixed-race couple. When Jiminy uncovers an old, unsolved murder involving her boyfriend's relatives, the townspeople have different reactions. Some want to suppress the knowledge, some want to reveal it. No matter what, it is painful for all.

    Readers who liked Stockett's The Help may like to take another walk in similar territory. The author doesn't solve the problems of race in the south, but she illuminates some corner of the issues while telling us of the love which overcomes hate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    readers will enjoy this engaging regional tale

    In Chicago, Jiminy Davis attends law school. In the summer she is putting in incredible hours as a legal intern. When a bike rider runs her over she decides it is time to leave. Based on his t-shirt, she chooses her grandma in Fayeville, Mississippi. African-American septuagenarian Lyn Water considers killing herself when her white employer seventy-one year old Willa Hunt asks her to come over to clean the house and get it ready for her granddaughter Jiminy.

    Lyn's great nephew Bo is in town to save money while studying for the MCAT. Meanwhile Jiminy finds her grandpa Henry's diary; he died from an embolism when he was thirty-two. She reads a little only to learn a Jiminy and her father Edward were murdered in 1966, one year before Henry died. Jiminy and Bo meet and she asks him if Lyn ever married; he says yes but her husband and daughter died. They spend a lot time together, which helps her regain her confidence. Attracted to each other, Bo breaks it off with Jiminy out of fear for each of them and their families. Meanwhile she begins to investigate what happened in 1966 before asking Carlo Castaverde, a reporter at the Texarkana Greenhaven Gazette, who has solved seven of these Civil Rights Era abominations, for help.

    The support cast (during the Civil Rights era and present) is solid bringing alive a small southern town struggling with its heritage. However, Jiminy is an interesting individual who forces everyone to look at what happened in 1966 that people want to ignore, she holds the story line together with her never forget attitude. Although the villains come across as weak, readers will enjoy this engaging regional tale as a deadly incident five decades ago that few want to talk about still causes a racial divide.

    Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

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    Posted April 1, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2011

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    Posted October 2, 2011

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    Posted May 5, 2011

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    Posted June 22, 2011

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