Takk...

( 12 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Steve Klinge
After the somber dirges of their untitled third album, Sigur Rós return to what they do best on Takk... As on 1999's brilliant Ágætis Byrjun, the Icelandic troupe create spacious, crescendo-filled art-rock symphonies that are overwhelmingly beautiful. Takk... is the Icelandic band's brightest, most upbeat album, with Jónsi Birgisson's angelic voice soaring into the stratosphere multi-tracked, he sounds like a boys' choir, and with tinkling chimes and trebly piano and keyboards taking newly prominent roles among the band's trademark kettle drums, bowed guitars, and cinematic strings. Many tracks expand and contract over the course of six or more minutes, and while ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Steve Klinge
After the somber dirges of their untitled third album, Sigur Rós return to what they do best on Takk... As on 1999's brilliant Ágætis Byrjun, the Icelandic troupe create spacious, crescendo-filled art-rock symphonies that are overwhelmingly beautiful. Takk... is the Icelandic band's brightest, most upbeat album, with Jónsi Birgisson's angelic voice soaring into the stratosphere multi-tracked, he sounds like a boys' choir, and with tinkling chimes and trebly piano and keyboards taking newly prominent roles among the band's trademark kettle drums, bowed guitars, and cinematic strings. Many tracks expand and contract over the course of six or more minutes, and while they're usually structured around several crashing epiphanies, they get there in different ways. The euphoric, triumphant "Hoppipolla" quickly rises on a music box–like keyboard figure, pounding drums, and eerie voices -- then pauses before ascending further on orchestral strings, horns, and impossibly pretty vocals. "Sé lest" begins with a hypnotic, circular pattern, first played on what sounds like a vibraphone and later picked up by piano and chimes, which then cede to an oom-pah-pah horn fanfare before fading into a creaky electronic coda. Sigur Rós are masters of music that swoons and is swoon-inducing.
All Music Guide - Andy Kellman
A strange thing happens before the two-minute mark in "Saeglopur." All the twinkling and cooing erupts, at what might seem like eight minutes earlier than normal, into a cathartic blast of tautly constructed group noise -- or, as those who prefer songs and motion over moods and atmospheres might say, "The good part comes." "Saeglopur" is emblematic of Sigur Rós' fourth album, released nearly three years ! after . Nothing resembles a drone, and no part of it could be described as funereal. Even so, Takk... is still very much a Sigur Rós album, due in large part to the ever-present otherworldly vocals, but also because the only real changes are the activeness of some arrangements -- arrangements that deploy a familiar combination of bass, drums, piano, vocals, lots of strings, and some horns -- and some of the colors that are used. Despite opening with what sounds like a happy walk through a snow bank, the album is just as suited for a sunlit spring morning as was suited for a winter trudge across a foggy moor, so in that sense, it isn't a repeat and is more tactile than illusory, but it's not likely to win over anyone who suddenly felt an index finger push against the back of his throat while hearing "Svefn-G-Englar" for the first time. And it's not as if the band is suddenly writing three-minute pop songs, either. Half of the album's tracks are longer than six minutes, with extended cresting, sudden bursts of action, and a couple particularly fragile moments that seem to be on the brink of melting away. One thing to consider when wondering whether or not this band has changed in any way: they've gone from providing the background music to death announcements to "Sé Lest," a fluttering children's lullaby that is briefly crashed by an even more gleeful oom-pah-pah brass band.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/13/2005
  • Label: Geffen Records
  • UPC: 602498845233
  • Catalog Number: 000534502
  • Sales rank: 19,830

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Takk... (1:57)
  2. 2 Glósóli (6:15)
  3. 3 Hoppípolla (4:28)
  4. 4 Meo Blódnasir (2:17)
  5. 5 Sé Lest (8:40)
  6. 6 Saeglopur (7:38)
  7. 7 Milanó (10:25)
  8. 8 Gong (5:33)
  9. 9 Andvari (6:40)
  10. 10 Svo Hljótt (7:24)
  11. 11 Heysátan (4:09)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Sigur Rós Primary Artist
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Worth every cent you might pay for it.

    Ok, first off, I want to say that this album is more amazing than most you will listen to in your life time for the main reason that it can take you to places, mentally, you might not have experienced. Don't get me wrong, all their albums are great in my opinion but this one seems to be a little easier to take for people that haven't heard much of their material. Any of their albums will be a little odd for people not use to this music, but will turn into gems with time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    i like

    this is the best band i've ever heard. seen them live. they are the best band i've ever seen as well.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Takk is Beautiful

    In their newest album, Sigur Ros creates wonderful music, sending the listener into another world of sounds, almost too magical to fathom. They have a gift and they use it well. Track 8 is amazing. Listen and enjoy Takk and let it trasport you to another atmosphere of sounds and dreamscapes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Requiem for Summer, Prelude to Fall

    It has been a long, long time since Sigur Ros’ previous release “( )” in 2002, but well worth the wait. “Takk” (Icelandic for “thanks”) still employs the group’s hauntingly beautiful style and epic soundscapes of understated lulls, emotional climaxes, guitars moaning under the cello bow, and Jónsi Birgisson’s heavenly falsetto. It is however, a more upbeat album than “( ).” I do not believe there is any way to truly put words to their music, simply because it’s nearly impossible to be cognizant that you’re actually listening to it. Every time I lie down and listen to this album in its entirety, I end up drifting off into my own special world. But I’ll have a go at it anyways. Sigur Ros is one of the few contemporary bands out there that makes albums for the sake of albums everything ebbs, flows, and fits together just perfectly. It’s the kind of album you need to listen to its entirety to get the full musical experience. Specifically, there are several stand-out tracks on “Takk” - the foremost being “Seaglopur.” I absolutely cannot stop listening to it. It’s like a spring day, a rebirth. The song that will suddenly appear at the top of your iTunes “most played” list. Its repetitive and understated piano lines accompanied by an airy, ethereal voice gives the song the feel of an Icelandic lullaby. After a few listens you’ll catch yourself trying to play “air piano” to this song. While it seems out of character for Sigur Ros, one might even say they “rock out” at the end of the song. Coming in at a close second is “Gong.” Its placement in the track listing is just perfect. The previous track, “Milano,” exits by completely by fading into silence – but just long enough for you to snap out of it and think… damn, it’s over already? Then, almost just as that thought is finishing, the melancholy yet inviting violin of “Gong” catches your ears, slowly layered upon by a discordant guitar and fast-paced snare drum. Like Radiohead’s “Climbing up the Walls” it takes you away to a darker place, but, brings you back to the overall mood of “Takk” by the end. The ending of the album is strangely familiar and completely lulling. The final song, “Heysatan” quietly tapers off into silence, broken only by the clatter of discarded drumsticks which differentiates this moment of silence from any other on the album. The show’s over. Very similar to the crackle of a suddenly unplugged guitar at the end of “( ),” and just as effective. The only think I missed about the conclusion of “Takk” is a song along the lines of “Untitled #8,” which captured so much energy in “( )” and provided such an orgasmic release. (Especially when you hear it live, it overtakes you, gives such a transcendent experience.) If you thought “( )” was a too reminiscent of a funeral, but still enjoyed it, you’ll find “Takk” imaginative and beautiful. If you’re one of those who has heard a few tracks, liked what you heard, but are unsure how you’ll feel about Sigur Ros’ music as a whole, try this album out - it is quite possibly one of their most accessible. Still, if you thought 1999’s “Agaetis Byrjun” was a bit too “art house” for your tastes, then “Takk” will be just about as welcoming as a swift kick to the side. “Takk” is the perfect listen for a crisp Fall day, for getting lost within yourself, or just escaping to nowhere. It just makes life feel better.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Simply beeeeautiful.

    These Icelandic chums are amazing. The raw beauty and emotion they portray is astounding. I,for one, am glad I can't underestand a word they say (whether in Icelandic or otherwise)because it might disrupt the pure fragility of their sound. This album is a must for any fan of beautiful music.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2008

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    Posted November 15, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2009

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