Taken [NOOK Book]

Overview

BY 2035 THE RICH have gotten richer, the poor have gotten poorer, and kidnapping has become a major growth industry in the United States. The children of privilege live in secure, gated communities and are escorted to and from school by armed guards.

But the security around Charity Meyers has broken down. On New Year's morning, she wakes and finds herself alone, strapped to a stretcher, in an ambulance that's not moving. She is amazingly calm ...
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Taken

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Overview

BY 2035 THE RICH have gotten richer, the poor have gotten poorer, and kidnapping has become a major growth industry in the United States. The children of privilege live in secure, gated communities and are escorted to and from school by armed guards.

But the security around Charity Meyers has broken down. On New Year's morning, she wakes and finds herself alone, strapped to a stretcher, in an ambulance that's not moving. She is amazingly calm - kids in her neighborhood have been well trained in kidnapping protocol. If this were a normal kidnapping, Charity would be fine. But as the hours of her imprisonment tick by, Charity realizes there is nothing normal about what's going on here. No training could prepare her for what her kidnappers really want . . . and worse, for who they turn out to be.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Bloor (Tangerine) shows top form with a gripping novel, set 30 years in the future, that works as both a thriller and a commentary on the dangerously growing gap between America's rich and poor. Thirteen-year-old Charity Meyers lives with her father, a dermatologist whose wealth has survived the World Credit Crash, and her stepmother, a noxious "vidscreen" personality. Despite all the precautions within the Meyers' high-security housing development, Charity is kidnapped on New Year's Day 2036-the "taken" of the title, also a chess allusion to a didn't-see-it-coming plot twist. Because child-snatching is a major growth industry in South Florida, Charity has been trained to handle the stress and she knows what should happen. Within 24 hours, her parents will empty their home vault of its currency, and she will be freed. Pacing the narrative so readers can feel the clock ticking, the author fills in Charity's back story-the ironic death of her mother to skin cancer, her days at "satschool," where education comes beamed in from an elite Manhattan academy, her home run by Albert and Victoria, the butler and maid whose very names are regulated by Royal Domestic Services. Bloor, whose gimlet-eyed view of modern society has occasionally pushed his narratives to extremes, reigns in the satire to concoct a plausible-enough scenario of the not-too-distant future, adding just the right measure of consciousness-raising in the dialogue between Charity and a teenage abductor. Deftly constructed, this is as riveting as it is thought-provoking. Ages 12-up. (Oct.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
Imagine the insular, privileged, suburban subdivision of Bloor’s masterpiece Tangerine fast-forwarded to 2035. Thirteen-year-old Charity Meyers lives in a Florida gated community where she attends an elite “satschool” through a “vidscreen” satellite connection; at home she is waited on by a maid and butler/ bodyguard provided by the pseudo-British “Royal Domestic Service.” All these layers of protection are supposed to prevent Charity from becoming the latest wealthy kidnapping victim, but on New Year’s Day, they fail. Charity is “taken,” and the clock begins ticking until her father and estranged stepmother can provide the ransom payment that will save her life. The novel alternates between Charity’s interactions with her young, revolutionary kidnapper and her reminiscences of the days preceding her kidnapping, in which she enjoyed the class-based pampering that Dessi and his co-conspirators are now rudely and violently threatening. This succeeds both as a riveting, fast-paced, page-turning thriller and as a scathing piece of thought-provoking social commentary, for the creepy, futuristic world Bloor depicts here is, alarmingly, not that distant from our own. Reviewer: Claudia Mills, Ph.D.
VOYA - Snow Wildsmith
In the near future, the children of the rich and powerful live in constant danger of being kidnapped. They are trained in proper protocol for dealing with kidnappers-do not antagonize, do not cause trouble-so that they will know what to do while their ransom is being negotiated. Charity Meyers has done everything she can think of to be a good hostage, but her kidnappers might be after something more than mere ransom. Bloor often focuses on the disparity between rich and poor, white and nonwhite in the United States, and his newest book is his least subtle at spreading that message. The rich, mostly white youth in Charity's neighborhood are spoiled and unmotivated, whereas those in the nonwhite, poorer neighborhood are interesting and colorful. Some mention is made that "poor does not equal good," but that statement is not followed through in the plot. Characterization is minimal and often stereotypical, although Charity is an interesting main character. She is clueless about the realities of the world outside her enclave, and savvy readers will realize that she is wrong in many of her assumptions. It is a fast read, even with multiple flashbacks, and there are some real surprises that will keep teens reading. The violence is not graphic, and there is little coarse language, making a good fit for middle school readers. But the effect for which Bloor seems to be striving-opening readers' eyes to the divisions in society-is muted by a heavy-handed tone.
School Library Journal

Gr 8 Up
Bloor has written another dark thriller, this one set in the year 2036, when kidnapping is an industry in the United States. When Charity Meyers wakes up in the back of an ambulance, all strapped in, she realizes that she's been taken and that she has only about 12 hours left to live if things don't go according to plan. As the hours go by and the kidnappers' Plan A turns into tragedy, the teen discovers that she can't always count on her instincts about whom to trust. Fast paced and suspenseful, and alternating back and forth between a particular day that Charity chooses to focus on instead of what's happening and the present, the story will keep readers totally involved. However, Charity is the only developed character; most of the others are explored only peripherally through her eyes, leaving readers wanting more and not quite understanding all of their connections. A satisfying conclusion and a good story arc make this a quick read. Although it has elements of dystopian science fiction, it is more of a suspense novel than anything else.
—Sharon Senser McKellarCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375890758
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 11/13/2007
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 271,750
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 274 KB

Meet the Author

Edward Bloor is the author of several acclaimed novels including London Calling and Tangerine. The author lives in Winter Garden, Florida.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

Once you’ve been taken, you usually have twenty-four hours left to live. By my reckoning, that meant I had about twelve hours remaining. The blue numerals on my vidscreen showed the time, 11:31, and the date, 01-01-36. From where I was lying, the blue glow of the vidscreen provided the only color in the room. If it was a room. Other than the screen, all I could see were white walls. All I could hear was a low thrumming, like an engine.
Ever since I’d come to my senses, though, I’d felt strangely calm. Not like a sedated calm, either, although I had definitely been sedated. No, it was more of a logical calm. I was trying not to panic; trying to think things through. I was not in this room of my own free will. Therefore, I was a prisoner. Logically, then, I must have been “taken,” the popular euphemism for “kidnapped.”
If you lived in The Highlands, like I did, then you were an expert on kidnapping. I even wrote a paper on the subject. It was filed right there on my vidscreen, along with the other papers I had written last term: “The World Credit Crash,” “Metric at Midnight, 2031,” and “The Kidnapping Industry.”
I tried to sit up, but I couldn’t. I had a strap tied around my waist, holding me to the bed. Or was it a stretcher? Yes, I remembered. It was a stretcher. I could move my arms, at least. I could reach over and press MENU. The screen was still active, but it looked like all input and output functions had been disabled. Not surprising, if I had been taken. My own files, though, were still accessible to me. I located my recent term papers and clicked on the pertinent one. Here is part of what it said:

The Kidnapping Industry,by Charity Meyers
Mrs.Veck, Grades 7—8
August 30, 2035
Kidnapping has become a major growth industry. Like any industry, though, it is subject to the rules of the marketplace. Rule number one is that the industry must satisfy the needs of its customers.That is, if parents follow the instructions and deliver the currency to the kidnappers, the kidnappers must deliver the taken child back to the parents. If the kidnappers do not fulfill their part of the bargain, then future parents will hear about it, and they will refuse to pay. The trust between the kidnappers and the parents will have broken down. The kidnapping industry today in most areas of the United States usually operates on a twentyfour- hour cycle (although a twelve-hour cycle is not uncommon in areas outside of the United States). In the majority (85%) of cases, the parents deliver the currency and the kidnappers return the child within the twenty-four-hour period. Kidnappers’ demands usually include a warning to parents not to contact the authorities. It is hard to estimate, therefore, how many parents have actually received ransom instructions and obeyed them to the letter. Professional kidnappers always include a Plan B in their instructions, describing a second meeting place in case the first falls through. In a minority (12%) of cases, unprofessional crews have murdered their victims right away and continued the ransom process dishonestly. Several related industries have emerged as a result of the rise in kidnappings. For example, special security companies now track victims who have not been returned but who are thought to be still alive. These companies can gain access to FBI data. Unlike the FBI, however, these companies are willing to search for taken children in unsecured areas of the United States and in foreign countries.


The paper went on from there to describe common aftereffects on taken children and to cite many alarming statistics about kidnapping, supplied by the stateofflorida.gov and TheHighlands.biz content sites. Cases of reported kidnappings increased by 22 percent in the last three years. However, estimates are that unreported kidnappings increased as much as 800 percent in the same time period. The statistics only reinforced what I already knew. It’s what every kid knew: if kidnappers identify your parents as people with a lot of currency in their home vault–dollars, euros, pesos, yuan–then you are a target. And if you don’t get returned right away, there’s not much the authorities can do about it. They are only willing to track you so far. Even now, there are parts of Florida and Texas that are beyond the reach of regular police forces. And from there, who knows? The Caribbean, Mexico, South America? Once you are gone to one of those places, you stay gone.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(28)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 20, 2009

    Reader's Review of the Book: Taken

    In the year 2035, the kidnapping of rich children is quite common and the kids are actually taught how to act in that situation. When the protection surrounding thirteen year-old Charity Meyers, the daughter of a well known and well respected doctor, is torn apart, she is taken from her high-security home in the most exclusive neighborhood in America, called the Highlands. All she can do is hope her parents turn over the ransom demanded by the kidnappers and follow their instructions as best as she can, but when an unexpected turn hits the seemingly standard 24-hour operation, Charity finds that the story behind this kidnapping goes much deeper than she ever would have suspected, and she is forced to make a decision that will forever alter her life. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and all of its twists and turns. I would recommend it to people of all ages. - MBetfort

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 17, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Lynn Crow for TeensReadToo.com

    Ever since her dad invented a super-effective bronzing treatment, Charity's been living the life of the coddled rich, in a guarded estate of a select 120 homes, with servants to see to all of her family's needs. But being rich has its downsides, too -- she can rarely go beyond the walls of the estate, her father and ex-stepmother are too busy with their own lives to concern themselves with hers, and being a rich kid makes her the target of the growing kidnapping industry. <BR/><BR/>When Charity finds herself taken by mysterious men in an ambulance, she decides to follow the rules to the letter to ensure that she'll be delivered safely home as soon as the ransom is paid. But the longer she spends with the kidnappers, the more clear it becomes that their plans are more complicated than she could have imagined. <BR/><BR/>TAKEN puts readers right inside Charity's head, making every moment of the kidnapping as vivid as if they were experiencing it themselves. Charity's reactions are believable and poignant. With every frightening development and shocking twist, readers will find themselves right there with her, quickly turning the pages to learn what will happen next. Charity herself is a strong heroine, practical, scared, yet not afraid to put up a fight when she has to. <BR/><BR/>Readers may have a hard time relating to the world the novel portrays and the isolation in which Charity now lives with her family's newfound wealth. The society seems very strongly divided between the rich and poor, with little room in between. Nonetheless, it provides a pointed commentary on many of the advantages the privileged in today's world take for granted, and the struggles of those who do not have those advantages. TAKEN is sure to provoke thoughtful discussion among its readers. <BR/><BR/>For both its tense and unpredictable story and its social commentary, TAKEN is a great read. Be forewarned -- with so many twists, at least one is guaranteed to take you completely (and pleasantly) by surprise!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2011

    Great Boo! k Great Book!

    I read this book for school and dont regret it! Has great storyline and plot!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 23, 2010

    Good Teen Book

    Bought this book for my daughter whom seems to love it. She states it has a good story etc... Therefore, do recommend reading just for fun and/or for rereading.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Taken Enthusiastically

    Set in three decades into the future, this book shows a ripe new industry: kidnapping. When one rich girl, Charity, is taken by kidnappers for her currency (or money), you experience 2036 when kids are taught how to prepare themselves if they are unlucky enough to be taken, and how what should have been a usual 24 hour holding process turns radically different in Charity's kidnapping case. Bloor does a great job at writing out the story from Charity's point of view and the characters all fit perfectly with each other in the story and the many plot twists.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 28, 2010

    meh

    This book wasnt to interesting. It has a boring main character and its full of expected twists. I only read it because it takes place where I live. Read something else instead of this book.i

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2007

    A reviewer

    You can predict what's going to happen next but it's always different!! It is kind of sad so get Kleenex out!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2013

    Andrew

    Hello

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    Kevin

    Walks in

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    Alex

    Waits

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2013

    Candice

    What? Keep going!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2013

    They dont know what they talkin bout!

    The last two people were so wrong! Taken was a twisty turney amazing suspensul page turning book you will ever read! On ascale from 1 to 10 its an 11!!!!!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2013

    Diamondkit

    Hi im diamondkit. If tou have a clan and are reading this
    1. Search The Help
    2. Hit the first one
    3. Scroll down till you see the review titled diamondkit
    4. Read it.
    5. Answer.
    Thanks!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2012

    Ummm.....

    I read the sample and it was pretty weird. Not bad weird,

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    ........

    This book is really boring. I read the summary thing and it sounded really interesting but its not. Its very slow and dosent have any big turns or exiting events. I mean it was prety good and all but not what i was expecting. I dont think it was worth getting overly exited about:/

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2012

    Im a big book reader and have read many great reads and this is not one of them

    When i saw this i thought wow this should be interesting and keep me guessing but once i started reading thats not what i got at all the main character is kidnapped which is a major indrestry at the time instead of trying to exscape and get some action in the story she decides to go into her head and remember the days before this which was christmas break in exact detail to stop hersself fromm freaking out in the kidnappers ambulence. So basically the stories about a kids christmas break. A REAL LETDOWN SUCH A GOOD IDEA ITS SAD!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Awesome book

    I love this book. It is so cool and mysterious. And ha lots of suspense. But if a little kid were to read it, it wouldn't be very appropriate.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2011

    Not worth it

    Could not get hooked on the book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 10, 2011

    very poor

    i thought it would be soo good a real disappontment

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2010

    Poorly written

    Not very exciting at all. The synopsis made it seem much more entertainig and edgy than it actually was. Very disappointing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews

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