The Sword of Medina: A Novel

The Sword of Medina: A Novel

3.0 2
by Sherry Jones
     
 

Before dying, Muhammad left his jeweled sword, al-Ma'thur, to A'isha, telling her to use it in the jihad to come. But what if the jihad is against her own people? After 20 years of distrust and anger, can A'isha and Ali come together to preserve the future of their people and their faith--or will their hatred of each other destroy everything Muhammad worked to build?…  See more details below

Overview

Before dying, Muhammad left his jeweled sword, al-Ma'thur, to A'isha, telling her to use it in the jihad to come. But what if the jihad is against her own people? After 20 years of distrust and anger, can A'isha and Ali come together to preserve the future of their people and their faith--or will their hatred of each other destroy everything Muhammad worked to build? This climactic sequel to the controversial [i]The Jewel of Medina[/i] returns to 7th century Arabia to discover whether, after fighting a civil war, a people can ever truly heal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780825305207
Publisher:
Beaufort Books, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/15/2009
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

Videos

Meet the Author

Since the publication of her controversial first novel, [i]The Jewel of Medina[/i], Sherry Jones has spoken to audiences around the world on censorship, freedom of speech and the many issues around fictionalizing the lives of historical figures. [i]The Sword of Medina[/i] is her second novel.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Sword of Medina: A Novel 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
IanPage More than 1 year ago
I just finished the Sword of Medina - it was compelling, entertaining and a fun way to increase my knowledge of Islam. The fast paced presentation of Aisha and Ali `s personalities and intentions gave me an intimate insight into two of history's most influential people. The Sword of Medina is well written and intelligent, combining playfulness with painful human decisions. I identified with Aisha and Ali's struggles to assume both competing and complementary positions of power amid the intrigue of trust, deceit and misunderstanding that caused the Battle of the Camel -Islam's historic civil war. Again historical fiction is more fascinating than purely imagination based literature.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The sequel to one of the worst examples of controversy-seeking trash fiction is now available. If you read "The Jewel of Medina" and didn't think a worse case of literary self-absorption could be manifested, then by all means read Jones' latest attempt to incite a firestorm of controversy. This is pretty much what you would expect from someone who calls herself a journalist and whose contributions to journalism are tour guides for motorcyclists. If you want to read a squalid romance novel, hacked with a machete out of a mountain of melted purple crayon, now's your chance. Note: The other THREE 5-star reviews are from reviewers whose only other review is...guess what?...Jones' other book, the Jewel of Medina. And those reviews were posted prior to the release date. Friends, relatives and former coworkers...what would a talentless hack author do without them? If you have any need to read a fictional account of the life of Mohammed and Aisha, your interests will be much better served by reading "The Mother of the Believers," by Kamran Pasha. If nothing else, at least he knows how to write. If you want to know what Sherry Jones was thinking when she wrote her books, you need merely Google "Sherry Jones" and "Blic" to read her article "I wrote my novel to honor Islam" and you will have it straight from the horse's mouth. I've no doubt we can all agree that Islam needs a lot more honoring for its contributions to homophobia, sex discrimination and its world-famous stance on human rights. Every time I read of a child hung with piano wire in Iran, or a Filipino beheaded in Saudi Arabia for practicing witchcraft, I feel an intense need to honor Islam. Why, even the recent contribution to "bridge building" between the Muslim and non-Muslim world at Fort Hood has been solidified by one of that religion's adherents. There's just so much about Islam that makes its founder prime material for a romance novel. Thank goodness we have Sherry Jones to give us an asinine cartoon representation of the founder of the world's most intolerant religion, in a prose style lifted from the dumpster behind the Harlequin Romance building. If this woman wants to "honor Islam," she need merely convert to Islam, get stuffed into an abbaya & chadour and keep her mouth shut until she dies. That might not sit well with her concept of feminism, but as an attempt to "honor Islam," it resounds with far more sincerity than the penning of a prose version of the Mohammed cartoons. I eagerly await the third in this series: THE HONOR KILLING OF MEDINA. It's about Aisha as a teenager walking the streets when a gust of wind blows her abbaya so that a spot of ankle is seen by one and all. Having sullied the escutcheon of a once proud family, the bratty little tart is buried up to her neck and stoned to death. Mohammed's honor is restored and everyone lives happily ever after. With the amount of anti-female violence in the Muslim world, some wonder where the feminists are. They're in Spokane, WA, writing love stories about Mohammed. Honor, indeed.