Tales from the Morgue: Forensic Answers to Nine Famous Cases by Cyril H. Wecht, Mark Curriden |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Tales from the Morgue: Forensic Answers to Nine Famous Cases

Tales from the Morgue: Forensic Answers to Nine Famous Cases

3.6 3
by Cyril H. Wecht, Mark Curriden
     
 

Was Scott Peterson convicted of murdering Laci Peterson based upon circumstantial evidence alone? Did Washington intern Chandra Levy know her killer? In "Tales from the Morgue", Dr Cyril Wecht, one of the most sought-after forensic pathologists in the world, shares his insights and scientific expertise on nine cases that he has officially investigated -

Overview

Was Scott Peterson convicted of murdering Laci Peterson based upon circumstantial evidence alone? Did Washington intern Chandra Levy know her killer? In "Tales from the Morgue", Dr Cyril Wecht, one of the most sought-after forensic pathologists in the world, shares his insights and scientific expertise on nine cases that he has officially investigated - high-profile cases as well as other lesser-known but highly intriguing mysteries. Dr Wecht takes the reader inside some of the nation's most bizarre and intriguing medico-legal investigations and shows how forensic scientists help to solve crimes - and why they sometimes fail in their efforts. His vast experience and his willingness to take on the establishment if necessary and provide proof that runs counter to popular opinion make this book a page-turner.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Adult/High School-Young people drawn to the broad fields of criminal justice, medicine, or science will be fascinated by the forensic findings presented here. The thought-provoking cases span 40 years of renowned pathologist Wecht's career and are arranged chronologically from most recent (2002) to oldest (1962). They were also selected to uphold or refute the legal-medical decisions made by other professionals. The subjects include John F. Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, Chandra Levy, Scott Peterson, and the airliner crash in Gander, Newfoundland. Context provided for each scenario is intertwined with detailed forensic evidence. The conclusions may or may not agree with popular judgments. In three instances, strong arguments are made that subterfuge was used to mask critical forensic evidence, and Wecht challenges authorities to reopen the cases. Readers may view Tales as another collection of his memoirs. Like Grave Secrets (Penguin, 1996) and Mortal Evidence (Prometheus, 2004), this chatty yet analytical book is written to appeal to laypersons, and it does. Its whodunit aspect is magnetic.-Claudia C. Holland, Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781591023531
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
10/28/2005
Pages:
300
Sales rank:
1,064,856
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.90(d)

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Tales from the Morgue: Forensic Answers to Nine Famous Cases 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book was great, I couldn't put it down. I really enjoyed the chapter on The Scott Peterson Case. It included alot of missing facts that was not shown on the news or in the papers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had not expected to agree with everything presented in this book, but I did expect scientific facts, not pages of personal opinion regarding the people he represented when he was testifying for the defense in a case. The Jayson Williams chapter was just a bit too much. Just a few to many pages on what a great guy Mr. Williams is and not enough on the fact that he had killed someone. In one chapter Dr. Wecht mentions leaving psychological evaluation up to others, but here in the Williams chapter a good portion of your reading time is spent on what a great guy Mr. Williams is and how he contributed to his fellow man. I am sorry this book didn't hold up to others I had read on similar topics.