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Take a City Nature Walk
     

Take a City Nature Walk

5.0 1
by Jane Kirkland
 

Promoting observation, discovery, and wonder, this take-along nature guide explores an overlooked yet fascinating environment: the city. Arguing that there is no better—or more convenient—place to find prime examples of plant and animal adaptations, see the impact of humans on the environment, and understand the importance of sustainable lifestyles,

Overview


Promoting observation, discovery, and wonder, this take-along nature guide explores an overlooked yet fascinating environment: the city. Arguing that there is no better—or more convenient—place to find prime examples of plant and animal adaptations, see the impact of humans on the environment, and understand the importance of sustainable lifestyles, this book provides activities, artwork, and stories, that explore the world of nature in human-built surroundings. Sidebars supply definitions and pronunciations of new words and concepts, important plants of the urban landscape are detailed, and the most famous hawk in North America even makes an appearance. City dwellers will be astounded by the wealth of nature in their neighborhoods as they explore the plants and animals right under their noses.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This truly is an excellent book for children from 8 to 88 years old!"  —
Science Scope

Science Scope
This truly is an excellent book for children from 8 to 88 years old!
Children's Literature - Kristin Harris
There are hundreds of species of plants and animals that live in cities. Every city is an ecosystem, which means that the plants, animals, landscape, and climate all affect each other. It is important not to introduce non-native plants to an ecosystem because the results can be devastating. One advantage of living in the city is that the streets and buildings act as heat collectors. Consequently cities are warmer and some species thrive because they can breed or bloom earlier. Pigeons live in almost every city in the world. Many consider them pests. Pigeons' natural habitat is cliffs and high rocks. It was an easy transition for them to adapt to the buildings of a city. One species of birds was actually brought to cities to live to help it survive. Peregrine falcons were endangered because of exposure to pesticides. Scientists bred them and released the babies in cities. The cities had plenty of food and little pesticide use. The falcon population is now on the rise. Trees make a valuable contribution to a city's ecosystem. They absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. They keep soil from eroding, block noise, and create shade. Enjoy a city nature walk.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780970975430
Publisher:
Stillwater Publishing
Publication date:
06/30/2006
Series:
Take a Walk Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.23(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Jane Kirkland is a naturalist and photographer whose work has been featured on National Public Radio, Animal Planet TV, and in such magazines as Family Circle, Green Teacher, Parenting, and Parents. She is the author of Take a Backyard Bird Walk, Take a Tree Walk, and Take a Walk with Butterflies and Dragonflies. She lives in Downingtown, Pennsylvania.

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Take a City Nature Walk 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago