Swim with the Sharks without Being Eaten Alive

( 17 )

Overview

This straight-from-the-hip handbook by bestselling author and self-made millionaire Harvey Mackay spells out the path to success for readers everywhere. They will learn how to:

  • Outsell by getting appointments with people who absolutely, positively do not want to see you, and then making them glad they said "yes!"
  • Outmanage by arming yourself with information on prospects, customers, and competitors that the ...
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Overview

This straight-from-the-hip handbook by bestselling author and self-made millionaire Harvey Mackay spells out the path to success for readers everywhere. They will learn how to:

  • Outsell by getting appointments with people who absolutely, positively do not want to see you, and then making them glad they said "yes!"
  • Outmanage by arming yourself with information on prospects, customers, and competitors that the CIA would envy - using a system called the "Mackay 66."
  • Outmotivate by using his insights to help yourself or your kids join the ranks of Amercia's one million millionaires.
  • Outnegotiate by knowing when to "smile and say no" and when to "send in the clones."

This one-of-a-kind book by a businessman who's seen it all and done it all has sold almost 2 million copies, and is the essential roadmap for everyone on the path to success.

You need to know Harvey Mackay because his book reviews the secrets that are the foundation of his extraordinary success.

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Editorial Reviews

Governor - Mario Cuomo
". . .extraordinary intelligence and profound wisdom."
Charles R. Schwab
“. . .I wouldn’t hesitate a minute in taking his advice.”
Ted Koppel
“. . . easy reader ride to success in the business world”
Warren Bennis
“It’s beautifully written, witty, riveting, and the best book about achieving your goals since Dale Carnegie wrote his masterpiece.”
Larry King
“It’s one of the best self-help books I have ever read.”
Donald Trump
“A must for everyone and anyone entering the business world.”
Ken Blanchard
“Swim With The Sharks is an extraordinary treasure chest of information.”
Tom Peters
“Harvey Mackay is a master of brief, biting, and brilliant business wit and wisdom.”
Lou Holtz
“Harvey Mackay may be the most talented man I have met.”
Governor Mario Cuomo
“. . .extraordinary intelligence and profound wisdom.”
Newsweek
“His own story shows that his tips on salesmanship can work.”
Wall Street Journal
“Super-Salesman’s Secrets.”
USA Today
“His book gives to-the-point parables about making your business and personal life a success.”
Newsweek
“His own story shows that his tips on salesmanship can work.”
USA Today
“His book gives to-the-point parables about making your business and personal life a success.”
Wall Street Journal
“Super-Salesman’s Secrets.”
Mario Cuomo
. . .extraordinary intelligence and profound wisdom.
Ted Koppel
. . . easy reader ride to success in the business world.
Charles R. Schwab
. . .I wouldn't hesitate a minute in taking his advice.
Library Journal
First-time author Mackay has produced a ``how-to'' book that is different. Offering a series of lessons with titles like, ``If You Don't Have a Destination, You'll Never Get There,'' or ``Make Decisions with Your Heart and What You'll End Up with Is Heart Disease,'' he tells parables that make the point more by example than by just giving advice. How Mackay got Morrow to print 100,000 copies of his book and give himan unknown writera six-figure advance and a $150,000 promotion budget is as interesting as how he outflanked Calvin Griffith to keep the Twins in Minnesota. Highly recommended for most public and academic libraries. Michael D. Kathman, St. John's Univ. Lib., Collegeville, Minn.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060742812
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/18/2005
  • Series: Collins Business Essentials Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 104,411
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.64 (d)

Meet the Author

Harvey Mackey is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and of the Stanford Executive Program, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. He is the chairman and chief executive officer of Mackey Envelope Corporation. He is an internationally renowned public speaker, an avid runner and marathoner, and a number-one-ranked tennis player in Minnesota.

He and his wife, Carol Ann, have three children and live in Shorewood, a suburb of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One


I'd Like 15,000 Tickets For
Tonight's Game Please



The fifteen minutes of fame that the late Andy Warhol promised each of us came to me in the spring of 1984. 1 was the point man in a nationally publicized effort to outflank Calvin Griffith, the owner of the Minnesota Twins baseball team. Griffith wanted to sell his ball club to a group of Florida businesspeople who would have moved the Twins to Tampa. Another group, consisting of Twin Cities people, with which I was involved, wanted to keep the club there, under local ownership — and see to it that we didn't get caught up in a very expensive bidding war.

Unlike Calvin, we had a secret weapon: Bill Veeck.

In case you don't know who Bill Veeck is, he was the man who, in 1951, as owner of the hapless St. Louis Browns, staged an innocent-appearing promotion that so upset the baseball establishment — and so endeared him to baseball fans — that for as long as the game is played, he will be remembered as the man who "sent a midget to bat."

At three feet, seven inches and sixty-five pounds, Eddie Gaedel, ordinarily a vaudeville performer, gave the Browns one of their rare distinctions. He was the first and only certifiable midget to appear in a major-league baseball game. For the record, he walked on four straight pitches and upon reaching first base was replaced immediately by a pinch runner. True to form, the runner was stranded on third and the Browns lost the game. But from the uproar Veeck had created you would have thought he'd called Babe Ruth a transvestite.

Veeck also operated five baseball clubs, three inthe majors and two in the minors, won pennants, set major-league attendance records, was the promotional genius who helped innovate bat night, glove night, fan appreciation night, players' names on uniforms, exploding scoreboards, the ivy-covered walls of the Wrigley Field bleachers, the expansion of the major leagues, the unrestricted draft, and such yet-to-be-adopted proposals as interleague play.

In a word, he was a visionary. In another word, he was a maverick. My first contact with Veeck was simple enough. I picked up the phone and called him. Veeck prided himself on being totally accessible to anyone. Unlike most club owners, Veeck roamed the stands, schmoozing with his customers, instead of hiding out in a private box, à la Steinbrenner. Veeck had opinions on just about everything, and he loved to lay them on anyone who would listen.

As the situation in the Twin Cities began to unfold, I found myself calling Veeck almost daily. Here's what we were up against: Griffith had an escape clause in his stadium lease that permitted him to cancel if the Twins' attendance did not reach 4.2 million fans over a three-year period. Thanks to an inferior product, attendance over the previous two years had been so bad that by the end of the 1984 season the Twins would have had to draw 2.4 million to reach the 4.2 million total. However, if the total was reached, Griffith would be bound to his lease, and to Minnesota, for three more years.

Though he'd be free once again to leave after each three-year stint, he knew and we knew that once he had announced his desire to leave, the already disgruntled fans would turn on his shoddy product with a vengeance, and he would be forced to endure another three years of horrendous attendance and red ink.

So, unwilling to spend the money necessary to improve the team, he was determined to sell. Just as we were determined to see that the Twins hit 2.4 million in attendance in 1984. And he had only one group to sell to: us.

Our problem was that 2.4 million was an almost impossible goal. Veeck had set a major-league record that stood for fifteen years when he drew 2.8 million with a pennant-winning club in Cleveland. Less than a month into the 1984 season, it was clear the Minnesota Twins were going nowhere.

Confident that there was nothing anyone in Minneapolis or St. Paul could do to bind Griffith to his lease, in late April the Florida group endeared themselves to Griffith. They accomplished this by ridding him of a longtime antagonist, Gabe Murphy, when they bought Murphy's 43 percent minority interest in the club for $11 million.

Griffith then announced that he was open to all offers for his majority interest as long as they were for at least $50 million, which is what the pennant-contending Detroit club had just sold for. Calvin then sat back waiting for the bidding war to unfold between Tampa and Minnesota for the remaining stock.

What he hadn't counted on was the tenacity of the Twin Cities community and the long memory of Bill Veeck. Twenty-five years earlier, Veeck, as the owner of the Chicago White Sox, had voted at an American League meeting in favor of Griffith's move of the Washington Senators franchise to Minnesota. In exchange, Veeck felt he had an agreement from Griffith to support Veeck's bid for an expansion franchise in newly vacated Washington. To Veeck's mind, Griffith reneged on the deal when he voted for another group. It was an act Veeck would not forget. He devoted an entire chapter of his autobiography, Veeck as in Wreck, to Griffithian duplicity, a topic that also included another ancient wound inflicted years earlier when Griffith's uncle, Clark Griffith, supposedly reneged on a promise to let Veeck move the Browns' franchise to Baltimore.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 19 of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    This is a must read for anyone who wants to succeed in business and in life.

    The headline says it all. This book is a great asset to all who want to thrive in the business world. There are also lessons that you can carry over into your personal life as well. It is informative and interesting. This book was suggested to me from a very successful business man who used Harvey's ideas to the fullest. Happy reading!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2009

    Good Read for young salespeople

    I shared this book with my young sales staff. I read it when I first started in sales. It has good pearls of wisdom. We shared comments and compared it to our current sales challenges. It was an easy read;therefore, everyone found time to read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2008

    Successful Bits-n-Pieces

    Swim With the Sharks is a collection of business tales and advice from prominent Minnesota businessman Harvey Mackay. Mackay got started in the highly competitive envelope field and was able to succeed, it appears, through solid business acumen and sheer determination. Swim With the Sharks was his first writing effort, and its success is probably due to the timeless, solid advice he imparts as well as the folksy manner in which he imparts it. There are plenty of tales of Mackay's early struggles and successes in the business world, although his involvement with the University of Minnesota's athletic recruiting scandal of the 1970s is notably absent. The book is somewhat haphazardly organized, with extremely short chapters -- some are a mere paragraph -- centered on various business-world lessons, but the material makes the read worthwhile. Non-business folk may enjoy this as well, and his principles for success could apply easily to most endeavors.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2002

    Great book and easy read.

    I thought the book was great. It was an easy read and full of common sence ideas that I never thought of. I don't read very much but this may get me started. I'm self employed and I think it will help me in my bussiness and people skills.

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