Syncopated by Brendan Burford | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Syncopated: An Anthology of Nonfiction Picto-Essays

Syncopated: An Anthology of Nonfiction Picto-Essays

by Brendan Burford
     
 

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The stories in Syncopated challenge convention, provide perspective, and search out secret truths–all in the inviting, accessible form of comics.

Syncopated
will give you a daringly different view of the past–from the history of vintage postcards to the glory days of old Coney Island. It will immerse you in fascinating subcultures,

Overview

The stories in Syncopated challenge convention, provide perspective, and search out secret truths–all in the inviting, accessible form of comics.

Syncopated
will give you a daringly different view of the past–from the history of vintage postcards to the glory days of old Coney Island. It will immerse you in fascinating subcultures, from the secret world of graffiti artists to the chess champs of Greenwich Village. And it will open your eyes to pieces of forgotten history–for example, the Tulsa race riots of 1921–and to new perspectives on critical current events, such as the interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay. These “picto-essays” encompass memoir, history, journalism, and biography in varied visual styles–each handpicked by Brendan Burford, one of America’s top editors.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The big-label relaunch of the once-self-published Syncopated anthologies ("a New Yorker for the comics set") is a uniformly classy affair with only a few slow moments. As the title suggests, the book collects meaty article presented as comics. Series editor and curator Burford contributes two pieces, one of which might be the book's high point: a study of the life of Boris Rose, who built probably the world's largest collection of live jazz recordings, still locked in storage and most of it never heard by anyone but Rose himself. Alex Holden provides an amazing bit of picto-journalism in "West Side Improvements," the story of Manhattan's riverside train tracks and the vibrant graffiti culture that grew in their tunnels. Nick Bertozzi's "How and Why to Bale Hay" is a somewhat traditional graphical memoir; Greg Cook's "What We So Quietly Saw" is anything but traditional, using only silhouettes to tell selected stories from inside Guantánamo Bay. Only Dave Kiersh's "Welcome Home, Brave" fails to fully satisfy, due to a flat narrative. An elegant and smart volume, well worth the space on the collector's shelf. (May)Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up—This outstanding, innovative collection, featuring an array of newer artists, offers engaging topics for serious graphic novel enthusiasts. From baling hay and life in the New York subway to a history of the postcard and the race-based 1921 Tulsa Massacre, readers will gain new insights into some forgotten moments. The graphic styles include pen silhouettes, pen-and-ink drawings, scratchboards, and other well-executed illustrations. History buffs will appreciate this accessible collection of varied art forms and areas of investigative interest depicted in the essays.—Gregory Lum, Jesuit High School, Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345505293
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/19/2009
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
16 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Brendan Burford is the comics editor at King Features Syndicate. He has also been self-publishing the Syncopated anthology series, and the autobiographical series Brendan Comics, since 2002.

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