Synkronized

Synkronized

4.5 2
by Jamiroquai
     
 

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Following the breakout success of 1997's TRAVELLING WITHOUT MOVING, Jamiroquai triumphantly return to the airwaves with SYNKRONIZED. With a new set of songs, this British dance-pop ensemble sticks to the formula that first started their climb up the charts: singer Jay Kay's elastic, Stevie Wonder-infused vocals; tricky horns;…  See more details below

Overview

Following the breakout success of 1997's TRAVELLING WITHOUT MOVING, Jamiroquai triumphantly return to the airwaves with SYNKRONIZED. With a new set of songs, this British dance-pop ensemble sticks to the formula that first started their climb up the charts: singer Jay Kay's elastic, Stevie Wonder-infused vocals; tricky horns; lavish string arrangements, and a soul-funk groove or disco bounce to push the action along. "Canned Heat," the first single, boasts classic disco violins and the sizzle of the ever-present high hat, while a bass line burbles underneath. Throughout, there's plenty of '70s revisionism, as in the funky fuzz bass on "Planet Home," the airy synths of "Destitute Illusion," and the reedy keyboards and SHAFT-inspired riffs of the standout "Black Capricorn Day." Add to that the sexy, groove-soaked ballads "Butterfly" and "Falling," and you get a sweet taste of what Jamiroquai's soul is all about.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - John Bush
Three years after their breakout Travelling Without Moving, Jamiroquai returned with another album that charts Jay Kay's continuing fascination with club-bound music of the 1970s -- from disco to jazz-funk to rare groove to later Motown -- but also shows signs of maturity. Produced by Kay with Al Stone, who also collaborated on Travelling Without Moving, the album includes several tracks (like the single "Canned Heat") that work infectious acid jazz grooves, and Kay's hipster vocals give out feel-good vibes through a set of ambiguously good-time lyrics. Though other tracks show a bit of an electronica update to the affairs, each still spotlights how strong and tight the band is. It may not be a leap ahead in sound, but Synkronized is another solid Jamiroquai record.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/08/1999
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0074646997321
catalogNumber:
69973

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jamiroquai   Primary Artist,Vocals
Solá Akingbolá   Percussion
Wallis Buchanan   Didjeridu
Katie Kissoon   Background Vocals
Beverley Skeete   Background Vocals
Toby Smith   Keyboards
DJ Zire   Turntables
Derrick McKenzie   Drums
Nick Fyffe   Bass
Simon Katz   Guitar

Technical Credits

Solá Akingbolá   Composer
Wallis Buchanan   Composer
Kick Horns   Horn Arrangements
Jason Kay   Composer
David Malone   Concept
Toby Smith   Composer,Programming
Stone   Producer,Engineer
Jamiroquai   Arranger,Composer
Simon Hale   Arranger,Composer,String Arrangements
Derrick McKenzie   Composer
Simon Katz   Composer

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Synkronized 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Synkronized is smooth and mellow, but hip at the same time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Acting as a bridge between the organic jazz funk of the early Jamiroquai and the electronica-driven disco of recent years, Synkronized is unjustly given a bad rap by fans looking for a reason to blame frontman Jay Kay's transformation from crusading jazz man to slicker-than-water pop star. A closer look finds the album to be one of the band's more varied works, as Jay and the crew (sans departing bassist Stuart Zender) jump from full-tilt disco (Canned Heat, Soul Education) to soulful balladry (Butterfly, Falling) to sonic atmospheres (Planet Home, Supersonic). Hints of the future electronica that would dominate their 2001 release, "A Funk Odyssey", show through on several tracks, but these tracks are balanced by undeniably live rhythm sections (Where Do We Go From Here is an example), solid beats from drummer Derrick McKenzie and percussionist Sola Akingbola, and of course, Mr. Kay's instantly recognizable voice that soars through the songs. Some songs take longer than others to grow on you (Black Capricorn Day and the instrumental Destitute Illusions), but once they do, the album becomes known as a solid slice of music period-even with the electronic touches. Fans believed that these were just some decorations for the sound back in 1999. Little did they know what was going to happen two years later...