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Sylvia's Lovers
     

Sylvia's Lovers

3.3 4
by Elizabeth Gaskell, Shirley Foster (Introduction)
 

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A was powerfully moving novel of a young woman caught between the attractions of two very different men, Sylvia’s Lovers is set in the 1790s in an English seaside town. England is at war with France, and press-gangs wreak havoc by seizing young men for service. One of their victims is a whaling harpooner named Charley Kinraid, whose charm and vivacity have

Overview

A was powerfully moving novel of a young woman caught between the attractions of two very different men, Sylvia’s Lovers is set in the 1790s in an English seaside town. England is at war with France, and press-gangs wreak havoc by seizing young men for service. One of their victims is a whaling harpooner named Charley Kinraid, whose charm and vivacity have captured the heart of Sylvia Robson. But Sylvia’s devoted cousin, Philip Hepburn, hopes to marry her himself and, in order to win her, deliberately withholds crucial information—with devastating consequences.

  • The introduction discusses the novel's historical and geographical authenticity, as well as its innovative treatment of gender and human relationships

  • Includes a new chronology, updated further reading, notes, and appendices

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140434224
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/28/1997
Series:
World's Classics Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
528
Sales rank:
753,526
Product dimensions:
5.03(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.91(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was born in London in 1810, but she spent her formative years in Cheshire, Stratford-upon-Avon and the north of England. In 1832 she married the Reverend William Gaskell, who became well known as the minister of the Unitarian Chapel in Manchester’s Cross Street. As well as leading a busy domestic life as minister’s wife and mother of four daughters, she worked among the poor, traveled frequently and wrote. Mary Barton (1848) was her first success.

Two years later she began writing for Dickens’s magazine, Household Words, to which she contributed fiction for the next thirteen years, notably a further industrial novel, North and South (1855). In 1850 she met and secured the friendship of Charlotte Brontë. After Charlotte’s death in March 1855, Patrick Brontë chose his daughter’s friend and fellow-novelist to write The Life of Charlotte Brontë (1857), a probing and sympathetic account, that has attained classic stature. Elizabeth Gaskell’s position as a clergyman’s wife and as a successful writer introduced her to a wide circle of friends, both from the professional world of Manchester and from the larger literary world. Her output was substantial and completely professional. Dickens discovered her resilient strength of character when trying to impose his views on her as editor of Household Words. She proved that she was not to be bullied, even by such a strong-willed man.

Her later works, Sylvia’s Lovers (1863), Cousin Phillis (1864) and Wives and Daughters (1866) reveal that she was continuing to develop her writing in new literary directions. Elizabeth Gaskell died suddenly in November 1865.

Shirley Foster teaches at the University of Sheffield.

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Sylvia's Lovers 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Dominican More than 1 year ago
Silvia's Lovers is a beautifully written story with good characters. It is a tale of love and loss and a kind of redemption. It was a bit overlong for the theme, but kept my interest even though I did not care for the heroine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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