Taking Care of Yoki

Overview

Nothing is ever simple for Barbara Ann, better known as Bob. No matter how hard she tries to do what's right, things always seem to turn out wrong. And there's no one she can turn to for help — her father is away fighting in the war, her mother is too busy, and her grandmother doesn't understand her.

Then Bob finds out that Yoki, the horse who pulls the milk wagon, is going to be sold to the glue factory. Bob is devastated. Yoki is more than a horse — he's her friend. He listens...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $2.49   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$2.49
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(108)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0064401731

Ships from: North Dartmouth, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(147)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Nothing is ever simple for Barbara Ann, better known as Bob. No matter how hard she tries to do what's right, things always seem to turn out wrong. And there's no one she can turn to for help — her father is away fighting in the war, her mother is too busy, and her grandmother doesn't understand her.

Then Bob finds out that Yoki, the horse who pulls the milk wagon, is going to be sold to the glue factory. Bob is devastated. Yoki is more than a horse — he's her friend. He listens to her troubles when no one else will. Bob is determined to save him. But helping Yoki escape makes her a thief. Can doing the wrong thing sometimes be right?

In St. Louis during the Second World War, Bob makes secret plans to save the life of an old horse that pulls the milk delivery wagon.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780064401739
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/13/1986
  • Series: A Trophy Bk.
  • Edition description: 1st Harper trophy ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 176
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 790L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.62 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara Campbell was born in Arkansas and moved to St. Louis, MO, at the age of six. She was a reporter for The New York Times for thirteen years and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1969. Her articles centered on city affairs, civil rights, black culture, and social welfare issues relating to the poor, the elderly, and children. Ms. Campbell lives in New York.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

A Horse Called Yoki

The streetcar screeches to a stop on the corner near my house, and the noise is so loud that everybody riding puts their fingers in their ears. Some lady sitting behind me says, "They ought to put oil on those wheels and rails. That's enough noise to blow your ears off."

I jump up and run to the back to get off. I just get started down the steps when Chuckie Williams pushes ahead of me and knocks my lunch bucket out of my hands. The bucket goes clang, clatter down the steps, and a piece of sweet-potato pie I've been saving just flies out and hits the sidewalk.

"Whatchoo in such a hurry for, Chuckie!" I scream at him, scooping up that squashed-up piece of pie and putting it back in my lunch bucket. "You saw me getting off the streetcar!"

"Ain't seen a thing." He laughs and keeps on running up the sidewalk, dragging his raggedy knapsack behind him. "And if I did, whatchoo goin' to do about it?"

"You just watch out for what I'm going to do about it. Water start running uphill, it'll be so bad!"

He laughs some more at that and keeps on moving.

I don't understand people like Chuckie. He does mean and nasty things just to be doing them. Me, when I do something mean, it's for a good reason.

When I get to the corner of my block, Culpepper Street, I forget all about Chuckie, such a delicious smell is coming out of Jenkins's Bake Shop.

Everybody calls it a bake shop, but Mr. Jenkins doesn't just sell cookies and cake. Somedays he doesn't sell any because it's hard to get enough butter, eggs, and sugar now that the war is on. I guess most of the food has to be sent to the soldiers fighting in the war so they won't starve.

So Mr. Jenkins has to sell other things in his bakery, like the smoked pigs' feet, tails, and knuckles hanging on books in the window. Lucky for me they sell good things in the bake shop too, like red and black jelly candy that look like buttons, sour pickles, and malt balls.

As I pass by, Mr. Jenkins sticks his head out the front door and says, "Hey, you, Bob, Miz Jenkins say come on in out the cold a minute. She got somethin' for ya."

I do a double skip and turn around. The only thing that something could be is something good.

Mr. Jenkins holds the door open for me to come in, and then he goes out to a truck that just parked in front of the shop.

"Hi, Mrs. Jenkins," I say.

She is standing behind the counter wrapping up three cream puffs.

"Hi, Barbara Ann, puddin'," she says, looking up and smiling. She and my teacher at school and the lady who lives upstairs in our rooming house are the only ones to call me by my real name. Everybody else calls me Bob or the nickname to that, Bobby, since I can remember. I guess to some people I look like a Barbara and to others like a Bob or a Bobby.

"I thought I'd give you and your mama and your grandmama somethin' sweet to eat after supper tonight."

"They sure look good, Mrs. Jenkins," I say. My mouth is watering and my stomach begins to growl, I'm so hungry.

"Sorry just a shake a powdered sugar on 'em. Sugar's hard to come by 'cause of this war. Ain't right a cream puff got such a litta bit of sugar on it. A real cream puff need to look like it's covered with snow," she says, putting them into my lunch bucket.

"That's all right, Mrs. Jenkins," I say. "Maybe the war will be over soon. Maybe next month."

"Next month ain't hardly going to come, the war be over," she says.

"I hope it will, because I can't wait much longer."

"You'll wait like everybody else waits. Can't do nothin' but wait," she says.

My eyes begin to well up, and I'm surprised that I feel like crying that bad. I guess I can't stand to hear Mrs. Jenkins telling me that the war is not going to be over and that I have to wait. One thing I hate is doing what everybody else does and another is having to do something I don't want to do and the worst is hearing somebody tell me that.

"Maybe I'm not like everybody else," I say. "I need this war to be over so my daddy can come home and so everything can go back to normal."

"Now, don't everybody want that. But wantin' ain't gettin'."

Mrs. Jenkins is making me tired with that kind of talk. "Maybe the news will say that the war is over. It's possible."

"And then what'll happen?"

"When my daddy comes home, I'll take him off somewhere so we can be by ourselves and I'll tell him what's been bothering me, and I know he'll know what to do about it."

"Can't your mother and your grandmama help you? Just in case the war ain't over tomorrow?"

"Everybody got a way that they help. I just need the way my daddy can help. That's all."

"What's botherin' you so much, you studyin' on your daddy comin' home so bad?"

"I got a lot of things to make up my mind about, like whether I'm going to be baptized this Easter."

"You eight years old going on nine. 'Bout time you decide. Getting baptized just mean you know right from wrong and you ready to do the right things...try, anyway. A lot of people baptized, shouldn't be."

Taking Care of Yoki. Copyright © by Barbara Campbell. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)