A Tale of Two Cities / Edition 1

A Tale of Two Cities / Edition 1

3.8 754
by Charles Dickens, Tricia Hedge
     
 

ISBN-10: 0194230473

ISBN-13: 9780194230476

Pub. Date: 01/28/2004

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

When the starving French masses rise in hate to overthrow a corrupt and decadent government, both the guilty and innocent become victims of their frenzied anger. Soon nothing stands in the way of the chilling figure they enlist for their cause—La Guillotine—the new invention for efficiently chopping off heads.

Charles Dickens' compelling portrait…  See more details below

Overview

When the starving French masses rise in hate to overthrow a corrupt and decadent government, both the guilty and innocent become victims of their frenzied anger. Soon nothing stands in the way of the chilling figure they enlist for their cause—La Guillotine—the new invention for efficiently chopping off heads.

Charles Dickens' compelling portrait of the results of terror and treason, love and supreme sacrifice continues to captivate readers around the world. With Frank Muller's brilliant performance, unforgettable characters—the ever-knitting Madame Defarge, the lovely Lucie Manette, her broken father, the honorable Charles Darnay, and the sometimes scurrilous Sydney Carton—burst from the pages, full of life and passion.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780194230476
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
01/28/2004
Series:
Oxford Bookworms Series
Edition description:
ABR
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 4.90(h) x 0.30(d)

Table of Contents

Insights into Charles Dickens
Book 1Recalled to Life
Chapter 1The Period16
Chapter 2The Mail20
Chapter 3The Night Shadows (Summary)27
Chapter 4The Preparation28
Chapter 5The Wine-Shop41
Chapter 6The Shoemaker53
Book 2The Golden Thread
Chapter 1Five Years Later (Summary)67
Chapter 2A Sight69
Chapter 3A Disappointment77
Chapter 4Congratulatory (Summary)92
Chapter 5The Jackal94
Chapter 6Hundreds of People (Summary)101
Chapter 7Monseigneur in Town (Summary)103
Chapter 8Monseigneur in the Country (Summary)104
Chapter 9The Gorgon's Head105
Chapter 10Two Promises119
Chapter 11A Companion Picture (Summary)127
Chapter 12The Fellow of Delicacy (Summary)128
Chapter 13The Fellow of No Delicacy129
Chapter 14The Honest Tradesman134
Chapter 15Knitting145
Chapter 16Still Knitting157
Chapter 17One Night (Summary)169
Chapter 18Nine Days170
Chapter 19An Opinion177
Chapter 20A Plea (Summary)185
Chapter 21Echoing Footsteps186
Chapter 22The Sea Still Rises199
Chapter 23Fire Rises (Summary)205
Chapter 24Drawn to the Loadstone Rock207
Book 3The Track of A Storm
Chapter 1In Secret221
Chapter 2The Grindstone (Summary)234
Chapter 3The Shadow236
Chapter 4Calm in Storm (Summary)242
Chapter 5The Wood-Sawyer (Summary)244
Chapter 6Triumph246
Chapter 7A Knock at the Door (Summary)254
Chapter 8A Hand at Cards255
Chapter 9The Game Made268
Chapter 10The Substance of the Shadow283
Chapter 11Dusk (Summary)298
Chapter 12Darkness299
Chapter 13Fifty-Two308
Chapter 14The Knitting Done321
Chapter 15The Footsteps Die Out Forever334

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A Tale of Two Cities: Heinle Reading Library 3.8 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 754 reviews.
Gulliver_cc More than 1 year ago
You get what you pay for! This is a very crude version of the text, straight from a scan via OCR with no proofreading whatsoever. Spend the few bucks to get a version of this great book that you can actually read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellently done!
Weil Sau Sau More than 1 year ago
The Tale of Two Cities is a very good book about the 1700's. The author uses fake characters to describe the life abd times there. This is an excellent book for those who want history but a little fun too. All in all, I would recommend this book.
Eponine23 More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite book of all time, I absolutely loved it from beginning to end. It made me cry and laugh out loud in class--even though I was supposed to be watching a movie or doing an assignment and got in trouble for reading. The plot was amazing, the characters were captivating and the narrative was entertaining. I love strong female characters and Madame Defarge was simply brilliant. But as awesome as she was, Sydney Carton was my favorite. Those last few chapters, I could not stop crying. My only complaint about this book is that there should have been more about him.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books I have ever read. The Penguin Classics edition offers detailed end-notes, as always. The only complaint I have with this edition, though, is that some of the end-notes revealed a bit of the plot. The story was not completely ruined, so it is not really a big deal. Overall, an excellent book.
KTW More than 1 year ago
Glad i finally grew up and started reading
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Harvard College Library copy, scanned as part of the Google project, has OCR text recognition issues. This is a fair copy of a great work, flawed by the OCR flaws. Wish Google had taken the time to edit it correctly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There are too many spelling errors in this book to even get past the 1st page, its not worth the space on your nook
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am sure that a tale of two cities is a great book, but this version only has the first 48 pages! If you are the person who put this up, quit trying to make people pay their money for something unfinished and dumb. Fix this book or take it back. I want a refund.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first part was a little slow, but in the end, it was fabulous! A wonderful read, well written, perfect! A book defidently worth reading!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is extremely good BUT this is mainly for people who love literature. Once you get interested in this book and get passed the first few chapters you will want to read this over and over again to see what you missed. I hope if you buy this you are dedicated because it will hook you. Enjoy!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is my first novel on CD and I have been thoroughly enjoying the experience. Of course, it helps that it is also my first Dickens novel. Every character comes to life in the descriptions and every scene is painted in my mind's eye as Dickens unfolds the story. The narator also does a wonderful job. Fantastic!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”- Dickens’ opening has become one of the most popular throughout literature. Charles  Dickens usual writing style of humor is absent as he turns to the somber subject of the French Revolution. His historical context of the novel encompasses the themes of love, loss, secrets, sacrifice, resurrection, vengeance, and the darkness of the people that suffered through the oppression that evolved into the French Revolution. Dickens keeps his audience enchanted and coming back for the next book in the novel by enticing them with a captivating story-line, complex characters, complimentary and contrasting aspects within the characters and the setting, and brilliant descriptions that create a powerful mood and an array of tones. He weaves symbolism, imagery, and understatements into his text to make it beautifully rich, especially for a careful reader.  One of Dickens’ main themes of the book, as seen in the opening, is contractions. Within this theme, Dickens uses several other themes to show the difference between characters and to enhance the relationships between those characters. For example, though they may look very similar, Charles Darnay is the“good guy” and Sydney Carton is the contraction to all that is good in Charles Darnay. He is the sinner-savior archetype, making him the ultimate savior of the story, yet Charles Darnay steals Lucie Manette from him. However, Dickens comparisons also expand to the settings in the book, such as, the utopian society, i.e. England, and the dystopian society, i.e. France. Dickens then ties all these comparisons and similarities together in a nice bow by connecting the past with the present and  showing how these ties affect the future of the characters and those that are to come. The change produced within the characters and the storyline all come to a climax as the events that he had been foreshadowing take place and change the lives of each character.  Another one of Dickens’ themes is that of darkness. Madame Defarge embodies everything that is darkness: deceit, secrets, and death. Her plans and memories fester within the darkness of the French Revolution, coming to a climax when she has Charles Darnay in her clutches and the guillotine waiting for her instructions. The ominous echo of the guillotine can be heard throughout Paris, but in the darkness, there is a light, a glimmer of hope. Lucie encompasses that light, spreading goodness everywhere she goes. She frees her father from his bondages, makes Charles Darnay a better man, and saves Sydney Carton from himself. However, the setting also looks at this hope. The scenery and lighting of England is optimistic and a safe haven to escape to, yet when you get across the sea to France, doom and gloom encloses around you, and all hope is lost. These complex compliments and contractions of each other have made his images and characterizations so well known.  Dickens uses several literary styles, including satirical, realistic, gothic, and naturalistic to encompass the different themes, characterizations, and settings presented in the book. Along with those previously stated, he also uses Biblical motifs to describe his characters and settings. For example, when describing the French government, he uses Biblical ideas from the Old Testament, such as, judgment, guilt, condemnation, punishment for wrongdoings, and blood sacrifices to cover the sins of those that had oppressed them. Yet, when he described the English government, he used New Testament ideas like grace, forgiveness, compassion, enlightened, and saying that it is at a state of restoration. Dickens also went on to categorize certain characters into either Old or New Testament. Charles Darnay, for example was described by his sins and being guilty, like in the Old Testament, whereas Lucie Manette and her father were described as graceful and compassionate, like several New Testament ideals. An interesting occurrence happens however, when the characters and settings begin changing and the life for one character becomes clearer and more purposeful, switching from Old Testament to New Testament. For that man, “‘It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known’” (Dickens 358). 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This classic is deserving of the status. I would suggest reading along with notes, as the language can be a bit difficult to follow. I will read this again. Amazing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Should read very good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Plesse rescan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Waasn't really the best or the worst thing that i have ever read, but it gets kinda boring and you lose track of what is really going on, however some people could really like the direction the book takes, but i personally was not a fan of it
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book does not really have a good plot and its action and suspense is outdated when compared with some of the books that we have now. The main reason that this books gets any stars at all is because of the mad skill that Dickens has with writing. The depth of the symbolism was one of the few things that anstonished me in this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I know I'm going against the grain on this one, but I hate this book more than words can express. Now, don't think I'm saying this without some support, giving a classic novel like this one star is not very popular. I just can't bring myself to enjoy reading anything by Charles Dickens. This may not mean much from someone who likes to read Camus, Salinger, and Kesey like myself, but I just don't know how people can get into Dickens' novels, especially this one. I was unfortunately assigned to read this book twice in high school and have read it a total of three times (I read it in eighth grade for leisure). I really regret wasting the time and energy. There is not one character in this book that I can really care for, which is a big turn off for me. And Lucie...ugh! I never thought an author could make one of his characters over act in a book. Well, Dickens pulled it off. I love reading and I can find enjoyment in almost every piece of literature I can get my hands on. Except, of course, for a waste of print like this.
Anonymous 14 days ago
I wont be on for while may a week. Love ya!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book, with its hard vocabulary, wordy writing, and plainly hard to understand for many is a piece of pure literature. Was very confused in the beginning...literally had no idea of the storyline... As you delve deeper into the novel (maybe google a few things you dont understand, look on wikipedia, etc), the book gets very interesting. So dont judge a book by its cover, and read Tale of Two Cities, a truly wonderful masterpiece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I mean, my mom is into reading this kind of books but none of them are for kids. The vocab is really hard to get and its realyy boring for chirdren under 13. My advice... dont read it unless you are really old!!!