A Tale Dark and Grimm (Grimm Series #1)

A Tale Dark and Grimm (Grimm Series #1)

4.6 280
by Adam Gidwitz, Hugh D'Andrade
     
 

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Hansel and Gretel walk out of their own story and into eight other classic Grimm (and Grimm-inspired) fairy tales. An irreverent, witty narrator leads us through encounters with witches, warlocks, dragons, and the devil himself. As the siblings roam a forest brimming with menacing foes, they learn the true story behind the famous tales, as well as how to take…  See more details below

Overview


Hansel and Gretel walk out of their own story and into eight other classic Grimm (and Grimm-inspired) fairy tales. An irreverent, witty narrator leads us through encounters with witches, warlocks, dragons, and the devil himself. As the siblings roam a forest brimming with menacing foes, they learn the true story behind the famous tales, as well as how to take charge of their destinies and create their own happily ever after. Because once upon a time, fairy tales were awesome.

"Unlike any children's book I've ever read. [It] holds up to multiple rereadings, like the classic I think it will turn out to be." - New York Times Book Review

"An audacious debut that's wicked smart and wicked funny." - Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Addictively compelling." - School Library Journal, starred review

"Charming and inventive . . . the perfect haunted book." - The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

"One of the year's best children's books." - The Virginian-Pilot

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Editorial Reviews

Marjorie Ingall
…unlike any children's book I've ever read…Heavy. And yet…really, really funny…The tone ricochets between lyrical and goofy…And it all works. As the story progresses, it gets less and less faithful to the source material and becomes its own increasingly rich and strange thing…My 8-year-old daughter, a tough critic who doesn't like scary books, read A Tale Dark & Grimm three times, back to back. She was enchanted, not terrified. And no wonder. A Tale Dark & Grimm holds up to multiple rereadings, like the classic I think it will turn out to be.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Hansel and Gretel actually had their heads chopped off. Who knew? If that statement sends you scrambling for your favorite search engine, Gidwitz is savoring that reaction. And for readers who shriek with bloodthirsty delight, not skepticism, he has much more in store. Fracturing the folk tales of the Brothers Grimm, Gidwitz brings together old and new traditions of matter-of-fact horror. Hansel and Gretel become recurring characters in reworked versions of the Grimms' lesser-known tales, such as "Faithful Johannes" and "The Seven Ravens" (here, "The Seven Swallows"). The children are seeking a "nice" family after their father, no woodcutter but a king, pulls the aforementioned beheading stunt ("hey believed firmly in their little hearts that parents should not kill their children"). The perfect family proves elusive, and the children must extricate themselves from one outrageous situation after another--including, yes, a hungry old woman in an edible house. The rhythms and rhetoric of the prose are heavily influenced by verbal storytelling, which can on occasion strike a false note, but mostly add the intended wry wink to an audacious debut that's wicked smart and wicked funny. Ages 10–up. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—The Grimm folk and fairy tales have never been for the fainthearted, and neither is Adam Gidwitz's novel (Dutton, 2010). Traditional folktales collected by the Brothers Grimm have been recast with Hansel and Gretel providing the connection between them. The account for which the siblings are best known (the one with less than caring parents and a house made of sweets inhabited by a child-eating adult) is recognizable as are nuggets of other familiar tales, but each has been reinvented with a particular, sometimes peculiar twist. The stories come to life through the unique voice and fine pacing of Johnny Heller. He assumes various accents for different characters, and as narrator, inserts himself to warn listeners when a part gets really dreadful. Chapters end with cliffhangers (of sorts), sure to please those who enjoy grisly tales, gruesome events, and righteousness rewarded.—Maria Salvadore, formerly Washington DC Public Library
From the Publisher
Accolades for A Tale Dark & Grimm:
New York Times bestseller
• Selection on the Today Show’s Al’s Book Club for Kids
• NCTE Notable Children’s Books in the Language Arts Selection
• An E. B. White Read Aloud Honor Book
New York Times Editors’ Choice pick
Publishers Weekly Flying Start
School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
• ALA Notable Book
 
“Unlike any children’s book I’ve ever read . . . [it] holds up to multiple re-readings, like the classic I think it will turn out to be.”—New York Times Book Review
“A marvelous reworking of old stories that manages to be fresh, frightening, funny, and humane.”—Wall Street Journal

Accolades for In a Glass Grimmly:
New York Times bestseller
• A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2012
• A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2012
• A School Librry Journal Best Book of 2012
 
 “Gidwitz is back with a second book that, if possible, outshines A Tale Dark & Grimm.”—School Library Journal, starred review
 
 “Compulsively readable.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review
 
“Gory, hilarious, touching, and lyrical all at once, with tons of kid appeal.”—The Horn Book
 
“Adam Gidwitz leads us into creepy forests, gruesome deeds, terrible monsters, and—far worse—the dark places of the human heart. It’s horrible . . . and I LOVED it!”—Tom Angleberger, author of The Strange Case of Origami

Children's Literature - Jeannine Stickle
Hansel and Gretel serve as the connecting thread that runs through Gidwitz's enthusiastic and gory retelling of six Grimm fairy tales. The story begins with Hansel and Gretel as they are betrayed by their parents, who are a king and queen in this retelling. The brother and sister decide to run away on a quest to find better, kinder parents, and in doing so wind their way through other Grimm tales and have dangerous adventures such as plucking three golden hairs from the devil's head in order to escape from Hell, defeating a charming but evil wizard who eats little girls' souls, and saving their kingdom from a mysterious dragon. The story is told playfully by an enthusiastic narrator who tells the audience that fairy tales were often originally gruesome and exciting but have become boring as a result of censoring and sugar-coating, and the narrator's telling is humorous as well as gory and scary, sometimes simultaneously. Ultimately, this smart retelling is a story about forgiveness, and Hansel and Gretel are ultimately able to forgive their parents and love them despite their shortcomings. This is an engaging and clever novel that will be enjoyed by all children and parents who have always loved fairy tales as well as many children and parents who have never really enjoyed fairy tales before but are looking for a compelling and slightly scary read. Reviewer: Jeannine Stickle
Kirkus Reviews
Fairy tales for the horror set blend themselves into one intact thread that's satisfying enough to overcome an intrusive narrator. The storyteller's voice (presented in bold type) opens by asserting that original Grimm tales are "awesome," "violent and ... bloody," while "all the versions of the stories you've heard [are]... mind-numbingly boring" due to sanitization. It's an odd premise for a piece whose audience is surely aware of many fractured fairy tales that are dark and/or awesome. The narrator contributes unnecessary platitudes, but on the plus side, savvily warns when little kids should leave the room, effectively cautioning big kids that upcoming content is sad or gory—and it really is. Heads are lopped off, blood flows, men reach down girls' throats and pull out their souls. Old Grimm tales and Gidwitz's original additions weave together into one arc, with fiercely loyal siblings Hansel and Gretel at the heart. The narrator's presence lessens; action and emotion deepen; funny gross-outs pop up amid serious violence; and everything builds to one painful and triumphant catharsis. (Fractured fairy tale. 10-13)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142419670
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
08/18/2011
Series:
Grimm Series, #1
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
63,130
Product dimensions:
4.90(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.76(d)
Lexile:
690L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

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What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Accolades for A Tale Dark & Grimm:
New York Times bestseller
• Selection on the Today Show’s Al’s Book Club for Kids
• NCTE Notable Children’s Books in the Language Arts Selection
• An E. B. White Read Aloud Honor Book
New York Times Editors’ Choice pick
Publishers Weekly Flying Start
School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
• ALA Notable Book
 
“Unlike any children’s book I’ve ever read . . . [it] holds up to multiple re-readings, like the classic I think it will turn out to be.”—New York Times Book Review
“A marvelous reworking of old stories that manages to be fresh, frightening, funny, and humane.”—Wall Street Journal

Accolades for In a Glass Grimmly:
New York Times bestseller
• A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2012
• A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2012
• A School Librry Journal Best Book of 2012
 
 “Gidwitz is back with a second book that, if possible, outshines A Tale Dark & Grimm.”—School Library Journal, starred review
 
 “Compulsively readable.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review
 
“Gory, hilarious, touching, and lyrical all at once, with tons of kid appeal.”—The Horn Book
 
“Adam Gidwitz leads us into creepy forests, gruesome deeds, terrible monsters, and—far worse—the dark places of the human heart. It’s horrible . . . and I LOVED it!”—Tom Angleberger, author of The Strange Case of Origami

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Meet the Author


Adam Gidwitz is an elementary school teacher and storyteller who lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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A Tale Dark and Grimm 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 280 reviews.
BesterReaderEver7 More than 1 year ago
Have you ever wondered what Hansel and Gretel were like before and after the Candy House? You probably haven't- but it's a good start to a review... The point is, this story goes beyond "happily ever after" and before "once upon a time". There is a little blood in this outstanding and creative version of Hansel and Gretel. Gidwitz adds a little humor with his side comments that he adds, and I really like the way it's written. I recommend this to everyone. Okay, maybe not everyone. Kids should not read this, or they might get the idea that if you cut your finger off, you can use it as a key. And that once you get you're head cut off, it's highly possible for it to get reattached. Love this book so much and think Adam should do this with other fairy tales.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the best book ever! It is bloody and funny. I recommend. This is no ordinary fairytale. It is for all ages to enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I have to be honest when i picked it up to read i didnt think it would be good but the book surprised me. I absolutley loved it. I recomend it to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is so exsiting it makes me think what is around the corner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If your lookin for a funny, scarry, and something not for your younger sister than you've come to the right book :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Best book ever! The author is so DETAILED! the story is so WONDERFUL! a must read! And think about it! I am only eleven and I did not get grossed out when hansel cut off his fathers head!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the best book ive read in a while. I dont tyically read fairy tales, but this is just plain great!! Read it!
romanahasim More than 1 year ago
A Tale Dark and Grimm is about a girl name Gretel and a boy name Hansel who runs away from thier home into the wild. While they are in the wild all by thier selves they meet strange people such as a witch, a father who turns his kids into birds, and many more. I think that this is a really good book because its very interesting.
laurel Musto More than 1 year ago
If you like bloody adventres you will like this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is really good and i think u people should read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing! Creepy and hilarious! Definitely a must-read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I absolutely love this book. It is really not like hansel and gretel but it is so good! It can be a little describtive but thats what makes it good! Starting from the beginning people are dieing and heads are getting chopped off! But its ok all the good people come back to life.... i think..... i have to finish my last few pgs! You should read it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Do not read this book late at night !
MissPrincetonandRayRay More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing. Even if I am a young girl who is scared if everything this book shows me that even if you are young you could be brave. I love the fact that he also put what he thinks and he gets readers eye. I finish this in two days and it was my birthday I read this. Everyone could read this. I still cant get over my fear of anything just like Gretel that super brave girl. No wonder they don't want us to know the real stories about these fairytales.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IT WAS THE BEST BOOK IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD!!!!!! I GIVE IT A 100 OUT OF 100
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a great book. It would be a good story to read with your older children or with a class. They are many places for comparing to the other versions of Hansel and Gretel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I give this 5 stars because im from china and this is the first american book i have ever read but i think its distugisting ti younger viewers
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this book. It is very good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is so creapy i cant even finish it all!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing.So much blood. Ending is a shocker
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's a great book. It has some mystery, violence and drama. I would not read this book to little kids. The thing is, the author stops the book and always says if there's littlr kids in the room, get a babysitter or something like that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very very very very very very very very very very very very gory
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
its a really cool book u should get it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it. WARNING: VERY GORY