Tai Chi Dynamics: Principles of Natural Movement, Health & Self-Development by Robert Chuckrow, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Tai Chi Dynamics: Principles of Natural Movement, Health & Self-Development

Tai Chi Dynamics: Principles of Natural Movement, Health & Self-Development

3.5 2
by Robert Chuckrow
     
 

Winner – 2009 Eric Hoffer AwardFinalist – 2009 IP'S Highlighted Title AwardFinalist – 2008 Book of the Year Award by ForeWord MagazineFinalist – 2008 USA Best Book Award
Tai Chi Dynamics is intended for intermediate and advanced Taiji players. The author has been a Taiji practitioner for thirty-seven years and with a Ph.D. in experimental

Overview

Winner – 2009 Eric Hoffer AwardFinalist – 2009 IP'S Highlighted Title AwardFinalist – 2008 Book of the Year Award by ForeWord MagazineFinalist – 2008 USA Best Book Award
Tai Chi Dynamics is intended for intermediate and advanced Taiji players. The author has been a Taiji practitioner for thirty-seven years and with a Ph.D. in experimental physics. He applies logic and basic scientific principles of anatomy, physiology, and physics to muscular action, breathing, and alignment in Taiji movement and push-hands. He clarifies, in depth, many perplexing concepts such as “correct force” by utilizing detailed explanations, illustrations, and photographs.
Sayings from the Taiji Classics are quoted throughout, and exercises are provided to give readers a chance to confirm their understanding.
Over a dozen self-defense applications of the basic Taiji movements are illustrated, and the effectiveness and completeness of Taiji as a martial art today is candidly analyzed. Suggestions for many aspects of teaching Taiji are provided, which stem from over three decades of practical experience. A chapter on Zheng Manqing (Cheng Man-ch’ing),
with whom the author studied for five years in the early 1970s, sheds light on Zheng and his students.
One chapter deals extensively with aspects of self development from a personal perspective, discusses how doing Taiji correctly is a precursor to spiritual growth, and compares religion, science, and spiritual teachings. A detailed chapter on health, self-massage, and healing discusses fasting (including the author’s own experience with a twenty-eight-day fast), differences between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine, and provides exercises and methods of self-massage for head, legs, feet, and back. There is even a section on how to make your own footwear suitable for practicing Taiji. The book includes personal anecdotes and stories and has over one hundred photographs and illustrations drawn by the author.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594391163
Publisher:
Ymaa Publication Center
Publication date:
07/25/2008
Pages:
274
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.80(d)

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Meet the Author

Robert Chuckrow has been a Taiji practitioner since 1970 and has studied Taiji under the late Cheng Man-ch'ing, William C. C. Chen, and Harvey I. Sober. He has taught Taiji extensively and has written four other books. He currently teaches Taiji in Westchester, NY.

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Tai Chi Dynamics: Principles of Natural Movement, Health & Self-Development 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have studied Tai Chi with Robert Chuckrow since 1988. In addition, I have studied Kinetic Awareness with Elaine Summers.

As a teacher, Chuckrow encompasses what he has garnered from many teachers and through his study of other disciplines. His method of teaching is to emphasize and communicate an understanding of the underlying principles of Tai Chi. His knowledge of physics definitely helps to explain these principles. As a dedicated teacher, he wishes to make his knowledge and insights fully available to his students and, through "Tai Chi Dynamics," to share and extend it to other practitioners of Tai Chi.

Chuckrow has studied Kinetic Awareness extensively with Elaine Summers and holds a master certificate in that art. In this book, Chuckrow often explains Tai Chi principles by referring to muscular extension, which is one of the underlying concepts of Kinetic Awareness and has been used for decades in the fields of physical therapy, Yoga, Pilates, Feldenkrais, dance, bicycling, swimming, gymnastics, and weight-lifting. As a student of Kinetic Awareness, I am very familiar with this concept. I have incorporated it into my movements, which, as a result, have undergone much refinement. I feel more power in any action by using muscular extension. I find this not only in the practice of Tai Chi, but also in hiking, activities of daily living, and my work as an artist, particularly in wood sculpture.

In "Tai Chi Dynamics," Chuckrow shows how muscular extension is present in Tai Chi movement. He gives many examples and exercises and shows how muscular extension can explain some of the more elusive concepts of Tai Chi very simply. Moreover, he explains and shows how the subtle movements of Tai Chi use the passive movement of gravity and centrifugal force. He considers the importance of circular motion, yin and yang, and peng, how to feel the power when everything in the body is connected, and how both movement and intention operate in Tai Chi.

This book is a work of maturity--the consideration of ideas from a lifetime of thought and experience. I recommend it to practitioners of Tai Chi who wish to broaden and deepen their art. I know I will study and refer back to this book many times to develop my own understanding of Tai Chi principles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book handles the application of scientific principles of physics and physiology to Taiji movements and postures. Such a book is a welcome addition to the available collection of books about Taiji that in general do not explain the physiological and physical base of the art. Since the author has almost 40 years experience in Taiji and holds a Ph.D. in physics he seems very well equipped to deliver a clarifying book about the subject. The book however does not live up to this expectation. The author namely has based his book for a great deal on a newly invented concept called muscular extension, where muscle bundles exert force by extending instead of contracting. He connects li or external strength with the familiar muscular contraction and jin or internal strength with the new muscular extension. Any scientific support for this phenomenon is lacking and the mechanism that he proposes is in strong conflict with both established physical laws and physiological principles. The concept is used throughout the book and many explanations are based on it. Although the book contains several useful and clarifying sections it is interspersed with this faulty concept which makes it difficult to separate the useful from the questionable stuff. It can therefore only be recommended as reading-matter for the very critical reader.