Take Me Out to the Bat and Ball Factory

Take Me Out to the Bat and Ball Factory

by Peggy Thomson, Gloria Kamen
     
 
Grab some peanuts and Cracker Jack and come along on a tour of Hank's Bats and Balls Factory. Hank shows how wooden bats, aluminum bats, and balls are made by skilled workers, using interesting machinery and their own skills.

Overview

Grab some peanuts and Cracker Jack and come along on a tour of Hank's Bats and Balls Factory. Hank shows how wooden bats, aluminum bats, and balls are made by skilled workers, using interesting machinery and their own skills.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Get ready for the opening of baseball season on April 10 with this nonfiction offering. It explains to kids how wood and aluminum bats are made and also the baseballs that they are supposed to whack. Like the Magic School bus books, the kids take a trip to Hank's bat and ball factory and learn plenty. Thomson weaves in lots of trivia and a succinct history of the sport while Kamen informs and amuses with her watercolor illustrations. A good catch!
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
A group of kids tour a factory and learn how billets are turned into bats and how cores and covers become baseballs. This informative peek behind the sports scene comes complete with colorful illustrations, a brief history of baseball and engaging anecdotes about various players and their records.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4--A catchy title and attractive cover will grab the attention of readers; however, once this book is opened, confusion begins. Hank takes a group of children on a tour through a baseball and bat factory. Although there is ample information about how this equipment is made, the format is cluttered and the writing is sometimes awkward. The main text, written as dialogue, is outlined in blue. Sidebars enclosed in geometric shapes provide additional details, ranging from background information about the equipment to unimportant trivia. The children in the cartoon illustrations use dialogue bubbles to make comments that are sometimes relevant to the topic, and other times just silly or distracting. Double-page spreads about "Bats & Batting" and "Balls & Pitching" provide a smattering of baseball facts and interrupt the narrative flow. Jan Arnow's Louisville Slugger (Pantheon, 1984; o.p.) and William Jaspersohn's Bat, Ball, Glove (Little, Brown, 1989; o.p.) are better books on the topic.--Barb Lawler, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA
Kirkus Reviews
In a format that echoes that of the Magic Schoolbus titles, Thomson (City Kids in China, 1991, etc.) takes readers behind the scenes at the manufacturer of baseball bats and balls. In the context of a factory tour given to a group of children and a dog, all of whom comment as they go along, author and illustrator limn the materials and the steps involved in making wooden bats, aluminum bats, and hardballs. They also include bits of baseball trivia and lore, a smattering of history (not only when the game became open to African-Americans, but also when the little leagues became open to girls), and some terminology. For young sports enthusiasts, this is an engrossing glimpse at a side of the game to which they may not have given much thought. The pictures, though a bit wooden, are perfectly serviceable and clear, rounding out this pleasant survey of an interesting subject. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807577370
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
04/01/1998
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.31(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
7 - 11 Years

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