Tactical Transparency: How Leaders Can Leverage Social Media to Maximize Value and Build Their Brand

Overview

tactical transparency

Organizations are under a microscope as never before, and thanksto the Internet and the growing use of high-speed connections, wordof misdeeds and mistakes can spread to millions with unprecedentedspeed, causing untold damage to an organization's reputation andshare price. No longer just a "nice-to-know" concept, transparencyhas become a state of mind for thousands of CEOs, managers,employees, and customers around the globe. The flood of socialmedia has ...

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Overview

tactical transparency

Organizations are under a microscope as never before, and thanksto the Internet and the growing use of high-speed connections, wordof misdeeds and mistakes can spread to millions with unprecedentedspeed, causing untold damage to an organization's reputation andshare price. No longer just a "nice-to-know" concept, transparencyhas become a state of mind for thousands of CEOs, managers,employees, and customers around the globe. The flood of socialmedia has brought in an age of digital transparency that is puttingthe power to create or destroy a reputation into the hands ofconsumers. Every business today must speak the language and meetthe expectations of a new digital population.

While exposing the risks inherent in maintaining anontransparent relationship with customers, Tactical Transparencyprovides a methodology that will help organizations create theirown unique plans to bring greater authenticity to their companiesand brands. Drawn largely from interviews with leaders in companiesthat have achieved measurable success in this arena, authors ShelHoltz and John C. Havens provide step-by-step details on howexecutives and professional communicators can create a transparencystrategy that will keep their organizations competitive in thetwenty-first century. The authors show how organizations canevaluate their readiness for transparency, what they need to do toget ready, and how'to effectively communicate their transparencystrategy to their customers and employees. They also identifyaspects of blog/new media "netiquette"—an important but oftenmisunderstood part of engaging in transparency.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Shel Holtz, an accredited business communicator, is aprincipal of Holtz Communication + Technology. His clients haveincluded Intel, Sears, PepsiCo, Aetna, John Deere, General Mills,USAA, Applied Materials, Symantec, Raytheon, World Bank, Petrobras,Disney, FedEx, Freescale Semiconductor, and more. He is the authorof five communication-related books.

John C. Havens is vice president of business developmentfor BlogTalkRadio.com. His About.com Guide to Podcastingshow has featured interviews with hundreds of new media's leadingminds. Previously, he was a professional actor, appearing in suchfilms and TV shows as The Thomas Crown Affair, Law &Order, and Spin City.

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Table of Contents

Foreword (Lynne D. Johnson).

Introduction: The Glass House of Business.

Part One: Strategy.

1. What Is Transparency? A Working Defi nition.

2. Someone May Be Looking: Transparency Done Right andWrong.

3. Do You Have What It Takes? Characteristics of TransparentOrganizations.

Part Two: Tactics.

4. From Prospects to People: Why Opaque Selling Doesn’tDeliver Long-Term Return on Investment.

5. Follow the Money: Financial Communications.

6. When Things Go Bad: Transparency During a Crisis.

7. Exposing the Company to the Employees Who Make It Work:Internal Transparency.

8. Meet the Press: Traditional Public Relations and MediaRelations.

9. The View from the Top: The Role of Leadership.

10. En-Gauge the Conversation: How Issues Blogs Show PeopleYou’re Listening.

11. From the Inside Looking Out: Employee Involvement.

12. Transparency Beyond Text: How Audio, Video, and InteractiveMedia Build Trust.

13. Profi le and Privacy: Transparency in Social Networks.

14. The Case for Face-to-Face: Transparency in Person.

Part Three: Making It Real.

15. The Toothpaste Is Out of the YouTube: Addressing Loss ofControl with Transparent Tactics.

16. Yeah, But . . . : Overcoming Objections.

17. Your Road Map to Transparency: Creating a Plan.

18. What’s Next? The Future of Transparency.

Notes.

Acknowledgments.

The Authors.

Index.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Insightful look at social media and transparency in business

    Shel Holtz and John C. Havens have tremendous experience with a range of social media, and both this experience and their zest for its possibilities come through clearly. This lively, timely book's core message is simple: In the digital age, transparency is a requirement, not a choice, and so business leaders must decide how to manage it. Your choices are complex, and fraught with emotion and risk. Transparency issues concerning openness and how much data to divulge often unfold in real time, so business readers need every bit of the guidance and preparation the authors provide. Holtz and Havens acknowledge that some of their specific suggestions will become dated quickly; however, their general principles and case studies will be useful for quite some time. (Actually, more pertinent than the fear that their pointers will become dated is the concern that the authors are overly enthusiastic about their topic.) getAbstract recommends this to readers interested in social media, and to leaders trying to shape a communication strategy in today's shifting landscape.

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