Taking the Anxiety out of Taking Tests

Taking the Anxiety out of Taking Tests

4.0 1
by Susan Johnson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

YOU ENTER THE CLASSROOM and take your seat. The palms of your hands start to sweat. When the teacher passes out the test, your mind suddenly goes blank. You studied hard for this test, but now you feel as though you can't remember a thing. As you struggle through each question, panic sets in. Then negative thoughts crowd out all others, and your body

Overview

YOU ENTER THE CLASSROOM and take your seat. The palms of your hands start to sweat. When the teacher passes out the test, your mind suddenly goes blank. You studied hard for this test, but now you feel as though you can't remember a thing. As you struggle through each question, panic sets in. Then negative thoughts crowd out all others, and your body tenses. You skip questions, recheck your answers, and tell yourself, "I'm going to fail."

Test-taking anxiety grips each of us at some point, but you do not have to let your fear overwhelm you in this way. In Taking the Anxiety Out of Taking Tests, Susan Johnson reveals the key to working through your anxiety: becoming aware of your thoughts and physical sensations so that you can turn the pattern of destructive self-talk and nervousness into positive assertions of confidence and relaxation. She provides step-by-step exercises, describes techniques to help you cope with full-blown anxiety, and offers a wealth of suggestions to help you focus your attention, stop procrastinating, manage your time better, and more effectively learn and remember material.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760719268
Publisher:
Sterling Publishing
Publication date:
04/01/2000
Pages:
151

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Taking the Anxiety Out of Taking Tests 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Inexpensive and not a bad little book! I came across it by accident. It appears to be addressing college students who haven't figured things out yet, but it's possibly the serious high school student who might profit most. It should prove useful to more than just anxious test takers. The last chapter, "Learning How To Learn", is an excellent short summary of study methods. It seems to describe many of the techniques that I, probably through trial and error, found myself relying on by the time I was finishing college and going on to graduate school. There are certainly other more detailed books available, but this one is a very easy read and I think that the last chapter alone is worth the few dollars the book costs --- especially to high schoolers, college frosh, and others who are still anxiously trying to get a grip on things in school.