Tabloid City [With Earbuds]

( 30 )

Overview

In a stately West Village town house, a wealthy socialite and her secretary are murdered. In the 24 hours that follow, a flurry of activity surrounds their shocking deaths:

The head of one of the city's last tabloids stops the presses. A cop investigates the killing. A reporter chases the story. A disgraced hedge fund manager flees the country. An Iraq War vet seeks revenge. And an angry young extremist plots a major catastrophe.

The City is ...

See more details below
This Audiobook (Other) is Not Available through BN.com
Tabloid City: A Novel

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.74
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

In a stately West Village town house, a wealthy socialite and her secretary are murdered. In the 24 hours that follow, a flurry of activity surrounds their shocking deaths:

The head of one of the city's last tabloids stops the presses. A cop investigates the killing. A reporter chases the story. A disgraced hedge fund manager flees the country. An Iraq War vet seeks revenge. And an angry young extremist plots a major catastrophe.

The City is many things: a proving ground, a decadent carnival, or a palimpsest of memories--a historic metropolis eclipsed by modern times. As much a thriller as it is a gripping portrait of the city of today, Tabloid City is a new fiction classic from the writer who has captured New York perfectly for decades.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

If a budding Hollywood director were searching for the archetypal New York City journalist, he or she could find no better model than Pete Hamill. A veteran beat writer and columnist, a former editor-in-chief of both The New York Post and The New York Daily News, Hamill knows what it means to chase down a front-page story or to confront a stop-the-presses editorial decision. In the case of his new Tabloid City, the headline grabber is the murder of a socialite and her personal secretary at a stylish Manhattan town house. This ambitious ensemble novel takes us into late night city newsroom deadlines and the nest of a terrorist plotting destruction.

Publishers Weekly
Hamill (North River) forays into Dominic Dunne society crime territory before veering uncomfortably into a far-fetched terrorist plot. Just as the last ever edition of the New York World is getting put to bed, veteran editor Sam Briscoe stops the presses for a sensational murder: socialite Cynthia Harding and her personal secretary are found stabbed to death in Harding's Manhattan town house. The story unfolds in time-stamped, you-are-there bursts that follow a large cast, including several journalists; Cynthia's adopted daughter; a disgraced Madoff-like financier; a media blogger; the murdered secretary's husband, a police officer assigned to a counterterrorism task force, as well as their son, a convert to radical Islam; and best of all by the weary and worldly Briscoe himself. Hamill is at his best in the Briscoe portions, rich in print anecdotes and mournful for a passing age, but as both the initial murders and the closing of the paper play into a larger plot and the young extremist becomes the driving force of the novel, the quality slides precipitously, and, as if sensing defeat, the book is brought to a too abrupt conclusion with most of the principals gathered for a group of scenes that strain credulity. Hamill nails the dying newsroom, but gets lost on the terrorism beat. (May)
Library Journal
Employing a symphony of voices—a venomous blogger trying to masquerade as impartial, an angry wheelchair-bound vet with a gun, a black cop whose errant son has become a jihadist, a hedge fund manager on the lam, an illegal alien who's just been laid off—Hamill (North River) moves across disparate narratives with protagonists ineluctably drawn together by the unfolding of events. At heart, his novel is a paean for an endangered world of journalism, done in by the economy and the attacks of the digital media. Although Hamill draws in and entertains the reader, he is done in by his own sentimentality. It's not so much the occasional overwriting as it is an attitude: Hamill should simply have written lean, clear prose all the way, instead of the kind of poetry he attempts in certain passages. Where he shows off style least, he writes best. VERDICT Even a mediocre novel by ex-journalist Hamill is an occasion for celebration. His many fans will enjoy this latest book. [See Prepub Alert, 11/15/10.]—David Keymer, Modesto, CA
The Barnes & Noble Review

Pete Hamill has written many love letters to New York City, in fiction, journalism, and memoir. With his latest novel, he's written a nostalgic love letter to the New York City daily tabloids. Tabloid City shifts perspective among more than a dozen characters, but at its heart is Sam Briscoe, a 71-year-old editor who wears fedoras and trench coats and says "goddamned" a lot. Sam helms the New York World, Gotham's last afternoon tabloid, which, like all newspapers, is "under assault from digitalized artillery."

Tabloids thrive on what Briscoe calls "murder at a good address," and it is a Greenwich Village double homicide, of a socialite and her secretary, that drives the fast-paced but occasionally implausible action here. Cynthia Harding, a wealthy patron of the New York Public Library, is found stabbed to death in her townhouse along with her employee Mary Lou Watson. Harding is Briscoe's longtime companion; Watson's husband is an NYPD counter-terrorism officer who worries that their estranged son, Malik, a radical Muslim, is connected to the crime. The novel's action spans one day, and its dizzying number of characters includes an elderly artist, a Bernie Madoff-esque swindler, a Mexican cleaning lady, a disabled Iraq veteran, a bitter gossip blogger, and a young reporter. Most of them are connected in some way, and circumstances throw most of them together at the scene of the novel's terrorism-related climax.

In addition to being a thriller, however, the novel is a sentimental elegy for the "profane, laughing city room" of yore, thick with cigarette smoke and the sound of clacking typewriters. As Briscoe deals with the death of his beloved Cynthia, he also faces an ominous early-morning meeting with the World's despised young publisher, who is rumored to be shutting down the print version of the paper. Hamill's long journalistic career includes stints at the New York Post and the New York Daily News, where he served as editor-in-chief. In Tabloid City, which is narrated in a clipped, journalistic voice, the author reveals the most affection for the noble and doomed newspaper employees. Briscoe and Helen Loomis, the two veterans of the World's newsroom, pine for the past, romanticizing even those elements we're presumably better off without. Briscoe makes a sneering reference to the fact that the members of the online staff probably don't smoke, while Loomis, forced to trudge outside for her hourly cigarette, longingly recalls the good old days with "the reporters cursing and laughing, making sexist remarks, and racist jokes."

But if much has changed, some things still remain: Hamill seems to suggest that hope lives in the talented rookie reporter Bobby Fonseca, who, after receiving his first press card from Briscoe, "wore it to bed for a month, like it was a dog tag." He's not a smoker, and he'll probably end up working for the paper's digital version, but he still has the soul of a newspaperman. Glancing at one of the subway system's ubiquitous "If you see something, say something" signs, he thinks, "Nah, if I see something, I write something. I'm a reporter, man."

--Barbara Spindel




Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611139426
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio
  • Publication date: 5/28/2011
  • Series: Playaway Adult Fiction Series
  • Format: Other
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 7.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Pete  Hamill
Pete Hamill is a novelist, journalist, editor, and screenwriter. He is the author of 16 previous books including the bestselling novels Forever and Snow in August and the bestselling memoir A Drinking Life. He lives in New York City.
Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York, and Cuernavaca, Mexico
    1. Date of Birth:
      1935
    2. Place of Birth:
      Brooklyn, New York
    1. Education:
      Mexico City College, 1956-1957; Pratt Institute
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A very New York novel!

    A violent crime draws together a cast of characters that find themselves interconnected in other ways. The crime, the intertwined social network, and these unusual characters give us an unsentimental picture of New York during the recession. We meet:

    * Lew Forrest of the Chelsea Hotel in Manhattan, an aging and successful painter who has lost his sight. His closest companion is Camus, a black labrador;
    * Cynthia Harding of Greenwich Village, a socialite particularly committed to the New York City libraries and literacy. Her longtime lover is Sam Briscoe of the New York World;
    * Sandra Gordon, whose precociousness at a dinner party in Jamaica drew the attention, sympathy, and mentorship of Cynthia Harding. From children's books to a passport and education, Cynthia helped Sandra find her place;
    * Sam Briscoe, the editor of New York World, the last afternoon newspaper in New York and a fixture in journalism circles;
    * Bobby Fonseca, a young journalist, who lives and breathes his work;
    * Ali Watson of Fort Greene, Brooklyn, a New York City homicide detective;
    * Malik Shahid, a young New Yorker turned religious fanatic/fundamentalist;
    * Josh Thompson, a veteran from the wars in the Middle East who has lost his home and his family and is on the streets of New York;
    * Beverly Starr, an artist from Gowanus, Brooklyn;
    * Consuelo Mendoza, an illegal immigrant from Mexico living in Sunset Park, Brooklyn; and
    * Myles Compton, a hedgefund manager whose bad investments and shady dealings lead him to abscond in the night.

    While each of the personalities are carefully constructed, I was particularly drawn to the women who are given central roles in the novel. Sandra Gordon is a secondary character but her strength, independence and vulnerability all come across so clearly. The interaction between the aging and nearly blind painter Lew Forrest and his long lost muse, Consuelo Mendoza is particularly touching. Even the socialite Cynthia Harding who only appears briefly is complex and fleshed out. Through a high profile murder and its aftermath, Tabloid City gives a fascinating and unsentimental glimpse of today's New York.

    ISBN-10: 0316020753 - Hardcover
    Publisher: Little, Brown and Company (May 5, 2011), 288 pages.
    Review copy provided by the publisher.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Crime within a crime story

    Pete Hamill knows the newspaper business and does one helluva job of helping readers grasp all that's going by the wayside in the transition to a world that may not care to read words in ink on paper.

    "Tabloid City" is a crime story, a violent story laced with the language of the New York gutter, one told in an interesting way, one character at a time. Most "chapters" could pass for 750-word newspaper columns.

    Frankly, the plot that builds so nicely loses a bit of steam and turns predictable. But I'm not sure the "crime" that Hamill has captured isn't less the cops-versus-bad guys story than the crime of the loss of newspapering the way it used to be.

    Hamill's newspaper characters ring true, and the loss of the skills -- really, that lifestyle -- that newspaper people have, that loss, that's the real crime.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The Past and the Future

    Tabloid City is a sad book with multliple storylines. On the day that Sam Briscoe, long-time editor of the World newspaper finds out that the print edition will be discontinued and the newspaper will only appear online, he also learns of the brutal murder of his girlfirend Cynthia Harding and her assistant in Cynthia's home. At the same time, young Malik is trying to find money so his 'ready-to-give-birth' girlfriend can go to a hospital. He has kept her locked in an abandoned building. Josh Thompson, a disabled Iraq war veteran stuck in a wheel chair, has a Mac-10 that he plans on using to get revenge.

    The fact that these diverse stories can come together into a believable, engrossing tale is no small feat. Pete Hamill does a fantastic job of both having old time newspaper people, Sam and Helen Loomis, reminisce about the journalism heydays gone by and exploring the future of news. He tells readers about the world as it really is, full of new technology and old terrorism, of the results of war and the efforts of the few to make life better for everyone.

    Tabloid City is filled with great characters (ones you both love and hate) and engrossing storylines. It is a sad book evoking little, but some, hope for the future. YOu will revel in the references to a 'better time' and feel heartbroken at some of the events that take place. Needless to say, you will not walk away from Tabloid City without it having called up some emotion. A highly recommended read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 8, 2014

    Tabloid City

    A great read from a great writer!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2012

    Cirrus

    She walked around the abandoned city and thought. Kicking a soda can around, she saw a small bakery that had bread in the window. Running, she opened the door and grabbed two loaves quickly. She sat in a corner and ate one. It was stale, but she didn't. She saved the other one and ran back to lowlands.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2012

    Loved It

    Loved how the story was from all the characters point of view and that it was written based on the time.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 23, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I read Tabloid City a second time to see why so many of the revi

    I read Tabloid City a second time to see why so many of the reviews are critical, suggesting that Hamill was just phoning it in. I beg to disagree. Each vignette is carefully constructed and well-written. I think the problem is that the individual tales don't always connect well, and, when seen as a whole make for a less than acceptable plot. So averaging all of the reviews gets us to three stars, just where I think it should be.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2012

    Nookville moving to nookville all results

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 19, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Tabloid City

    This story takes place within a twenty-four hour period in New York City. It revolves around the lives of a large group of people that do not seem to have any connection to one another. After the murder of two women, we follow segment of each of these people's lives (the author has conveniently giving us the person time and place above each slice of this pie).

    The central character is newspaper editor Sam Briscoe who is trying to keep a dying industry alive. Pete Hamill has crafted a story about New York City and the tortured people who live there. Although, I lived in the city for thirteen years, this novel didn't connect with me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)