Syria: A Question and Answer Book

Overview

Provides an introduction to Syria, using a question-and-answer format that discusses land features, government, housing, transportation, industries, education, sports, art forms, holidays, food, and family life. Includes a map, facts, and charts.
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Overview

Provides an introduction to Syria, using a question-and-answer format that discusses land features, government, housing, transportation, industries, education, sports, art forms, holidays, food, and family life. Includes a map, facts, and charts.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Elisabeth Greenberg
The text of this book fulfills the series mission to use short direct sentence structure with a carefully controlled vocabulary to help below-level readers gain information. Syria is a complicated country, so that a simple question such as "When did Syria become a country?" requires more than a simple date. The text clearly traces Syria's emergence from the Ottoman Empire when its alliance with the Germans in World War I led to its dissolution, France's control of Syria for more than twenty years, and Syria's bid for independence and nationhood. Similarly, the two pages about government lays out its structure—president and two prime ministers with council of elected representatives—and defines roles such as lawmaker, advisor, approver, and military leader. Unfortunately, the book does not deliver on the selection and captioning of images. While many of the photographs are clear and evocative, the one on silkscreen workshops mislabels the fabric as "used to make clothes" when in fact the artisans are silk-screening tablecloths, a noted traditional product of Aleppo snapped up by tourists and locals alike. Further, the "traditional foods" of Syria show a typical American pimento-stuffed olive rather than the full round black olives or the wrinkled lemony green olives locally produced and found on Syrian tables at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. A better choice would have been to show typical American olive side by side with Syrian olives and a caption noting the differences. In a series where text and image work together to deliver information, these mistakes, while minor, will lead growing minds in the wrong direction. Part of the "Fact Finders" series.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Mary Englar is a freelance writer and a teacher of English and creative writing. She has a master of fine arts degree in writing from Minnesota State University, and has written more than 30 nonfiction books for children. She continues to read and write about the many different cultures of our world in Minnesota.
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