A Tale Dark and Grimm (Grimm Series #1)

( 264 )

Overview

In this mischievous and utterly original debut, Hansel and Gretel walk out of their own story and into eight other classic Grimm-inspired tales. As readers follow the siblings through a forest brimming with menacing foes, they learn the true story behind (and beyond) the bread crumbs, edible houses, and outwitted witches.

Fairy tales have never been more irreverent or subversive as Hansel and Gretel learn to take charge of their destinies and ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$12.85
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (30) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $8.00   
  • Used (18) from $1.99   
A Tale Dark and Grimm (Grimm Series #1)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

In this mischievous and utterly original debut, Hansel and Gretel walk out of their own story and into eight other classic Grimm-inspired tales. As readers follow the siblings through a forest brimming with menacing foes, they learn the true story behind (and beyond) the bread crumbs, edible houses, and outwitted witches.

Fairy tales have never been more irreverent or subversive as Hansel and Gretel learn to take charge of their destinies and become the clever architects of their own happily ever after.

Read More Show Less
  • A Tale Dark and Grimm
    A Tale Dark and Grimm  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Brooklyn schoolteacher Adam Gidwitz offers imaginative new slants on children's classics in this new collection inspired by nine Grimm Brothers fairy tales. Never before have Hansel and Gretel had an adventure like this!

Publishers Weekly
Hansel and Gretel actually had their heads chopped off. Who knew? If that statement sends you scrambling for your favorite search engine, Gidwitz is savoring that reaction. And for readers who shriek with bloodthirsty delight, not skepticism, he has much more in store. Fracturing the folk tales of the Brothers Grimm, Gidwitz brings together old and new traditions of matter-of-fact horror. Hansel and Gretel become recurring characters in reworked versions of the Grimms' lesser-known tales, such as "Faithful Johannes" and "The Seven Ravens" (here, "The Seven Swallows"). The children are seeking a "nice" family after their father, no woodcutter but a king, pulls the aforementioned beheading stunt ("hey believed firmly in their little hearts that parents should not kill their children"). The perfect family proves elusive, and the children must extricate themselves from one outrageous situation after another--including, yes, a hungry old woman in an edible house. The rhythms and rhetoric of the prose are heavily influenced by verbal storytelling, which can on occasion strike a false note, but mostly add the intended wry wink to an audacious debut that's wicked smart and wicked funny. Ages 10–up. (Nov.)
Children's Literature - Jeannine Stickle
Hansel and Gretel serve as the connecting thread that runs through Gidwitz's enthusiastic and gory retelling of six Grimm fairy tales. The story begins with Hansel and Gretel as they are betrayed by their parents, who are a king and queen in this retelling. The brother and sister decide to run away on a quest to find better, kinder parents, and in doing so wind their way through other Grimm tales and have dangerous adventures such as plucking three golden hairs from the devil's head in order to escape from Hell, defeating a charming but evil wizard who eats little girls' souls, and saving their kingdom from a mysterious dragon. The story is told playfully by an enthusiastic narrator who tells the audience that fairy tales were often originally gruesome and exciting but have become boring as a result of censoring and sugar-coating, and the narrator's telling is humorous as well as gory and scary, sometimes simultaneously. Ultimately, this smart retelling is a story about forgiveness, and Hansel and Gretel are ultimately able to forgive their parents and love them despite their shortcomings. This is an engaging and clever novel that will be enjoyed by all children and parents who have always loved fairy tales as well as many children and parents who have never really enjoyed fairy tales before but are looking for a compelling and slightly scary read. Reviewer: Jeannine Stickle
Kirkus Reviews
Fairy tales for the horror set blend themselves into one intact thread that's satisfying enough to overcome an intrusive narrator. The storyteller's voice (presented in bold type) opens by asserting that original Grimm tales are "awesome," "violent and ... bloody," while "all the versions of the stories you've heard [are]... mind-numbingly boring" due to sanitization. It's an odd premise for a piece whose audience is surely aware of many fractured fairy tales that are dark and/or awesome. The narrator contributes unnecessary platitudes, but on the plus side, savvily warns when little kids should leave the room, effectively cautioning big kids that upcoming content is sad or gory—and it really is. Heads are lopped off, blood flows, men reach down girls' throats and pull out their souls. Old Grimm tales and Gidwitz's original additions weave together into one arc, with fiercely loyal siblings Hansel and Gretel at the heart. The narrator's presence lessens; action and emotion deepen; funny gross-outs pop up amid serious violence; and everything builds to one painful and triumphant catharsis. (Fractured fairy tale. 10-13)
Marjorie Ingall
…unlike any children's book I've ever read…Heavy. And yet…really, really funny…The tone ricochets between lyrical and goofy…And it all works. As the story progresses, it gets less and less faithful to the source material and becomes its own increasingly rich and strange thing…My 8-year-old daughter, a tough critic who doesn't like scary books, read A Tale Dark & Grimm three times, back to back. She was enchanted, not terrified. And no wonder. A Tale Dark & Grimm holds up to multiple rereadings, like the classic I think it will turn out to be.
—The New York Times
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—The Grimm folk and fairy tales have never been for the fainthearted, and neither is Adam Gidwitz's novel (Dutton, 2010). Traditional folktales collected by the Brothers Grimm have been recast with Hansel and Gretel providing the connection between them. The account for which the siblings are best known (the one with less than caring parents and a house made of sweets inhabited by a child-eating adult) is recognizable as are nuggets of other familiar tales, but each has been reinvented with a particular, sometimes peculiar twist. The stories come to life through the unique voice and fine pacing of Johnny Heller. He assumes various accents for different characters, and as narrator, inserts himself to warn listeners when a part gets really dreadful. Chapters end with cliffhangers (of sorts), sure to please those who enjoy grisly tales, gruesome events, and righteousness rewarded.—Maria Salvadore, formerly Washington DC Public Library
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—The Grimm folk and fairy tales have never been for the fainthearted, and neither is Adam Gidwitz's novel (Dutton, 2010). Traditional folktales collected by the Brothers Grimm have been recast with Hansel and Gretel providing the connection between them. The account for which the siblings are best known (the one with less than caring parents and a house made of sweets inhabited by a child-eating adult) is recognizable as are nuggets of other familiar tales, but each has been reinvented with a particular, sometimes peculiar twist. The stories come to life through the unique voice and fine pacing of Johnny Heller. He assumes various accents for different characters, and as narrator, inserts himself to warn listeners when a part gets really dreadful. Chapters end with cliffhangers (of sorts), sure to please those who enjoy grisly tales, gruesome events, and righteousness rewarded.—Maria Salvadore, formerly Washington DC Public Library
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780525423348
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/28/2010
  • Series: Grimm Series , #1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 219,425
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 690L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.92 (w) x 11.80 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Meet the Author

Adam Gidwitz

Adam Gidwitz is an elementary school teacher and storyteller who lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 264 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(207)

4 Star

(33)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 264 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 4, 2011

    Awesome Book- A little bloody

    Have you ever wondered what Hansel and Gretel were like before and after the Candy House? You probably haven't- but it's a good start to a review... The point is, this story goes beyond "happily ever after" and before "once upon a time".
    There is a little blood in this outstanding and creative version of Hansel and Gretel. Gidwitz adds a little humor with his side comments that he adds, and I really like the way it's written. I recommend this to everyone. Okay, maybe not everyone. Kids should not read this, or they might get the idea that if you cut your finger off, you can use it as a key. And that once you get you're head cut off, it's highly possible for it to get reattached.
    Love this book so much and think Adam should do this with other fairy tales.

    43 out of 46 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Anonymous

    This is the best book ever! It is bloody and funny. I recommend. This is no ordinary fairytale. It is for all ages to enjoy.

    30 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    unknown

    I loved this book. I have to be honest when i picked it up to read i didnt think it would be good but the book surprised me. I absolutley loved it. I recomend it to anyone.

    24 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Love the book

    It is so exsiting it makes me think what is around the corner

    19 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 2, 2011

    A tale of a dark grimm.

    If you like bloody adventres you will like this.

    17 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2012

    Woah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Best book ever! The author is so DETAILED! the story is so WONDERFUL! a must read! And think about it! I am only eleven and I did not get grossed out when hansel cut off his fathers head!

    15 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2011

    Love it!!"

    If your lookin for a funny, scarry, and something not for your younger sister than you've come to the right book :)

    15 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    Pretty good

    Do not read this book late at night !

    15 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2011

    Awesome

    It is really good and i think u people should read it.

    12 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    Read. The. Book.

    This is the best book ive read in a while. I dont tyically read fairy tales, but this is just plain great!! Read it!

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 18, 2011

    What it's about

    A Tale Dark and Grimm is about a girl name Gretel and a boy name Hansel who runs away from thier home into the wild. While they are in the wild all by thier selves they meet strange people such as a witch, a father who turns his kids into birds, and many more. I think that this is a really good book because its very interesting.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Wow

    I absolutely love this book. It is really not like hansel and gretel but it is so good! It can be a little describtive but thats what makes it good! Starting from the beginning people are dieing and heads are getting chopped off! But its ok all the good people come back to life.... i think..... i have to finish my last few pgs! You should read it!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012

    A nice story

    This book is a good one. I would recomend 2 10+. Volint

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2011

    A tale dark and grimm

    Gory in some parts but mostly the narrative is anoying with all those'the end, wait no, not reallys' and the 'gosh its just to bloody, hire a baby ditter already' parts.

    3 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 11, 2011

    Bloody Book

    This book is amazing. Even if I am a young girl who is scared if everything this book shows me that even if you are young you could be brave. I love the fact that he also put what he thinks and he gets readers eye. I finish this in two days and it was my birthday I read this. Everyone could read this. I still cant get over my fear of anything just like Gretel that super brave girl. No wonder they don't want us to know the real stories about these fairytales.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2013

    Omg

    I loved it

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2013

    A tale DARK and GRIMM*

    Soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo dark and grimm

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    IT Was very interesting

    IT WAS THE BEST BOOK IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD!!!!!!

    I GIVE IT A 100 OUT OF 100

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2013

    I think it will be stupid haha

    Stupid

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2013

    Daughter of Charm Part 13

    Hey. Okay the the retard that said my story sucks. I for one like my story. I dont freakin give a crap if you don't like my story just deal with your life. On a happier note, I am halway through exams! Yay! On with the story pipples!- I throw on a Camp Half Blood tee, some skinny jeans, and pull my hair back into a ponytail. I sling my quiver and backpack over my shoulder and run updeck to see that we've landed on a tropical beach. "Well, we're in the Bahamas. Noah's been steering all night, so I told him to go rest." Lucas says to me as I come to the railing. Racer walks updeck with Travis in tow. "Hey, sleep well?" I nod and stuff a swimsuit in my backpack in case we finish early. "We should send a small group to go and find the help that Sophie's dad told us about." I say once the crew (except Noah) is on-deck. Lucy begins immeadiatly. "I say Kristen, Sophie, Lucas, and me. The rest of you guys should enjoy the day and watch the ship. I think Lucas deserves the land." We say goodbye to everyone and go off the ship. I take out the silver spheres and put one underneath each fingernail. The small poke lets me know that they're in correctly. I flick my fingers to make sure and ten tiny poison needles pop out automatically. We continue to walk on until Sophie leads us to a hotel. "This is where he told us to go." She tells us. We go in and see a silver and white room. A man walks out of a door to the lobby. The rest of the place is deserted. The man has dark hair and gray eyes. He is handsome in a strict way. "Welcome to the hotel. Will you be staying with us?" He says coolly. "Um, us?" Lucas answers back, confused. "My invisible servants. Will you be staying? I forgot to introduce myself. I am Aeolus. This is my human form. My bull form was destroyed." I' ve heard that name before. Where have I heard it before? He looks at me. "And who are you, my dear? A daughter of Aphrodite. How...sweet. I was once betrothed to a daughter of Aphrodite." He gets a faraway look in his eyes but shakes it off His voice is enchanting and smooth, but a bit longing like a river. A RIVER!! He is Aeolus, the river god who was engaged to Deinara, Hercules' wife. Lucy steps forward. "Look, we just want some information for our quest. If you'd give it to us, we'd get out of your crappy hotel as soon as possible." Aeolus becomes enraged and wills the fountain to encase Lucas, Sophie, and Lucy. I can see Sophie strain with effort to try and move the water, but Aeolus is too strong. He turns to me. "You, Daughter of Aphrodite, you will make up for my loss of the beautiful Deinara and the strong Piper. You will become my wife and rule the rivers by my side for all eternity. You will become eternal, a goddess. And I will let your friends go free after we are husband and wife. So whaddaya say?" I feel a plan forming in my head, as Aeolus grins in suspense. "I accept, but only if my friends are in the service." Aeolus agrees and lets my friends go. "We shall be married at dusk. Your dress will arrive shortly. Here is the key to your suite. Until then, my bride." Next part at In A Glass Grimmly!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 264 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)