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Swimming with Sharks: The Daring Discoveries of Eugenie Clark
     

Swimming with Sharks: The Daring Discoveries of Eugenie Clark

by Heather Lang, Jordi Solano (Illustrator)
 

Before Eugenie Clark's groundbreaking research, most people thought sharks were vicious, blood-thirsty killers. From the first time she saw a shark in an aquarium, Japanese-American Eugenie was enthralled. Instead of frightening and ferocious eating machines, she saw sleek, graceful fish gliding through the water. After she became a scientist—an unexpected

Overview


Before Eugenie Clark's groundbreaking research, most people thought sharks were vicious, blood-thirsty killers. From the first time she saw a shark in an aquarium, Japanese-American Eugenie was enthralled. Instead of frightening and ferocious eating machines, she saw sleek, graceful fish gliding through the water. After she became a scientist—an unexpected career path for a woman in the 1940s—she began taking research dives and training sharks, earning her the nickname "The Shark Lady."

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Lang's welcome picture-book biography introduces a trailblazing female scientist…A clear, well-organized presentation likely to make readers and listeners want to know more about the 'Shark Lady' and her favorite creatures." Kirkus Reviews, November 1, 2016

"Eugenie Clark’s interest in sharks began early in life, when regular visits to the New York Aquarium led not to a fear of the giant fish but a fascination....an author’s note provides more in-depth information on Genie, including a discussion of the discrimination she faced as both a woman and a Japanese American." Booklist, December 1, 2016

"Lang's wonder-filled narrative makes for an inspiring tale of a successful female scientist, with a decided emphasis on her successes…An excellent addition to any collection, particularly those looking to expand their stories of women in STEM." School Library Journal, November 1, 2016

School Library Journal
11/01/2016
K-Gr 3—This engaging and richly illustrated picture book biography depicts scientist Eugenie Clark's groundbreaking work with sharks. Using clear, kid-friendly prose with just the right amount of scientific detail, Lang introduces readers to Clark as a young child transfixed by sharks at the New York Aquarium. Focused on becoming an ichthyologist (a fish scientist) and undeterred by the lack of women in her field, Clark took every relevant class available, earning a master's degree in zoology. Soon, the ocean was her classroom, and as she explored the underwater world, she collected and observed as much data as she could. In 1955, Clark opened the Cape Haze Marine Laboratory in Florida, where her work with sharks developed even further, earning her the nickname "Shark Lady." Lang's wonder-filled narrative makes for an inspiring tale of a successful female scientist, with a decided emphasis on her successes. An author's note mentions some discrimination Clark faced as a woman and a Japanese American. However, this is not addressed in the main text. Nevertheless, students will enjoy this account of a scientist's close work with such fearsome creatures. Solano's gorgeous illustrations, done in a soothing, muted palette of greens and blues, suggest the ocean and enhance this selection's appeal. VERDICT An excellent addition to any collection, particularly those looking to expand their stories of women in STEM.—Kristy Pasquariello, Wellesley Free Library, MA
Kirkus Reviews
2016-10-11
Fascinated with sharks from childhood, Eugenie Clark spent a lifetime researching these "magnificent and misunderstood" creatures.At a time when women were discouraged from even entering professional fields, Eugenie Clark (1922-2015) pioneered shark research in and out of the water. She swam with sharks of all sorts. She opened the Cape Haze Marine Laboratory (now Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium) in Florida and proved that they could be trained. She dove into caves to see fearsome requiem sharks quietly being cleaned by tiny remora fish. Lang's welcome picture-book biography introduces a trailblazing female scientist to very young readers and listeners. She demonstrates young Genie's early passion by describing her weekly visits to the New York Aquarium, her childhood apartment full of fish and reptiles, and her habit of taking notes. She goes on to summarize a long, productive career with a few well-chosen examples. Her story is nicely rounded in text and illustrations with scenes showing Clark with her nose against the glass in the New York Aquarium as a child and from a submersible as an adult. Solano's illustrations, mostly double-page spreads, emphasize the darkness and mystery of the underwater world; occasionally they include faux notebook pages with simple facts about the species. The prejudice Clark experienced as a Japanese-American is revealed only in the author's note, however. A clear, well-organized presentation likely to make readers and listeners want to know more about the "Shark Lady" and her favorite creatures. (more about sharks, selected sources) (Picture book/biography. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807521878
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
12/01/2016
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
575,124
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
770L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Heather Lang is the author of several picture books including The Original Cowgirl and Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman, Olympic High-Jump Champion. She lives in Massachusetts.

Jordi Solano never leaves home without a sketchbook and pencil. He lives in Spain.

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