Symphonic Repertoire: Volume 3. Part A. The European Symphony, ca. 1800-ca. 1930, in Germany and the Nordic Countries, Vol. 3A

Overview

The third volume to appear in the magnum opus of A. Peter Brown takes as its topic the European symphony ca. 1800?ca. 1930 and is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on the symphonies of Germany and the Nordic countries and discusses in great detail the symphonies of Weber, Spohr, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Lindblad, Berwald, Svendsen, Gade, Nielsen, Sibelius, Berlioz, Liszt, Raff, and Strauss. Volume 3B will examine the symphonies of Great Britain, Russia, and France ...

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Overview

The third volume to appear in the magnum opus of A. Peter Brown takes as its topic the European symphony ca. 1800–ca. 1930 and is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on the symphonies of Germany and the Nordic countries and discusses in great detail the symphonies of Weber, Spohr, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Lindblad, Berwald, Svendsen, Gade, Nielsen, Sibelius, Berlioz, Liszt, Raff, and Strauss. Volume 3B will examine the symphonies of Great Britain, Russia, and France during the same period.

Brown’s series synthesizes an enormous amount of scholarly literature in a wide range of languages. It presents current overviews of the status of research, discusses important former or remaining problems of attribution, illuminates the style of specific works and their contexts, and samples early writings on their reception.

Indiana University Press

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Written with wry good humor, this scholarly volume uncovers a rich world of previously under-appreciated masterpieces. Serious students of music—whether student, performer, conductor, or avid listener—will find this latest volume in this masterful series both informative and readable.... Essential." —M. Neil, Augustana College (IL), Choice, November 2008

"This work is highly recommended for all larger public and academic libraries, and smaller libraries with specialized music collections. ... conductors, musicologists, and others connected with symphonic music would certainly benefit from having these volumes in their libraries." —Robert L. Wick, American Reference Books Annual

Choice
When complete, this series will be the most exhaustive study available of the symphony in the Western tradition. This release shares with its predecessors (v. 2, CH, Apr'03, 40-4510; v. 4, CH, Mar'04, 41-3953; v.3, part B, CH, Sep'08, 46-0179) a brilliance of detail. Like the earlier releases, this volume provides complete analyses of each symphony, details of first performances, and rich bibliographic resources. Moreover, Brown (who died before part B of this volume was complete) discusses formal and technical detail in a comparative way, placing each work in the context not only of its composer, but of time and place. Examining areas of compositional creativity other than Vienna (volumes 2 and 4 concern the rich Viennese tradition), Brown analyzes the works of Franz Berwald, Joachim Raff, Mikhail Glinka and other relative unknowns and also calls attention to the influence of Mendelssohn (as mentor) and Rachmaninoff (as contrapuntalist). Written with wry good humor, this scholarly volume uncovers a rich world of previously under-appreciated masterpieces. Serious students of music—whether student, performer, conductor, or avid listener—will find this latest volume in this masterful series both informative and readable. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers.M. Neil, Augustana College (IL), Choice, November 2008

— M. Neil, Augustana College (IL)

American Reference Books Annual
"This work is highly recommended for all larger public and academic libraries, and smaller libraries with specialized music collections. ... conductors, musicologists, and others connected with symphonic music would certainly benefit from having these volumes in their libraries." —Robert L. Wick, American Reference Books Annual

— Robert L. Wick

Choice - M. Neil

"Written with wry good humor, this scholarly volume uncovers a rich world of previously under-appreciated masterpieces. Serious students of music—whether student, performer, conductor, or avid listener—will find this latest volume in this masterful series both informative and readable.... Essential." —M. Neil, Augustana College (IL), Choice, November 2008

American Reference Books Annual - Robert L. Wick

"This work is highly recommended for all larger public and academic libraries, and smaller libraries with specialized music collections. ... conductors, musicologists, and others connected with symphonic music would certainly benefit from having these volumes in their libraries." —Robert L. Wick, American Reference Books Annual

American Reference Book Annual 2008 Vol.39
This work is highly recommended for all larger public and academic libraries, and smaller libraries with specialized music collections. . . . conductors, musicologists, and others connected with symphonic music would certainly benefit from having these volumes in their libraries.
—Robert L. Wick
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253348012
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 1168
  • Sales rank: 1,138,187
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 2.30 (d)

Meet the Author

A. Peter Brown (1943–2003) joined the faculty of the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music in 1974 and was professor of musicology and department chair at the time of his death. The author of more than 80 published articles and reviews, Brown was especially known for his scholarship on Joseph Haydn.

Indiana University Press

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Table of Contents

List of Plates
List of Tables
Preface to the Series
Preface to Volume III
Postscript
Acknowledgments
List of Abbreviations
Orchestral Instrumentation
Identification of the Works

Volume III Part A: Germany and the Nordic Countries

Section One—The German Classic/Romantic Symphony from ca. 1800 to 1857
Chapter One—After Beethoven: Leipzig as the Epicenter of the Symphony
Chapter Two—The Symphonies of Carl Maria von Weber and Richard Wagner: Two Symphonic
Chapter Three—The Symphonies of Louis Spohr
Chapter Four—The Symphonies of Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy
Chapter Five—The Symphonies of Robert Schumann
Section Two—The Symphony in Northern Europe
Chapter Six—The Symphony in Nineteenth-Century Sweden
Chapter Seven—The Symphony in Norway
Chapter Eight—The Symphony in Denmark from ca. 1830 to ca. 1925
Chapter Nine—The Symphony in Finland from ca. 1850 to 1936
Section Three—The Avant-Garde/New School Symphonists
Chapter Ten—Hector Berlioz
Chapter Eleven—Franz Liszt
Chapter Twelve—Joachim Raff
Chapter Thirteen—Richard Strauss
Notes
Bibliography of Works Cited
Index
Index of Works

Volume III Part B: Great Britain, Russia, France
Section Four—The British Symphony
Chapter Fourteen—The Symphony in Great Britain: From Potter to Elgar
The Symphonic Milieu from ca. 1800 to ca. 1850
The Symphonic Milieu from ca. 1850 to 1912
Section Five—The Russian Symphony
Chapter Fifteen—The Symphony in Russia: From Glinka to Rachmaninoff
Section Six—The French Symphony
Chapter Sixteen—The French Symphony after Berlioz: From the Second Empire to the First World War
Introduction: The Symphony in Mid-Century
Between Saint-Saëns's Second and Third: The "Revival" of Instrumental Music after 1870French Symphonies after 1885: Classical and Romantic Camps
Between the Mountain Air and d'Indy's Second: The Symphony at the Turn of the Century

Notes
Bibliography of Works Cited
Index
Index of Works

Indiana University Press

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Introduction

A surprising aspect of the twentieth-century musical historiography is that some of the central repertoires of Western art music remain unexplored in broad-based treatments; the exceptions are Donald J. Grout's A Short History of Opera (1947), William S. Newman's History of the Sonata Idea (1959, 3 vols.), and, most recently, Howard Smither's History of the Oratorio (1977, 4 vols.). Except for Newman's efforts for the sonata, the large instrumental genres such as the string quartet and symphony, which form the core of the canon, have received the least attention. The reasons for this neglect have been practical: much of the music for large ensembles was disseminated in parts rather than scores during the eighteenth century, and many of the scores published during the nineteenth century have deteriorated to brittleness. Fortunately, within the 1980s and 1990s a sufficient number of the more obscure symphonies has been made available in editions and reprints so that a measured and reasonable overview can be constructed.
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