TAKS English Language Arts, Exit Level (REA)

Overview


TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge & Skills) Exit Level English Language Arts

REA helps Texas students get ready for TAKS Exit Level English Language Arts!

- Provides the instruction and practice students need to pass the test
- In-depth TAKS review covers all test topics
- Fully aligned with the ...

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Overview


TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge & Skills) Exit Level English Language Arts

REA helps Texas students get ready for TAKS Exit Level English Language Arts!

- Provides the instruction and practice students need to pass the test
- In-depth TAKS review covers all test topics
- Fully aligned with the objectives created by the Texas Education Agency
- Color icons for easy navigation of questions, tips, and key concepts
- Students at all levels will benefit from the many reading passages and sample essays in this test prep
- 2 full-length TAKS practice tests with detailed answer explanations
- Fully indexed to find topics easily

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780738601946
  • Publisher: Research & Education Association
  • Publication date: 8/11/2006
  • Series: STUDY AIDS
  • Edition description: First
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 943,924
  • Age range: 15 years
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Succeeding on the TAKS English Language Arts
About This Book
This book will provide you with an accurate and complete representation of the English Language Arts sections of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). Inside you will find reviews that are designed to provide you with the information and strategies needed to do well on these tests. Two practice tests (which include a reading and written composition section and a revising and edit-ing section) are provided, both of which are based on the official TAKS. The practice tests contain every type of question that you can expect to encounter on the TAKS English Language Arts tests. Following each test, you will find an answer key with detailed explanations designed to help you com-pletely understand the test material.
About the Test
Who Takes the Test and What Is It Used For?
Texas law requires that students must pass all parts of the Exit Level TAKS to receive a high school diploma from a Texas public school. The Exit Level TAKS includes four subject areas: English lan-guage arts, mathematics, social studies, and science. The questions on the English language arts test are based on objectives that test students on basic understanding, literary elements and tech-niques, analysis and evaluation, a written composition, and revising and -editing skills. These objec-tives are used to assess the Student Expectations outlined in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS).
When and Where Is the Test Given?
These four Exit Level TAKS tests are given to students for the first time in the spring of their eleventh-grade year. The TAKS is not timed. Students are allowed to have as much time as necessary to re-spond to every test item. Retests are given for students who do not pass the TAKS. Students are al-lowed to use highlighters and colored pencils in the test booklet to emphasize important information. They are also allowed to use a dictionary and thesaurus on the reading and writing portions of the test but not on the revision and edition section.
Is There a Registration Fee?
No. Because all Texas public high-school students are required to take the TAKS pass the test in or-der to receive a high school diploma, no fee is required.
Test Accommodations and Special Situations
Every effort is made to provide a level playing field for students with disabilities taking the TAKS and seeking a standard high-school diploma. The decision to use a particular accommodation with a stu-dent is made on an individual basis and takes into consideration both the needs of the student and whether the student routinely receives the accommodation in the classroom and when taking tests. If a student receives special education services, all accommodations must be documented in the stu-dents individualized education program (IEP).
Additional Information and Support
Additional resources to help you prepare to take the TAKS include:
d the official TAKS website at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/taks/booklets/index.html d the Texas Education Agency at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/
How to Use This Book
What Do I Study First?
Read over the review sections and the suggestions for test-taking. Studying the review sections thor-oughly will reinforce the basic skills you need to do well on the test. Be sure to take the practice tests to become familiar with the format and procedures involved with taking the actual TAKS.
When Should I Start Studying?
It is never too early to start studying for the TAKS. The earlier you begin, the more time you will have to sharpen your skills. Do not procrastinate! Cramming is not an effective way to study, since it does now allow you the time needed to learn the test material. The sooner you learn the format of the exam, the more time you will have to familiarize yourself with the exam content.
Format of the TAKS English Language Arts
The English Language Arts section of the TAKS is designed to test students' ability to read and write, understand and remember basic literary concepts, and revise a composition so that it is grammati-cally correct. Students will be asked 28 multiple-choice items and three open-ended items based on reading passages. They will write an essay in response to a writing prompt and will answer 20 multi-ple-choice questions about revising and editing.
The types of passages included on TAKS ELA are as follows:
d a literary selection d an expository (informational) selection d a one-page viewing and representing piece
The two passages and one-page viewing and representing piece will have a common theme and are referred to as a triplet. The combined length of the triplet is about 3,000 to 3,500 words and the paragraphs of the literary and informational passages are numbered for easy reference. Students will also write a composition in response to a writing prompt.
Scoring the Tests
Multiple-choice questions on the TAKS have only one correct answer. Because of this, these items are machine-scored.
Open-ended items, also called short-answer items, require students to write a brief response. Open-ended items are based on the literary or expository selections only; no open-ended items ad-dress the viewing and representing piece. These items assess Objectives 2 and 3 only and may be based on either an individual selection or both selections.
For open-ended items that address one selection, students have five lines to respond on the an-swer document. However, for items that ask students to make a connection between the literary and expository selections, students have eight lines to respond.
Students' responses to open-ended items are scored based on content; writing conventions are not taken into consideration unless the frequency and/or severity of errors causes clarity problems. Possible scores for open-ended response are 0 (insufficient), 1 (partially sufficient), 2 (sufficient), and 3 (exemplary).
Students' compositions-their responses to the writing prompt-are evaluated on a scale from 1 to 4. Compositions are scored for both rhetorical effectiveness (Objective 4) and the conventions of standard written English (Objective 5).
Test-Taking Strategies
What to Do Before the Test d Pay attention in class.
d Carefully work through the review sections of this book. Mark any topics that you find difficult so that you can focus on them while studying and get extra help if necessary.
d Take the practice tests and become familiar with the format of the TAKS. When you are practicing, simulate the conditions under which you will be taking the actual test. Stay calm and pace yourself. After simulating the test only a couple of times, you will feel more confident, and this will boost your chances of doing well.
d Students who have difficulty concentrating or taking tests in general may have test anxiety. Tell your parents, a teacher, a counselor, the school nurse, or a school psychologist well in advance of the test. They may be able to suggest some useful strategies to help you feel more relaxed so that you can do your best on the test.
What to Do During the Test d Read all of the possible answers. Just because you think you have found the correct response, do not automatically assume that it is the best answer. Read through each answer choice to be sure that you are not making a mistake by jumping to conclusions.
d Use the process of elimination. Go through each answer to a question and eliminate as many of the answer choices as possible. By eliminating two answer choices, you will give yourself a better chance of getting the item correct since there will only be two choices left to choose from.
d Work quickly and steadily and avoid focusing on any one question for too long. Taking the practice tests in this book will help you learn to budget your time on the actual test.
d Work on the easiest questions first. If you find yourself working too long on one question, make a mark next to it on your test booklet and continue. After you have answered all of the questions that you know, go back to the ones that you skipped.
d Be sure that the answer oval you are marking corresponds to the number of the question in the test booklet. Since the multiple-choice sections are graded by machine, marking one wrong answer can throw off your answer key and your score. Be extremely careful.
d Work from the answer choices. You can use a multiple-choice format to your advantage by working backwards from the answer choices to answer the question. You may be able to make an educated guess based on eliminating choices that you know do not fit the question.
TAKS Objectives*
Section 1: Reading
Chapters Objectives
Chapter 1: Vocabulary, Part 1 Objective 1: The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of culturally diverse written texts.
(6) The student acquires an extensive vocabulary through reading and systematic word study. The student is expected to
(B) replay on context to determine meanings of words and phrases such as figurative language and technical vocabulary
(C ) apply meanings of prefixes, roots, and suffixes in order to comprehend
(E) use reference materials such as glossary, dictionary to determine precise meanings and usage
Chapter 2: Vocabulary, Part 2 Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written texts and visual representations.
(6) The student acquires an extensive vocabulary through reading and systematic word study. The student is expected to
(F) discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotative power of words
(G) read and understand analogies
Chapter 3: Summarizing Objective 1: The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of culturally diverse written texts.
(7) The student comprehends selections using a variety of strategies. The student is expected to
(F) produce summaries of texts by identifying main ideas and their supporting details.
(8) The student reads extensively and intensively for different purposes and in varied sources, including American literature. The student is expected to
(B) read in varied sources such as diaries, journals, textbooks, maps, newspapers, letters, speeches, memoranda
(C ) read American and other world literature, including classic and contemporary works.
Chapter 4: Literature Objective 2
The student will demonstrate an understanding of the effects of literary elements and techniques in culturally diverse written texts.
(10) The student expresses and supports responses to various types of texts.
(B) use elements of text to defend, clarify, and negotiate responses and interpretations.
(11) The student analyzes literary elements for their contributions to meaning in literary texts. The student is expected to:
(A) compare and contrast varying aspects of texts such as themes, conflicts, and allusions both within and across texts;
(B) analyze relevance of setting and time frame to text's meaning;
(C) describe and analyze the development of plot and identify conflicts and how they are addressed and resolved;
(D) analyze [the melodies of] literary language, including its use of evocative words and rhythms;
(E) connect literature to historical contexts, current events, [and his/her own experiences]
(F) understand literary forms and terms such as author, drama, biography, myth, tall tale, dialogue, tragedy and comedy, [structure in poetry, epic, ballad,] protagonist, antagonist, paradox, analogy, dialect, and comic relief as appropriate to the selections being read.
Chapter 5: Inferences and Conclusions Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written texts and visual representations.
(7) The student comprehends selections using a variety of strategies. The student is expected to
(E) analyze text structures such as compare/contrast, cause/effect, and chronological ordering for how they influence understanding
(G) draw inferences such as conclusions, generalizations, and predictions and support them with text evidence [and experience]
(12) The student reads critically to evaluate texts and the authority of sources. The student is expected to
(A) analyze the characteristics of clearly written texts, including the patterns of organization, syntax, and word choice
Chapter 6: Evaluating Information Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written texts and visual representations
(12) The student reads critically to evaluate texts and the authority of sources. The student is expected to
(B) evaluate the credibility of information sources, including how the writer's motivation may affect that credibility; and
(C) recognize logical, deceptive, and/or faulty modes of persuasion in texts.

Section 2: Viewing And Writing
Chapter 7: Viewing Objective 3: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze and critically evaluate culturally diverse written texts and visual representations
(19) The student understands and interprets visual representations. The student is expected to:
(B) analyze relationships, ideas, [and cultures] as represented in various media; and
(C) distinguish the purposes of various media forms such as informative texts, entertaining texts, and advertisements.
(20) The student analyzes and critiques the significance of visual representations. The student is expected to:
(B) deconstruct media to get the main idea of the message's content;
(C) evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.
Chapter 8: Writing an Essay Objective 4 The student will, within a given context, produce an effective composition for a specific purpose.
Objective 5 The student will produce a piece of writing that demonstrates a command of the conventions of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, usage, and sentence structures.
Chapter 9: Revising and Editing Objective 6 The student will demonstrate the ability to revise and proofread to improve the clarity and effectiveness of a piece of writing.

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Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS
About REA
Acknowledgments
Succeeding on the TAKS English Language Arts
  About This Book
  About the Test
  How to Use This Book
  Format of the TAKS English Language Arts
  Scoring of the Tests
  Test-Taking Strategies
  TAKS Objectives
Section 1: English Language Arts
Chapter 1: Vocabulary, Part 1
Context Clues
Word Structure
Reference Materials
Selection 1: Excerpt from Wuthering Heights
Selection 2: Indianola: A Texas Ghost Town
Selection 3: The Six Nations of the Iroquois
Selection 4: Twins
Chapter 1 Answers
Chapter 2: Vocabulary, Part 2
Connotative and Denotative Meanings
Selection 1: A Superstition Mission
Selection 2: Excerpt from Up From Slavery
Selection 3: Don't Sweat Global Warming
Selection 4: William Shakespeare: Poet and Playwright
Chapter 2 Answers
Chapter 3: Summarizing
Reading Comprehension
Reading/Variety of Texts
Selection 1: Ripe Figs
Selection 2: The Coolest Invention
Selection 3: The Thinking Spot
Selection 4: MP3: Decompressed
Chapter 3 Answers
Chapter 4: Literature
Literary Elements
Selection 1: Excerpt from Winesburg, Ohio
Selection 2: Excerpt from "The Hypnotist"
Selection 3: Excerpt from The Importance
  of Being Earnest
Selection 4: Excerpt from "The False Gems"
Chapter 4 Answers
Chapter 5: Inferences and Conclusions
Analyzing Text Structure
Drawing Inferences
Analyzing Textual Characteristics
Selection 1: Fuel of the Future
Selection 2: Safe at Sixteen?
Selection 3: The Yellow Wall-Paper
Selection 4: Curious Crop Circles
Chapter 5 Answers
Chapter 6: Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Selection 1: Lively Lizards
Selection 2: Glorytown Gazette
Selection 3: The Truth About Year-Round Education
Selection 4: More than Light Itself
Chapter 6 Answers
Section 2: Viewing And Writing
Chapter 7: Viewing
Understanding Visual Representations
Selection 1
Selection 2
Selection 3
Selection 4
Chapter 7 Answers
Chapter 8: Writing an Essay
Introduction
TAKS Writing Prompt
Developing Your Essay
How Essays Are Graded
Chapter 9: Revising and Editing
Selection 1
Selection 2
Chapter 9 Answers

Practice Test 1
Practice Test 1 Answers

Practice Test 2
Practice Test 2 Answers

Practice Test 1 Answer Sheets
Practice Test 2 Answer Sheets

Index
Photo Image Credits

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