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Tales of a New America
     

Tales of a New America

by Robert B. Reich
 

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The Harvard political economist argues that Americans must rethink some important cultural myths and self-definitions if the U.S. is to retain its dominant role within the emerging global economy.

Overview

The Harvard political economist argues that Americans must rethink some important cultural myths and self-definitions if the U.S. is to retain its dominant role within the emerging global economy.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Japan's resurgent growth and unrest in the Third World signal the end of the United States' preeminent position as a world power. American conservatives bent on a rigid, militarist posture and liberals who preach altruism both have utterly failed to adapt to a changed reality. That is Reich's thesis, developed in chapters examining the corrosion of our cultural myths. While the Horatio Alger parable of ``the little guy who makes good'' is losing its inspirational hold in an economy of scarcity, America's fear and aggressiveness toward ``them out there''be they Russians or Latinosseem to be intensifying. Reich ( The Next American Frontier urges cooperation among political factions as our only hope. He sounds like a conservative when he attacks government regulation, like a liberal when he argues that we should view welfare as public investment in our future. His contention that both the arms race with the Soviets and the trading race with Japan are sapping our economy is well worth considering. (March 26)
Library Journal
( The Next American Frontier ) proposes that America's political culture has been uniquely expressed in four parablesthe Mob at the Gates, the Triumphant Individual, the Benevolent Community, and the Rot at the Top. Both conservative and liberal interpretations of these tales divide people into ``us'' and ``them.'' While the conservatives seek to impose discipline on ``them'' (e.g., the Soviet Union, Third World nations, Japan, poor people), liberals seek to conciliate ``them.'' Reich urges, instead, expansion of the category of ``us'' through collective efforts involving reciprocal gain, obligation, and trust (e.g., efforts to increase the wealth of both developing nations and American workers). He sees a mythology embracing an expanded ``us'' and interdependence evolving, for implementation by new leadership. Recommended for academic and large public libraries. David Steiniche, Social Sciences Dept., Missouri Western State Coll., St. Joseph

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307830623
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/10/2013
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
422,387
File size:
2 MB

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