BN.com Gift Guide

Taiwan's Imagined Geography: Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683-1895

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$17.43
(Save 30%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $18.33
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 26%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $18.33   
  • New (4) from $24.35   
  • Used (5) from $18.33   

Overview

Until 300 years ago, the Chinese considered Taiwan a "land beyond the seas," a "ball of mud" inhabited by "naked and tattooed savages." The incorporation of this island into the Qing empire in the seventeenth century and its evolution into a province by the late nineteenth century involved not only a reconsideration of imperial geography but also a reconceptualization of the Chinese domain. The annexation of Taiwan was only one incident in the much larger phenomenon of Qing expansionism into frontier areas that resulted in a doubling of the area controlled from Beijing and the creation of a multi-ethnic polity. The author argues that travelers' accounts and pictures of frontiers such as Taiwan led to a change in the imagined geography of the empire. In representing distant lands and ethnically diverse peoples of the frontiers to audiences in China proper, these works transformed places once considered non-Chinese into familiar parts of the empire and thereby helped to naturalize Qing expansionism.

By viewing Taiwan-China relations as a product of the history of Qing expansionism, the author contributes to our understanding of current political events in the region.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice

Thoroughly examining Qing dynastic travel accounts and maps of Taiwan, Teng has written a splendid analysis of changing Chinese perceptions of Taiwan and its indigenous peoples from the late 17th century on, culminating in Taiwan's becoming a province of China in 1887...This book should be read by anyone interested in early Taiwanese history or in better understanding the current views about Taiwan held by Chinese in both the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China. Those interested in discourses about the nature of imperialism or in how depictions of indigenous native peoples are manipulated to suit colonizers' needs will also find this book worthwhile.
— V. J. Symons

Far Eastern Economic Review

Refreshingly, Teng divorces the relationship of the island and the mainland from the now stale arguments over reunification, or whether or not Taiwan is part of China, and grounds it in the tantalizing history of Chinese imperialism. She draws on Qing dynasty (1644-1911) travel writing and paintings to argue that China effectively colonized the island...Teng makes adroit use of a growing body of literature stigmatizing China as a colonial conqueror—rather than a victim of European colonialism—and incorporates the importance of Taiwan into the debate on Chinese expansionism.
— Macabe Keliher

Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History

Teng paints an intriguing picture of the debates that emerged concerning the colonization of Taiwan and official Qing policy towards the island's indigenous peoples...Teng is making a significant contribution to the study of imperialism overall, and is suggesting that it is time to move beyond the confines by which colonialism is seen as the exclusive practice of Western men.
— Jeremy E. Taylor

Choice - V. J. Symons
Thoroughly examining Qing dynastic travel accounts and maps of Taiwan, Teng has written a splendid analysis of changing Chinese perceptions of Taiwan and its indigenous peoples from the late 17th century on, culminating in Taiwan's becoming a province of China in 1887...This book should be read by anyone interested in early Taiwanese history or in better understanding the current views about Taiwan held by Chinese in both the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China. Those interested in discourses about the nature of imperialism or in how depictions of indigenous native peoples are manipulated to suit colonizers' needs will also find this book worthwhile.
Far Eastern Economic Review - Macabe Keliher
Refreshingly, Teng divorces the relationship of the island and the mainland from the now stale arguments over reunification, or whether or not Taiwan is part of China, and grounds it in the tantalizing history of Chinese imperialism. She draws on Qing dynasty (1644-1911) travel writing and paintings to argue that China effectively colonized the island...Teng makes adroit use of a growing body of literature stigmatizing China as a colonial conqueror--rather than a victim of European colonialism--and incorporates the importance of Taiwan into the debate on Chinese expansionism.
Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History - Jeremy E. Taylor
Teng paints an intriguing picture of the debates that emerged concerning the colonization of Taiwan and official Qing policy towards the island's indigenous peoples...Teng is making a significant contribution to the study of imperialism overall, and is suggesting that it is time to move beyond the confines by which colonialism is seen as the exclusive practice of Western men.
Far Eastern Economic Review
Refreshingly, Teng divorces the relationship of the island and the mainland from the now stale arguments over reunification, or whether or not Taiwan is part of China, and grounds it in the tantalizing history of Chinese imperialism. She draws on Qing dynasty 1644-1911 travel writing and paintings to argue that China effectively colonized the island...Teng makes adroit use of a growing body of literature stigmatizing China as a colonial conqueror--rather than a victim of European colonialism--and incorporates the importance of Taiwan into the debate on Chinese expansionism.
— Macabe Keliher
Choice
Thoroughly examining Qing dynastic travel accounts and maps of Taiwan, Teng has written a splendid analysis of changing Chinese perceptions of Taiwan and its indigenous peoples from the late 17th century on, culminating in Taiwan's becoming a province of China in 1887...This book should be read by anyone interested in early Taiwanese history or in better understanding the current views about Taiwan held by Chinese in both the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China. Those interested in discourses about the nature of imperialism or in how depictions of indigenous native peoples are manipulated to suit colonizers' needs will also find this book worthwhile.
— V. J. Symons
Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History
Teng paints an intriguing picture of the debates that emerged concerning the colonization of Taiwan and official Qing policy towards the island's indigenous peoples...Teng is making a significant contribution to the study of imperialism overall, and is suggesting that it is time to move beyond the confines by which colonialism is seen as the exclusive practice of Western men.
— Jeremy E. Taylor
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674021198
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Series: Harvard East Asian Monographs Series , #230
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Emma J. Teng is Professor of Chinese Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 An island beyond the seas enters the map 34
2 Taiwan as a living museum : savagery and tropes of anachronism 60
3 A hidden jade in a ball of mud : landscape and colonial rhetoric 81
4 Debating difference : racial and ethnical discourses 101
5 The raw and the cooked : classifying Taiwan's land and natives 122
6 Picturing savagery : visual representations of racial difference 149
7 An island of women : the discourse of gender 173
8 Fashioning Chinese origins : nineteenth-century ethnohistoriography 194
9 "Opening the mountains and pacifying the savages" 209
Conclusion : Taiwan as a lost part of "my China" 237
Epilogue : on the impossibility of a postcolonial theory of Taiwan 249
App. A Excerpts from Yu Yonghe's Small sea travelogue 261
App. B Excerpts from Ding Shaoyi's Brief record of the eastern ocean 281
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)