BN.com Gift Guide

Taking Measure of Charter Schools: Better Assessments, Better Policymaking, Better Schools

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $66.26
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 26%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $66.26   
  • New (3) from $82.01   
  • Used (2) from $66.26   

Overview

Charter schools offer something that public school systems, parents, and teachers need: a way to experiment with alternative ways of teaching, motivating students, organizing schools, using technology, and employing teachers. While people came down on both sides of support for or against charter schools, everyone was surprised by how difficult it was to assess charter school performance. The first part of this book focuses on how to improve estimates of charter schools' performance, especially their benefits to students who attend them; the second part suggests how policymakers can learn more about charter schools and make better use of evidence. The editors and authors suggest ways states and localities can improve the quality of data on which charter school studies are based and trace some of the ways charter school research influences policy.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice
Taking Measure of Charter Schools, edited by Betts (Univ. of California, San Diego) and Hill (Univ. of Washington, Bothell), guides the reader through the contradictory labyrinth of the current state of charter school research. Its 11 chapters are divided into two parts, 'Improving Research on Charter Schools' and 'How Policymakers Can Make Better Use of Evidence.' Its genesis is the National Charter School Research Project and its Charter School Achievement Panel, on which both of its editors serve. The reader is introduced to a variety of school characteristics....These include selection of target groups, school maturation, teacher characteristics, the nature of admission lotteries, and alternate achievement indicators. The book gains in strength and focus as it progresses. The final several chapters are particularly useful in bringing together the information in the first several chapters. All in all, this is a book that rewards the reader for sticking with it. While it appears to be meant for an audience of policy makers, it is probably best read by researchers, who will find the effort well worth it. Summing Up: Recommended.
Tim Sass
Charter schools are by far the most important form of school choice in the U.S., yet making sense of the often conflicting research on their efficacy can be a daunting task. Julian Betts, Paul Hill, and the contributing authors clearly lay out the challenges in evaluating charter school performance, critically evaluate what existing research tells us (and doesn't tell us) about charters, and offer suggestions on how best to expand our knowledge of the successes and shortcomings of the charter school movement. This book is an invaluable guide for anyone interested in getting past the sometimes shrill debate over charter schools and truly understanding this prominent component of educational reform.
Larry Rosenstock
Finally! Research on charter schools that goes beyond politics and beyond standardized test scores. This book is full of important information about charter schools: their teachers, long-term student outcomes, lotteries, and more. It shows the complexity of charter schools and the wide range of differences among them. It should put to rest the gross oversimplifications—both positive and negative—so often bandied about on the subject. I hope that it will be read by policymakers far and wide.
Anthony S. Bryk
Taking Measure of Charter Schools underscores the necessity of accumulating a reliable evidence base on the performance of charter schools, especially given the many questions, the different legal configurations, and the multiple purposes of chartering efforts. The editors demonstrate that getting good answers to questions about the capacity of these schools to advance demonstrable broad-based improvements in teaching and learning requires both intellectual tenacity and considerable analytic skill.
CHOICE
Taking Measure of Charter Schools, edited by Betts (Univ. of California, San Diego) and Hill (Univ. of Washington, Bothell), guides the reader through the contradictory labyrinth of the current state of charter school research. Its 11 chapters are divided into two parts, 'Improving Research on Charter Schools' and 'How Policymakers Can Make Better Use of Evidence.' Its genesis is the National Charter School Research Project and its Charter School Achievement Panel, on which both of its editors serve. The reader is introduced to a variety of school characteristics....These include selection of target groups, school maturation, teacher characteristics, the nature of admission lotteries, and alternate achievement indicators. The book gains in strength and focus as it progresses. The final several chapters are particularly useful in bringing together the information in the first several chapters. All in all, this is a book that rewards the reader for sticking with it. While it appears to be meant for an audience of policy makers, it is probably best read by researchers, who will find the effort well worth it. Summing Up: Recommended.
Inc. Book News
Betts (economics, U. of California, San Diego) and Hill (Center on Reinventing Public Education, U. of Washington Bothell) compile 11 essays by education and economics scholars from the US who look at ways to measure the success of charter schools. The book is a result of an initiative by the National Charter School Research Project to review research and suggest ways parents, educators, and policy makers can assess charter school performance. Chapters consider how to improve estimates of performance, especially to benefit their students, and how policy makers can learn more about charter schools and make better use of evidence. They address achievement results, nontest outcomes, existing studies of achievement, selectivity bias, lotteries, maturation, data on teachers, state studies, the political uses of research, and ways to improve the quality of data.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781607093589
  • Publisher: R&L Education
  • Publication date: 5/16/2010
  • Series: New Frontiers in Education Series
  • Pages: 230
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Julian R. Betts is professor of economics and chair of the Department of Economics at the University of California, San Diego. He also serves as a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and an adjunct fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC). He is also a member of the National Charter School Research Project's Charter School Achievement Consensus Panel. Paul T. Hill is the John and Marguerite Corbally Professor at the University of Washington Bothell and Director of the Center on Reinventing Public Education. He also chairs the National Charter School Research Project and leads its Charter School Achievement Consensus Panel, which authored the influential paper, Key Issues in Studying Charter Schools and Achievement: A Review and Suggestions for National Guidelines (May 2006).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Through a Glass Darkly: An Introduction to Issues in Measuring the Quality of Charter Schools Part 2 Part One: Improving Research On Charter Schools Chapter 3 Madness in the Method? A Critical Analysis of Popular Methods of Estimating the Effect of Charter Schools on Student Achievement Chapter 4 Expanding What Counts When Evaluating Charter School Effectiveness Chapter 5 The Effect of Attending Charter Schools on Achievement, Educational Attainment and Behavioral Outcomes: A Review Chapter 6 The Selection of Students into Charter Schools: A Critical Issue for Research and Policy Chapter 7 Admission Lotteries in Charter Schools Chapter 8 Charter School Maturation as a Factor in Performance Assessment and Accountability Chapter 9 What Do We Know About Teachers in Charter Schools? Part 10 Part Two: How Policymakers Can Make Better Use of Evidence Chapter 11 The State of State Charter School Research Chapter 12 Would Better Research Lead to Better Schools? Chapter 13 Conclusions about Charter School Policy and Research

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)