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Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives [NOOK Book]

Overview

Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives provides a philosophical and psychological interpretation of the major symbols of the theosophical Kabbalah. It shows that the Kabbalah, particularly as it is expressed in the school of Isaac Luria, provides a coherent and comprehensive account of the cosmos, and humanity's role within it, that is intellectually, morally, and spiritually significant for contemporary life.
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Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives

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Overview

Symbols of the Kabbalah: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives provides a philosophical and psychological interpretation of the major symbols of the theosophical Kabbalah. It shows that the Kabbalah, particularly as it is expressed in the school of Isaac Luria, provides a coherent and comprehensive account of the cosmos, and humanity's role within it, that is intellectually, morally, and spiritually significant for contemporary life.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781461734154
  • Publisher: Aronson, Jason Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/1/1999
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 436
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Sanford L. Drob is Director of Psychological Assessment and the Senior Forensic Psychologist at Bellevue Hospital in New York. He holds doctorate degrees in Philosophy from Boston University and in Clinical Psychology from Long Island University. In 1987 he co-founded, and for several years served as editor-in-chief of, the New York Jewish Review, a publication addressing the interface between traditional Judaism and contemporary thought. In addition to numerous publications in clinical, forensic, and philosophical psychology, Dr. Drob's articles on Jewish philosophy have appeared in such journals as Tradition, The Reconstructionist, and Cross Currents. His philosophical and psychological interests originally led him to the study of Chassidus. For the past fifteen years he has engaged in intensive study of the Kabbalah, the problems of God, Mind, and Evil, and the relationship between Jewish mysticism and other traditions in the history of Western and Eastern thought.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2001

    A Kabbalistic Theology

    This is a thoughtful and detailed account of the theosophical Kabbalah written by an author who is not only very well versed in Jewish mysisticism but who holds doctorates in both philosophy and psychology. An introductory chapter focuses on the author's overall approach to the Kabbalah and subsequent chapters are each devoted to a specific Kabbalistic symbol/idea, e.g. Ein-sof (the Infinite God), Sefirot (divine archetypes), Tikkun ha-Olam (the Restoration of the World). The result is a comprehensive and systematic Kabbalistic theology, which not only explains the Kabbalistic symbols but provides the reader with an overaching view of God, the World, Man, and the meaning of human existence, from a Kabbalistic point of view. Although no previous knowledge of the Kabbalah is required this is a serious, philosophically minded work rather than a pop or New Age book on Jewish mysticism.

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