Take Back Your Time: Fighting Overwork and Time Poverty in America

Overview

The typical American worker puts in nine weeks more on the job than his or her European counterpart. The costs of this overwork are enormous, both personally and societally. This bracing collection of essays is both a wide - ranging analysis of the phenomenon and a blueprint for change. With contributions by such notable names as Vicki Robin, author of Your Money or Your Life, and David Korten, author of When Corporations Rule the World, this book shows what ordinary citizens can do to restore balance to ...
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Overview

The typical American worker puts in nine weeks more on the job than his or her European counterpart. The costs of this overwork are enormous, both personally and societally. This bracing collection of essays is both a wide - ranging analysis of the phenomenon and a blueprint for change. With contributions by such notable names as Vicki Robin, author of Your Money or Your Life, and David Korten, author of When Corporations Rule the World, this book shows what ordinary citizens can do to restore balance to themselves and their communities. Take Back Your Time is the official handbook for Take Back Your Time Day, a national event rallying support for reclaiming a proper work - life balance.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Touted as the official handbook of Take Back Your Time Day (a national event to be held on October 24, 2003), this compilation of expert views on America's battles against "time poverty" pulls out all the stops with its 30 powerful essays. De Graaf, author of Affluenza and TBYT Day's national coordinator, introduces each piece with background on its author and anecdotes drawn from his career as a teacher, documentary television producer and leader in public policy groups. The contributors, who range from economists and policymakers to activists and clergy, describe the problems of the 24/7 lifestyle: rising health care costs, diminishing family time, etc. In "The Simple Solution," Cecile Andrews admonishes readers to give up "obsessive multitasking." ("Think of the things you've seen people do while they're driving-putting on makeup, changing clothes, eating cereal, nursing a baby, reading the newspaper, and of course, jabbering on cell phones.") In "Can America Learn from Shabbat?", Rabbi Arthur Waskow argues that "there are deep human needs for rest and reflection, for family time and community time" and laments that "economic and cultural pressures are grinding those deep human needs under foot." Other authors suggest that the lethal consequences of overwork result in road rage, repetitive stress injuries, health problems, fast food mania, an increase in the working retired, inadequate child supervision, and even a proliferation of dog-walkers. De Graf also includes essays that help readers find ways to take time to be a citizen, retrieve shrinking vacation periods, cease the time-consuming pursuit of "stuff" and engage in job sharing, sabbaticals and other strategies. Illuminating and even surprising (e.g., the average American labors 350 more hours per year than his western European counterpart), this book should sell particularly well in areas were the "simplicity" movement is popular. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781459626539
  • Publisher: ReadHowYouWant, LLC
  • Publication date: 8/19/2011
  • Pages: 568
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.15 (d)

Meet the Author

de Graaf is a documentary television producer. He lives in Seattle.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction 1
Pt. 1 Overwork in America 5
1 The (Even More) Overworked American 6
2 An Issue for Everybody 12
3 The Incredible Shrinking Vacation 20
4 Forced Overtime in the Land of the Free 28
Pt. 2 Time is a Family Value 37
5 Overscheduled Kids, Underconnected Families 38
6 Recapturing Childhood 46
7 What about Fluffy and Fido? 52
Pt. 3 The Cost to Civil Society 57
8 Wasted Work, Wasted Time 58
9 Time to be a Citizen 66
10 Time and Crime 72
Pt. 4 Health Hazards 77
11 An Hour a Day (Could Keep the Doctor Away) 78
12 The (Bigger) Picture of Health 84
Pt. 5 Environmental Consequences 91
13 Haste Makes Waste 92
14 The Speed Trap 100
15 On Time, Happiness, and Ecological Footprints 107
Pt. 6 Historical and Cultural Perspectives 113
16 When We Had the Time 114
17 Can America Learn from Shabbat? 123
Pt. 7 Taking Back Your Time 133
18 Enough - the Time Cost of Stuff 134
19 The Simple Solution 139
Pt. 8 Workplace Solutions 145
20 Jobs to Share 146
21 A New Bottom Line 154
22 Working Retired 160
23 A Case for Sabbaticals 167
24 America Needs a Break 172
25 It Would be Good for Business Too 178
Pt. 9 Rethinking Patterns of Culture 185
26 Recipes for Relief 186
27 Time by Design 193
Pt. 10 Changing Public Policy 201
28 Europe's Work-Time Alternatives 202
29 A Policy Agenda for Taking Back Time 211
30 What's an Economy For? 219
Appendices 227
App. A Organizing Take Back Your Time Day in Your Community 228
App. B Teach-Ins and Study Circles 237
App. C How to Pitch (not Place) a Story 243
References 249
Index 255
About the Authors 265
Art Credits 269
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