Sword Quest (Swordbird Series #2) [NOOK Book]

Overview

One magical sword. Two rivals.

Wind-voice the half-dove, formerly enslaved, is now free, and Maldeor, the one-winged archaeopteryx, hungers for supreme power. The adversaries will both embark on their own epic quest to find the sword that will determine the future of birdkind. An exciting prequel to the New York Times bestseller Swordbird.

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Sword Quest (Swordbird Series #2)

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Overview

One magical sword. Two rivals.

Wind-voice the half-dove, formerly enslaved, is now free, and Maldeor, the one-winged archaeopteryx, hungers for supreme power. The adversaries will both embark on their own epic quest to find the sword that will determine the future of birdkind. An exciting prequel to the New York Times bestseller Swordbird.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
This high-flying prequel to Swordbird unfolds the story of how Wind-voice found his magical sword. Sword Quest features numerous characters, both new and familiar.
Children's Literature - Laura Ruttig
Birds form the unusual topic of this quest novel, which begins with a prophecy that foretells the coming of a great hero. The archaeopteryxes' dark empire is growing, and they have turned even the strongest species of birds, such as the crows, into slaves. 013-Unidentified, a strange white bird, is held in their captivity at the start of the book. As he struggles to free a fellow prisoner, he suddenly recalls the name his mother gave him, Wind-Voice. He escapes and grows strong again, reclaiming his true identity as Wind-Voice. Throughout the novel, he journeys across the land to stop the evil Maldeor from reaching the Hero's Sword. This is a novel about recognizing the hero within and understanding what is truly important in life—such as family, friends, and peace, rather than power or treasure. Yi Fan's writing is outstanding given her young age. I also loved Rioux's exceptional pencil-drawn illustrations, which bring charming life to the characters. Together, they make this book an entertaining flight of the imagination. Reviewer: Laura Ruttig
VOYA - Angelica Delgado
Long ago, the Great Spirit of the birds, saddened because of incessant war and strife, cried tears that transformed into gemstones when they fell from the heavens. In the land below, an avian blacksmith fashioned a sword with a sacred gemstone at its hilt. The communities that received the jewels guarded them as treasure until the power-hungry archaeopteryxes began to steal them. In a shadowy realm, an exiled bird forged a bond with a ghostly menace in exchange for a chance to regain his glory and ruin his opponents. Now prophecies abound that on Hero's Day, a messianic bird will appear to wield the sword and save them all. Wind-voice the slave bands together with his friends to find the remaining stones. In an epic struggle for the treasure, friends become enemies, enemies forge alliances, and every bird stands for himself. Sadly this sequel to Fan's avian saga Swordbird (HarperCollins, 2007/VOYA April 2007) will not ensnare new aficionados to the talking-animal genre. The book has similar elements that made its predecessor successful-a dictatorial overlord and a humble hero accompanied by wacky, intrepid friends. Yet the book combines the overabundance of winsome characters with an overwrought narrative and flimsy allegory. It verges on hagiography to the extent that Wind-voice is tiresomely good, noble, and boring. Dastardly opponent Maldeor, while not victorious, is at least interesting. Short chapters and copious illustrations make this one a speedy, although uncompelling, read. Save some money unless fans request this one. Reviewer: Angelica Delgado
School Library Journal

Gr 3-7

In this prequel (HarperCollins, 2008) to Swordbird (HarperCollins, 2007), Nancy Yi Fan reveals the origin of the legendary bird that serves as savior to the world of birds. Although the moral values imbedded in the story are sometimes handled in a heavy-handed and didactic style, Yi Fan manages to weave a fascinating story about four birds on a quest to locate a magical sword. On their journey, they gain insight into their own strengths and frailties. While the novel is fascinating, the audio version is a disappointment. Janellen Steininger, the narrator, does not have the vocal range to adequately portray the multitude of characters in the story. Except for Maldeor, the evil one-winged archaeopteryx, all the voices sound essentially the same. As a result, the text sounds stilted and juvenile. There is the additional problem of the lack of background music for the songs of the birds. For libraries where the first book is popular, purchase the print version only.-Connie M. Pierce, Falling Water Elementary School, Chattanooga, TN

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061757259
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Series: Swordbird Series , #2
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 334,165
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Nancy Yi Fan is the New York Times bestselling author of Swordbird and Sword Quest. She appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show as one of the World's Smartest Kids and on The Martha Stewart Show. Nancy spent part of her childhood in China, where she was born in 1993. Birds have been a lifelong passion of hers and provided the inspiration for her novels. She began writing her first novel, Swordbird, when she was eleven years old. Nancy attends Harvard University.

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Read an Excerpt

Sword Quest

Chapter One

Loss

Hungrias II, the Ancient Wing, emperor of the archaeopteryxes, sprawled like a huge spider on his whalebone perch. He was staring out of a rounded window at the forests of Castlewood, but his eyes reflected the world. "Secrets. Delicious!" he declared, his bloated face squished into furrows. "No secrets can sneak past my mighty empire's eyes and ears. Yes, go on!" Down the great golden hall of the Sun Palace, the rows of plumes on the leather headgear of his knights all dipped forward as the subjects leaned in to listen. Across from them, his scholars swished their sleeves.

"The lowly birds in your territories are starting to whisper about rare gemstones. Leasorn gems, they're called," the head of the scholars said. "They have strange markings on them. It is said they come from the sky and have something to do with a hero. One in particular, our sources reveal, seems to hint at when the hero will come—sometime in three years." The members of the court gasped. The scholar spread the claws of one foot wide in wonderment, then closed them abruptly. He pointed at a ragamuffin twitching beside him. "I have found a witness, Your Majesty!"

"Speak."

"Yes, Your Majesty!" the young archaeopteryx said. "I chanced to see that particular stone during my morning foraging. 'Thank the Great Spirit the gem is here,' one of the birds around it was saying, so I knew something was peculiar. I hid and watched . . ."

Magical stones from the sky! thought the emperor, his gaze sweeping across the sunset painted on the arched ceiling.

"Color! Location! Tribe!" Hungrias's eyesglittered as if two gemstones were already in his pupils. "Speak up!"

"Beautifully orange it was, Your Majesty. It's about a couple dozen miles south of your Plains territory, with a band of doves living near a river."

Sounds like something for me. Hero, the wise bird said? Well, I'll show how archaeopteryxes can crush all heroes! "I must have this treasure." Drumming his sausagelike talons, Hungrias straightened on his jeweled perch and barked, "Sir Maldeor!"

"Yes, Your Majesty." The head of the knights stepped forward on the carpet and bowed.

"Take some elite soldiers and find this gem for me."

Before the knight could reply, the curtains behind Hungrias's throne trembled and a fat feathered ball waddled up to the emperor. "Me too!" Prince Phaëthon cried, his beak full. In his claws he held a blueberry muffin. "I shall go along. I must!"

"You're young. Battles are not for you."

"I must! I want to learn how to fight. Please, Father!" the prince begged, crumbs on his beak.

Hungrias's tiny eyes flitted shut. Then he huffed and said, "Sir Maldeor, I entrust my son to you."

Phaëthon grinned with green-tinged teeth.

Good grief, thought the knight. "Yes, Your Majesty," he managed to say.

The next day, Sir Maldeor, Prince Phaëthon, and thirty soldiers journeyed to the dove tribe.

Easy picking, Maldeor thought when they arrived. The squat, knobbly olive trees where the tribe lived did not seem to present a threat, but because of the prince, precautions had to be taken. "Stay behind the first line," Maldeor whispered.

"Why? I hate that!" shouted the prince, surprising a dove named Irene coming back from a morning flight. She rushed toward her tribe, shouting, "Archaeopteryxes! They're coming, they're coming!"

Surprise plan foiled! Maldeor spat in disgust and flipped his long tail to signal the charge. As if that weren't enough, as the soft fluttering wings of the defending doves obscured the olive trees beyond, Phaëthon whined in the knight's ear, "Can I find the gem?"

"No, Prince. Not now."

Why did the prince want to come in the first place? I can't be a nursemaid and a knight at the same time, Maldeor thought as he muttered plans to a group of his soldiers. With a nod, they formed into a tight ball prickling with spears and flew directly at the biggest olive tree. An old dove was frantically burying the gemstone in a hollow of the tree. Beside him stood Irene, the bird who had forewarned their tribe.

The knight aimed for the Leasorn gem, but the old dove jumped and kicked Maldeor's face with his pink claws. Maldeor bit one toe and hung on. The old dove tried to beat Maldeor off, but he was too small to have much chance. One of Maldeor's soldiers swung a club.

"Flee, my daughter!" the old dove gasped, and died.

"No!" Irene shrieked. Sobbing, she tensed her neck and, with a mighty flap of her wings, dived at Maldeor's claws, which now held the gemstone. Maldeor whooped in pain. The stone sailed out of his grip, out of the olive tree, and landed a way off, in a sandy ditch. With grunts and Yahh!s, the birds propelled themselves madly toward it. Maldeor forgot the dove and scrambled to see. He sighed in relief when he saw that an archaeopteryx reached the gem first. "Yes!"

But it was none other than the prince. Turning in the direction of Maldeor, he lifted the gem up in the air. "I have found the gem!" Phaëthon pronounced, gloating.

You little bother! Maldeor grumbled angrily to himself and gripped his sword tighter. He gave a curt order to his soldiers to kill all the doves they could find. The foolish birds would have to pay for their defiance of the emperor—and Maldeor would have to go and get the prince. If only he hadn't agreed to bring the brat here. As if in answer to his hidden wishes, a dark shadow suddenly loomed from the grove of birches behind the prince.

Now, this was no dove or archaeopteryx. It was the last of the long-lived flying creatures who had four wings. This intelligent creature, neither reptile nor bird, had blundered along in the darkness of the bracken for years and years and years, revealing himself to his contemporary cousins only when necessity called. Lizard eyes staring, he scanned the battleground he had just come across and focused on a young, tender specimen. A bigger bite than the doves, he thought. The evil cogwheels in his ancient brain whirled as he calculated.

Sword Quest. Copyright © by Nancy Fan. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

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(15)

4 Star

(6)

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(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2012

    Awesome book. Love it!

    I have owned this book for a couple of years and i never get tired of reading it. It is my favorite out of the two books. Lots of adventure and i also love the illistrations. Great for readers 9-13. I think it is amazing that the author was so young when she wrote this book. She is a very talented young girl. I would definately reccommend this book to readers young and old. It it great for bird lovers also.

    Wind-voice is a young dove who loses his mother. He is taken into captivity by the bad birds. He serves them as a slave until he meets a bird there and together they escape from them. There were (in the beginning of the book), stones, that dropped from the sky. One of them fell into a magical sword that a pheonix king made to bring peace. Whoever finds the sword will be a great and powerfull bird. The bad bird finds out about this and wants to find it before the destined hero so he can be the ruler. Wind voice has to find it before he does in order for the hero to claim it. Little does he know that the hero is really himself.

    Thats as good as i can do explaining it. It is better than it sounds. I know you will enjoy the book as much as i did! God bless!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2012

    Hi

    I am just womdering, does this book have a character in it called Stormac? Does ANYONE know of a book with a bird character called Stormac? Seriously, this is really important!!!

    This book was even better than the first. She's a great writer.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 7, 2011

    Sword quest

    This is a great book full of adventer if you like short books with adventer read this

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 31, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Would be a great summer read

    The first thing to remember when picking up this book is that the author is young (13), so there are some descriptions and sentence structures that seem a little too simple. However, the book is a decent length with beautiful illustrations and a varied vocabulary which make up for its (very few) faults. The story follows Wind-Voice and his friends as they embark on a quest to find a hero and end the oppression of the archaeopteryxes, a kind of toothed prehistoric bird. The author crams a lot of plot into 212 pages, and I think that both reluctant readers and young readers would enjoy this book as a summer read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    AMAZING

    I'm sorry i didn't really read this book, but i looked at the cover and thought " This 30-year old person must have wrote a pretty good book. " Then I looked at the back of the book and saw a 12 year old girls picture. That insprired me to keep writing my book. I am also 12 and love books. I am writing a story and didn't know if i'd finish it and if i did would it get into a library? But this inpired me to actually create an account and write this review.

    Thanks for writing this book, Zack

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 9, 2009

    It's okay...

    Nancy Yi Fan is an author that knows a lot about birds. Her story had a lot of descriptive words and plenty of action, but not only did the action end as soon as it started - but the book itself did not keep me at the edge of my seat. Was it a good book? Sure. But in the beginning, it was confusing because Nancy hardly detailed about the setting, the birds and such. I understand Nancy's desire for peace, but I really don't think Swordbird was the best book I've ever read. It was okay, and I enjoyed reading it but I would not reccommend it to anyone else. This is only my opinion, but I urge people to read this book and decide for themselves.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2008

    AWSOME!

    This book is the second best book I have ever read. The first is DEFINITALEY Swordbird.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    Skit123

    Awesome so far.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2013

    Readit

    Super exsided about this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Realy good book

    This book is really good!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2012

    I hope i luv it

    I read the first book so i hope this is just as AWSOME!!!!!!if it isnt good then im goin to be mad cause i have only ten bucks on my credit card

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2012

    Awesome

    It is sooooooooooooo fiuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuun so readit

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2012

    Metalbeak

    Best Book Ever and very exciting

    IN SWORDBIRD WE TRUST!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2012

    Sword quest

    I think it shows detail and adventure. I thought it was very facinating that a 12 year old wrote this masterpiece. Even though it is the prequal to Sword Bird, it is a very good book.




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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2011

    AWESOME!!!!

    This is probably the best book I ever read! I couldn't put it down. I recomend it to anyone who knows a good book whe they see one!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2009

    It's okay...

    This book is okay, as I said in the title. There are some story mistakes that messed it up and got me thinking, though. It has good illustrations, and they look 1% cartoonish to me, like with shiny eyes and etc, and has a good/okay plot, but with some small mistakes that sorta mess it up.

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  • Posted November 29, 2008

    Kind of Good,Not reccomended

    I read the first book by Nancy Yi Fan- Swordbird- and didn't like it that much since it basicaly fllows the same story line as redwall and was really really predictable. I read this thinking it might be better but found nothing new.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2008

    Okay

    I thought it was okay, but I'd really recommend Arianna Kelt instead. The author is also a teen and he's a better write.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2008

    Swordquest is ...

    This is a great book.If you like adventure and fantisy,read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2008

    AWESOME SEQUEL!!

    This book was a great seqeul to Swordbird. If you've read -and liked- Swordbird, read this book and you'll be pleased!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews

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