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Take Two [NOOK Book]

Overview

Payton and Emma left a trail of chaos in their wake when they “traded faces” just for fun. This time they’ll switch places to help each other and their friends out of a ginormous mess! Payton is helping out on the middle school musical while Emma puts her brains to use by tutoring—more like “twotoring”—identical twin boys. But when the boys turn out to be double trouble, Payton and Emma’s worlds collide and lead to more middle-school mix-ups and mayhem. In the end, Payton and Emma realize that no matter what, ...
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Take Two

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Overview

Payton and Emma left a trail of chaos in their wake when they “traded faces” just for fun. This time they’ll switch places to help each other and their friends out of a ginormous mess! Payton is helping out on the middle school musical while Emma puts her brains to use by tutoring—more like “twotoring”—identical twin boys. But when the boys turn out to be double trouble, Payton and Emma’s worlds collide and lead to more middle-school mix-ups and mayhem. In the end, Payton and Emma realize that no matter what, they have each other’s backs (as well as faces).
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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Busted in school for switching identities in Trading Faces (2009), identical twins Payton (fashion conscious) and Emma (studious), must now pay the price in this stand-alone sequel. The seventh graders think they're getting off easy when their guidance counselor asks them to mentor her own eight-year-old identical twin boys, but the girls who fooled an entire school have met their match. It's one lighthearted romp after another as Payton verbally spars with the school's drama queen and self-proclaimed AcadEmma thinks she must ditch her friends to win her mathletes competition, all while curbing the antics of Jason and Mason-or is that Mason and Jason? But perhaps life is not entirely ruined when likable boys show an interest in the two girls. "Twinspired" authors DeVillers and Roy are also identical twins. They incorporate the questions twins often hear (e.g., "Do you like being a twin?"), play on the public's stereotypes of twins with Payton and Emma pretending to speak their own language and humorously depict the girls' tight-knit relationship. Chick lit for the tween set. (Fiction. 10-13)
From the Publisher
"This is a well-paced story, with chapters alternating between the girls... kids will enjoy it."

SLJ, April 2010

"The second book in this series, following TRADING FACES, is really cute. I love the emphasis on personal happiness as the twins struggle to find their own identities at a new school. Just a great, fun tween read."

-TeenReadsToo.com

Children's Literature - Patricia Williamson
The story of two identical twins told from Payton and Emma's points of view—the heart at the beginning of the chapter helps to discern who is sharing—Payton and Emma are identical twins who like to take advantage of the fact that no one can tell them apart. Thus starts the madness of the book. Their story gets so intertwined, I often found myself going back to reread to figure out who was who. One day they decide to switch places, and when found out a forward thinking counselor decides to help them realize their mistake. Emma is assigned to tutor in Math and Payton is assigned to babysit identical twin boys while the drama production is in practice. But they switch...Payton loves drama and is very disappointed to be below the stage and with two boys who she can't tell apart. Sounds familiar! In the midst of it all, Payton finds the perfect person for her sister, Emma—Ox, who is being tutored in Math—but he thinks Payton is Emma. In all of it, they discover that being themselves is good enough and that the qualities that make them different are some of the best qualities to be working on. Reviewer: Patricia Williamson
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—Identical twins Emma and Payton Mills are back in another fun and realistic adventure involving switches, double identities, a school production of the Wizard of Oz, and a team of middle school math geniuses. After being caught switching places in Trading Faces (S & S, 2008), the sisters have agreed to school service work in lieu of detention. Payton, the fashionable one, is assigned clean-up duty for the drama club, while brainy Emma is asked to tutor Counselor Case's eight-year-old twins. Add Emma's crush on cute boy Ox, snide remarks from popular cheerleader Sydney, and a roaming gecko, and chaos ensues as Emma and Payton try to fulfill their service commitments. This is a well-paced story, with chapters alternating between the girls. While the students are colorful and interesting, the adults are a bit flat and sometimes stereotypical; Ms. Nicely, the school media specialist, is on hand to quiet noisy middle schoolers. References to texting and Wii games may quickly date this book, but kids will enjoy it.—Charlotte M. Johnston, Dorchester County Library, Summerville, SC
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416998716
  • Publisher: Aladdin
  • Publication date: 8/2/2011
  • Series: mix
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 82,868
  • Age range: 9 - 13 Years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Julia DeVillers is the author of How My Private, Personal Journal Became a Bestseller, which was adapted as a Disney Channel Original Movie. She is also the author of the Liberty Porter, First Daughter series and the coauthor of the Trading Faces series, written with her twin sister, Jennifer Roy.
Jennifer Roy is the author of the highly acclaimed Yellow Star, which won a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Award for Excellence in Children’s Literature and a Sydney Taylor Honor Award. It was a Jewish Book Awards Finalist, an ALA Notable Book, School Library Journal Best Book, and a NYPL Top Book for Reading and Sharing Books for the Teenager. She is also the author of Cordially Uninvited and Mindblind and the coauthor of the Trading Faces series, written with her twin sister, Julia DeVillers. Visit her at JenniferRoy.com.
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Read an Excerpt


Payton
One

MIDDLE SCHOOL AFTER LAST PERIOD

Cell phone! Oh, no, my cell phone was ringing!

I opened my tote bag and scrounged around in a panic. I felt my brush and mirror. My raspberry lip gloss. Ouch, sharp pencil.

And phew, my cell phone. I changed the ringer to vibrate. And not a moment too soon because the principal was walking toward us . . . toward us . . . and, whew. She walked right by us.

My phone went bzzzzt.

“Good job, Payton,” my twin sister, Emma, muttered. “Aren’t we in enough trouble without you breaking the no-cell-phones-on-during-school rule, too?”

Why yes. Yes, we were in enough trouble. Considering we were on our way to after-school detention.

“Plus, we are only allowed to use our cell phones for emergencies. We’re already grounded. We don’t need to get in any more trouble.” Emma went on and on and on . . .

I sighed as I walked down the hall. We passed a WELCOME, GECKOS! poster that was peeling off the wall. Someone had drawn a mustache and earrings on the gecko, the school mascot.

Only a little more than a week ago, I’d been so psyched to be at this new school. My own locker! New people! Cute guys! Different teachers! Switching classes!

But then, we had switched more than classes. We had switched places. And the whole identical twins trading places thing? Hadn’t worked out so well for us.

We passed two boys walking the other way. One turned around and laughed.

“Hey, look!” he said. “It’s those TV twins!”

They both laughed.

My face flamed red with embarrassment. The whole weekend I’d tried to prepare myself for that kind of comment. It had been a seriously long day.

“I wonder if they know who is who today,” his friend called out loudly, obviously so we could hear him.

“Who is whom,” Emma muttered as she walked next to me, lugging her ginormous backpack.

I rolled my eyes at her.

“What?” Emma said. “If they’re going to be insulting, they could at least be grammatically correct.”

And then she turned around to call to the boys.

“It’s whom! W-H-O-M!”

“Oh my gosh,” I said, grabbing her backpack strap and dragging her around the corner. “Shush!”

“But he was being inaccurate,” she protested. “And he was trying to make us look silly, but I showed him, didn’t I? Ha! Did you see the look of embarrassment on his face after I pointed out his error?”

Augh! He wasn’t embarrassed about his grammar, he was embarrassed for my sister. Emma was so entirely clueless sometimes.

“Just let it go,” I moaned. “Isn’t it bad enough that we’re known as the identical twins who switched places, fooled everyone until they were busted, and were filmed making complete idiots of themselves in front of the entire school last week?”

“‘Who’ is a subjective pronoun,” Emma muttered. “Duh.”

Sigh.

Even though last week was only our first week in our new school, we were already kind of famous. But not in a good way. Being called the “TV twins” sounded cool, until you knew the whole story. We hadn’t been on real TV, just the school video-cast shown live on a humongous screen at our first pep rally. When, unknown to us at the time, we were on camera arguing about Emma being a boring brainiac. And about me not doing so great at hanging out with popular people. Basically, in front of our entire school, we had a fight and called each other superficial, shallow, selfish, dumb and . . . Let’s just say we totally embarrassed ourselves.

“I wish we could start middle school over again,” I said. “We need a do-over.”

“Tell me about it,” Emma agreed. “I’m going to detention. Me! Emma ‘The Brain’ Mills! I’ve only stayed after for mathletes, a spelling bee, or to help the sixth-grade math teacher understand our honors homework. But detention?”

“It was your idea to switch places,” I reminded her.

“Because you needed me to help save your reputation after you embarrassed yourself in front of your so-called friends,” Emma shot back. “And look where that got us. Right into the principal’s office and detention and being grounded.”

Ugh. My sister was right. It seemed like a good idea at the time, switching places. Emma and I looked so much alike, we’d thought we could get away with it—and that it would be a minor break from our normal lives, which hadn’t been going so great.

“Detention! I think I’m going to hyperventilate. No, worse, I’m going to pass out,” Emma was muttering while unzipping her hoodie.

“Emma! Your sweatshirt!” I whispered, trying not to attract any more attention from people passing by.

“What? All this stress is making me hot,” Emma said, starting to pull off her sweatshirt.

“Emma, look at what you’re wearing,” I said, tilting my head toward her T-shirt so she’d get the picture. It said BEE THE BEST SPELLER IN SIXTH GRADE! It was bright yellow and had a freakish-looking bee wearing a crown on its head. She’d worn that thing all last year and it still made my eyes bleed.

With Emma’s newfound sort-of sense of style, I knew even she would be embarrassed by it. I smiled at the thought of Emma having even a small sense of style. Up until last week, Emma’s idea of style was to throw on sweats, tie her hair up in a ponytail, and wear a T-shirt from one of her gajillion competitions, advertising her brilliance. Even for the first day of school!

But I’d wanted to start the school year looking trendy and cool. So I’d spent the summer in camp doing chores for this girl, Ashlynn, who would pay me in her designer clothes. I called them my “Summer Slave clothes.”

The designer clothes had impressed this popular girl Sydney and given me temporary access to popularity. But very temporary, because then I’d totally embarrassed myself. Emma had stepped in to save me and we’d switched places. She helped me redeem myself with Sydney and her friends.

It worked for a couple days and then? Twin Fail.

But one good thing? Emma had discovered that looking comfortable and cute wasn’t such a bad thing. I waited as she opened her mouth to thank me for saving her from being seen in that T-shirt in public.

“Please tell me you’re not concerned with what I’m wearing right now or how I look?” Emma hissed at me.

Well, I was. Kind of. Her hair was really disastrous, since taking off the sweatshirt had caused a static attack. I reached into my tote bag and scrounged around. Mirror, lip gloss, ouch! Sharp pencil. Yeesh. And then there it was, my brush.

“That is the least of our problems right now,” Emma said. “I can’t believe you are even thinking about my appearance!”

I quickly dropped the brush back into the tote bag.

“Besides, this is the perfect shirt to wear,” Emma muttered. “It will remind Mrs. Case that I am the Spelling Bee Champion and not someone who gets in Big Trouble.”

Well, at least it would be harder to mix us up, with Emma’s static-head and goofy T-shirt. My hair was still looking good even after a bad day. My brownish blond, shiny hair was my best feature. Emma also had brownish blond hair, but it was a teeny bit less shiny than mine.

And I was pleased with my outfit today. I’d spent a lot of time choosing it. Since it was our first day back after our horrible humiliation, I wanted to make sure that when people pointed and stared at me at least I looked cute.

I was wearing:

  • A blue long-sleeved shirt
    (Summer Slave clothes)

  • A lighter blue tank
    (From when Emma had gone on a shopping spree for me)

  • Jeans
    (Summer Slave)

  • Bracelet with the P on it
    (Mine)

  • Sneakers
    (Mine. I was done wearing Ashlynn’s too-big shoes with their too-high heels.)

I noticed my sneaker was untied. Oh, shoot. That’s all I would need, to embarrass myself by tripping over my shoelace. I bent down to tie it, and didn’t notice someone rounding the corner until a white sneaker practically kicked me in the head.

“Hey!” I yelped. And looked up into the face of Sydney.

“Oh, it’s just the twins,” Sydney said dismissively, looking down at me and then at Emma.

Ugh. It’s The Sydney. She was wearing a green-and-yellow Geckos cheerleading uniform and holding pom-poms that were at my eye level. She obviously noticed that, too, and shook them so they swatted me in the face. I stood up quickly and stepped back.

“I can’t believe you twins!” Following Sydney, as always, was her friend Cashmere. “You guys could have injured Sydney, and that would be a disaster. Sydney is going to cheerleading practice.”

Sydney was cheerleading? Since when?

“Didn’t you hear?” Cashmere asked after seeing the look on my face. “Sydney’s on cheer squad! Daphne Yee broke her ankle, and Serra Potter moved to California. Sydney was the second alternate! Everyone knows she should have made it in the first place.”

“Oh, Cashmere.” Sydney giggled and faked a modest smile. “Let’s go. Can’t be late for cheerleading practice!”

Sydney did a Rah! move with her arms. I could hear Cashmere’s voice as they sauntered down the hall. “Did you see Twin #2’s outfit? It was sooo cute. I so want those jeans.”

“Shut it, Cashmere,” Sydney growled, and they walked on down the hall.

“Ugh, I don’t appreciate being called Twin #2. Cashmere and Sydney obviously know my name is Payton,” I grumbled. Sydney and Cashmere had ignored me completely all day. Well, except for giggling and whispering about me.

“Of course they do, because they were your FBFs,” Emma said cheerfully.

“BFFs,” I said, glaring at her. “How come you can win spelling bees but you can’t remember three letters in a row? And speaking of, can you please cover up that hideous shirt?”

Not that I cared what Sydney thought about Emma’s style anymore. Of course I didn’t. Not even a little bit.

“This shirt is more rare than one of your designer fashions,” Emma said pointedly. “Not everyone can win a spelling bee.”

And then she stopped walking. And pointed to a door that said DETENTION.

Emma started to hyperventilate. Loudly.

“I can’t! I can’t go in a detention room!” Emma gasped. “Won’t somebody stop this madness!?”

She was totally having a panic attack!

“Emma!” I pushed her toward the door. “Chill out! Do your breathing thing!”

Emma always did some breathing relaxation thing before her big competitions. It helped calm her down. I’d see her pacing the halls before the spelling bee or whatever we’re-smarter-than-you genius contest she was in.

“Relaxing, cleansing breaths,” she muttered. “In through the nose. Out through the mouth. Slow, deep breaths.”

She closed her eyes and started breathing slowly and deeply. And loudly.

“Nose in, mouth out,” I coached her.

“There are those twins,” a girl’s voice said. “Oh my gosh, are they talking to each other in a secret twin language?”

I looked in the detention room to see two girls staring at Emma and me in fascination.

“Yeah, I heard twins talk to each other in their own language, but I’ve never seen it before,” another girl’s voice said. “Spooky.”

“We’re breathing, okay?” I snapped. “Even twins breathe! Yeesh!”

The girls looked startled.

“We have to go in there,” I said to Emma gently. “Just take a little baby step and—”

Emma whimpered.

“Excuse me!” A boy was walking quickly down the hall toward us. “Are you Payton and Emma Mills?”

“Yes.” I sighed. “Yes, we’re the identical embarrassing twins from TV. Yes, we switched places and it didn’t go well. Yes, my hair is lighter and Emma’s a little taller.”

“Uh . . .” The boy looked slightly confused. “I just have a message to give you from the guidance counselor.”

Oh. I took the note and read it aloud. “‘You are excused from detention today. Please go to the guidance office.’ Signed, Counselor Case.”

“Follow me,” the boy said.

Emma’s eyes lit up as she backed away from the detention room.

“Excuse me, you know what this is about?” I asked the boy.

“I don’t know.” He shrugged. “All I know is that Counselor Case was complaining about troublemaker twins and they are going to be in So. Much. Trouble.”

Emma and I looked at each other and gulped. We walked in silence down the hall, not looking at each other the entire way, and into the guidance office.

A dark-haired woman was sitting behind a desk. When she saw us, she stood up and gestured for us to take a seat.

“I’m Counselor Case,” she said. “Please sit down.”

Emma and I sat down. We gave each other a worried look.

“I’m afraid this is a sticky situation,” the counselor said. “Twin issues are challenging. It must be hard to be identical twins and feel constantly compared to each other. You must feel like you have to stand out to have your own identity. And sometimes, that can lead to trouble. Big trouble.”

And then she got up suddenly and left the room.

© 2010 Julia Devillers And Jennifer Roy

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 163 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(124)

4 Star

(24)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 164 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    GOOD BOOK!!!

    I read this two times and LOVE it every time! It's funny, cute, and great! I would recommend!!!

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2012

    Really good

    It's really good and interesting. I seriously can't wait to get he next 2 books in the series (I read the first one "Trading Faces" and it was very good too) Read this book!

    13 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2011

    Best book ever!

    2 good 4 words!!!!

    10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2011

    I Love This Book

    This is the best book of the mix book series

    9 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 29, 2010

    Great Book!

    I loved reading another book about Emma and Payton. It wasn't as good as the first one, but I still enjoyed it.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2011

    so awsome

    i love this book kids should read it!

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Best Teen-Tween Series Yet!!!!

    I own a bookstore in New York, and wih my fasination reading books of this sorts growing up, I fell in love this series. Note that I am a 36 year old mother of twin teenage daughters Kimberly & Stella, (age 12) who are the exact opposites of Emma and Peyton. Kimberly loves makeup and all things teenager, but is also (no offence Kimberly) is also the smarter of the two. Kimberly is outgoing and energetic and is the (no offence Stela) te prettier of my daugters. I also have twin boys named Cameron and Jasin. They are only 9, but like my twin girls, and the "t.v. twins", they are becoming more and more diffrent by the day. I you havent read this seris yet, i strongly encourae you to do so.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 22, 2011

    Great!

    I loved this book along with all the other books in this series.You should get this book.It is totally worth the money.I have read this book about a million times since I've gotten it and it is great!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2011

    AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I read the first one and i loved it. And now im reading the second one and i still love it. The authors are good at writing books that they should make another book like this one

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Wow

    These books are so good but this one is kind of loosing he talent but the next on defently picks it right back up. You really have to read the first one to see whats really happening. This book does have boing parts but its defently worth reading so you can continue with the sieres. I really enjoyed this book though and hope you do too.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2011

    The Car Car Review

    A great book recommended to girls nine and up and ALL TWINS! What will the Mill twins do next? I LOVED THIS BOOK SO MUCH! I COULD NOT PUT THIS BOOK DOWN!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 14, 2011

    by:athena

    this book is amazinggggg!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2011

    So good

    Hey i L O V E D this book

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Awesome

    The frist book was so so good I cant wait until this book comes out I know I am going to love it!!!!!!!!!!!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great!

    I just read the back of the book, and it sounds so good! I cannot wait until it's available!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2012

    Anonymous

    AWSOME BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I WOULD GIVE IT 1000 STARS IF I COULD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Good but...not very realistic

    I thought the book was ok but it felt really corny. First of all what middle school has cheerleaders???? And how come Peyton always accedently stabs herself with pencil. Doesnt she learn from her mistakes? I think that the book was ok but it wasn't very belivable. That sort of stuff just doesnt happen in middle school

    4 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2012

    Anonymous

    I didn't want to put it down no matter how late at night it was. (But I always fell asleep around 2)

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2012

    Booklover

    This story was different I like it

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Good book

    Its a good book for everyone and i injoyed it ,i never thougth i would read it

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 164 Customer Reviews

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