Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy and Religion in The Matrix

Overview


This thought-provoking examination of The Matrix explores the technological challenges, religious symbolism, and philosophical dilemmas the film presents. Essays by renowned scientists, technologists, philosophers, scholars, social commentators, and science fiction authors provide engaging and provocative perspectives. Explored in a highly accessible fashion are issues such as the future of artificial intelligence and virtual reality. The symbolism hidden throughout The Matrix and a few ...
See more details below
Paperback (First Trade Paper Edition)
$16.45
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$17.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (58) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $10.79   
  • Used (52) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview


This thought-provoking examination of The Matrix explores the technological challenges, religious symbolism, and philosophical dilemmas the film presents. Essays by renowned scientists, technologists, philosophers, scholars, social commentators, and science fiction authors provide engaging and provocative perspectives. Explored in a highly accessible fashion are issues such as the future of artificial intelligence and virtual reality. The symbolism hidden throughout The Matrix and a few glitches in the film are revealed. Discussions include “Finding God in The Matrix,” “The Reality Paradox in The Matrix,” and “Was Cypher Right?: Why We Stay in Our Matrix.” The fascinating issues posed by the film are handled in an intelligent but nonacademic fashion.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781932100020
  • Publisher: BenBella Books, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/28/2003
  • Series: Smart Pop Series
  • Edition description: First Trade Paper Edition
  • Pages: 280
  • Sales rank: 953,388
  • Product dimensions: 6.04 (w) x 9.14 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Glenn Yeffeth is a writer, editor, and columnist. He is the editor of a biography of Joss Whedon and a nonfiction anthology of essays about Buffy the Vampire Slayer. He lives in Dallas, Texas.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2004

    Incite Into Science, Philosophy, Religion, and Yourself

    Red Pill is definetly a look into the complexities that the Wachowski's have woven through their trilogy, but there is also a look into A.I. and it's future in society, and concepts like solipsism. When read thoroughly, the book caused me to question my reality, which was a very good thing. Perhaps it won't be as dramatic for you, but if you feel interested to delve further into the machinations of Wachowski, by all means, read this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2004

    We are all here to do what we are all here to do ...

    The 'Matrix' films were fine action adventures that also served to introduce a number of mythological and philosophical themes to a new generation of inquirers. As in Genesis and in Milton's great epic, the meta-question(s) explored in these films is: 'What is freedom in a rule-governed universe, is it even possible, and what is the price that we willingly pay for it?' Neo's 'hero's journey' is the journey of every person choosing freedom, which implies the possiblity of error and evil, and of coming to a reconciliation both with one's own capacity for hate (the struggle against the shadow, agent 'Smith') and acceptance of nature and the inevitability of death, the 'return to the source.' The goal of this journey is what the great psychologist, Carl Jung called 'individuation' -- the achievement of oneself, becoming what one is. In the end, this process of individuation is 'what we are all here to do.' This book puts the pieces together for the curious students of the film and, like the movie, it is great fun. Too bad there are not lots of pictures of Monica Belluci in a tight skirt here, but otherwise, the book is worth it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2003

    Thought provoking read

    I found the topics discussed in this book extremely interesting. Not only did I learn more about themes in 'the Matrix' but other topics including Buddhism, science fiction, and schools of philosophical thought. This is the first book of its kind that I've read and sparked my interest in reading more on philosophy and science fiction.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2003

    Review

    This book is great. It covers so much philosopihcal background on how 'the matrix' came to exitence. Very Kewl...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)