Tales of the Weirrd

Overview

Genuine weirdness is a rare quality. To be truly weird demands character and wanton disregard for the social mores of the day.

Unleashed in Tales of the Weirrd is Ralph Steadman's fantastic interpretations and biographies of nineteenth century grotesques, oddities, imposters and eccentrics. The book is a hilarious catalog of nature's freakish humor and, in the best Victorian tradition, it instructs as well as entertains. This crazy collection ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $3.78   
  • New (1) from $60.46   
  • Used (17) from $3.78   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$60.46
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(171)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2002 Paperback Brand New Paperback, clean, tight, unmarked, no spine or cover creases() Genuine weirdness is a rare quality. To be truly weird demands character and wanton ... disregard for the social mores of the day. Unleashed in Tales of the Weirrd is Ralph Steadman's fantastic interpretations and biographies of nineteenth century grotesques, oddities, imposters and eccentrics. The book is a hilarious catalog of nature's freakish humor and, in the best Victorian tradition, it instructs as well as entertains. T. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Niagara Falls, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Genuine weirdness is a rare quality. To be truly weird demands character and wanton disregard for the social mores of the day.

Unleashed in Tales of the Weirrd is Ralph Steadman's fantastic interpretations and biographies of nineteenth century grotesques, oddities, imposters and eccentrics. The book is a hilarious catalog of nature's freakish humor and, in the best Victorian tradition, it instructs as well as entertains. This crazy collection of dwarfs, and gluttons, wits and water-spouters includes:

  • Charles Charlesworth, who grew a beard at age four and died of old age at the age of seven
  • Old Boots, who could hold a piece of money between his nose and chin
  • Barbara Urselin, the hairy-faced woman
  • Henry Lemoine, an eccentric bookseller
  • Guillaume de Nittis, who tried to eat himself
  • Fakir Agastiya, who kept his arm in the air for ten years
  • Neville Vadio, the blind caricaturist, who was claimed by many to be a better draughtsman than Rembrandt.

Tales of the Weirrd is an extraordinary celebration of the bizarre brought to life by the astonishing energy, imagination and power of Ralph Steadman's pen.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552976449
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/7/2002
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 128
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 10.94 (h) x 0.33 (d)

Meet the Author

Ralph Steadman's illustrations have appearing in newspapers, magazines and dozens of books including Hunter S. Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Animal Farm, Alice in Wonderland and Sigmund Freud. He recently traveled the world's vineyards and distilleries for Oddbins, which culminated in his two prize-winning books, The Grapes of Ralph and Still Life With Bottle. He has an Honorary D. Litt from the University of Kent. He has won numerous awards including the W.H. Smith Illustration Award and was named Illustrator of the Year by the American Institute of Graphic Arts in 1979.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
Francis Battalia, the Stone-Eater
De Hightrehight, John Cummings and Cliquot
John Broughton, a Notorious Pugilist
Bertholde, Prime Minister to Alboinus
Matthew Buchinger, the Little Man of Nuremberg
Miss Whitehead, the Bank Nun
Joseph Clark, the Posture Master
Nathaniel Bentley, the Well-Known 'Dirty Dick'
Lord Rokeby, of Singular Eccentricity
Toby, a Begging Impostor
Foster Powell, the Astonishing Pedestrian
Peter the Wild Boy, of the Woods of Hamelin
Ann Moore, the Fasting Woman
Old Boots, of Ripon in Yorkshire
Floram Marchand, the Great Water-Spouter
Matthew Lovat, Who Crucified Himself
Jane Lewson, an Eccentric Old Lady
Henry Lemoine, an Eccentric Bookseller
Henry Jenkins, the Modern Methuselah
Jacob Hall, the Famous Rope-Dancer
Charles Domery, the Remarkable Glutton
Guillaume de Nittis, Who Tried to Eat Himself
Carl Unthan, the Armless Fiddler
Wybrand Lolkes, the Dutch Dwarf
Eli Bowen and Charles Tripp
St Joseph of Copertino, the flying Friar
Alexis Vincent Charles Berbiguier, the Demon Bottler
Charles
Charlesworth, Who Died Of Old Age at the Age of Seven
Claude Ambroise Seurat, the Living Skeleton
Francis Trovillou, the Horned Man
Baron D'Aguilar, of Starvation Farm
Daniel Lambert, of Surprising Corpulency
Joanna Southcott, an Extraordinary Fanatic
Daniel Cuerton, and his Astonishing Feats
Barbara Urselin, the Hairy-Faced Woman
Even Fleigen, Who Lived on the Smell of Flowers
Elizabeth Woodcock, Who Was Buried in Snow Nearly Eight Days
Thomas Hills Everitt, the Enormous Baby
Joseph Capper, the Enemy of Flies
Thomas Hudson, Remarkable for his
Misfortunes

Deacon François de Pans, of Numerous Austerities
Louise Clement, Born with One Eye
Fakir Agastiya of Bengal, Who kept his Arm in the Air for Ten Years
Joseph Pujol, Le Pétomane
The Wonderful Two-Headed Girl
Miss Atkinson, the Wonderful Pig-Faced Lady
Dulle Griet, a Character in a Bruegel Painting
Henry Constantine Jennings, the Remarkable Virtuoso
Neville Vadio, the Blind Caricaturist

Read More Show Less

Preface

Introduction

Genuine Weirdness is a rare quality. To be truly weird demands character and a wanton disregard for the social mores of the day.

Strangely, it is not in the past century that the truly weird have emerged, even though we have witnessed mind-warping changes and can expect many more in the new millennium. The changes we have witnessed have not come about to make us all different, to help us find ourselves and realize our own identities. On the contrary, it seems that the essence of movement and change in the past century has had more to do with the control of difference, the standardization of mankind to satisfy a universal desire for sameness. Twentieth-century political ideologies have sought only to free us from one tyranny, and impose another more ruthless and more regulated tyranny upon us whose methods raze differences to the ground. The abnormal is treated with a general social disgust, as though human dignity had more to do with "neat front lawns" than the spirit and courage within our troubled minds.

Today, ideologies are structures into which people are systematically packed. Traditionally, ideologies were considered to be ideals fired with reason, rationalizing the best in us, the finest, our greatest hopes and aspirations. The Renaissance kindled the rebirth of Humanism through the arts and philosophic reflection, and stands as an example, a yardstick which still commands respect.

Ideologies of the twentieth century are nineteenth-century social dreams gone wrong, re-structured into practical systems to deny the individual. They have been exposed as euphemisms hiding terrifying crimes — the purging of millions of lives in the name of common goals — lowest common denominators masquerading as brave new worlds, the last refuge of a Utopian sleaze.

Though eccentricity was rife, the Victorians were not without blame in their denial of self and the individual. The respectable, the noble and the regal hid the shame of abnormality behind locked doors in remote rooms, treating such blighted wretches far worse that animals, as though a congenital defect was a curse to be vilified, along with its carrier, and not a human being with feelings to be nurtured and cared for.

Perhaps those who escaped such treatment due to circumstances of birth within a socially inferior section of society were luckier, for the afflicted could be displayed proudly as prized sideshow specimens for which money could be charged, even fortunes made. There was, after all, human contact and in many cases an admiration and sense of awe at the weirdness displayed before a credulous public. Some inbred mutants lived lives of luxury as court favourites, using their charm and their guile to win hearts and be accepted on equal terms, or at least as engaging novelties, which gave them some kind of decent life.

In our time, these physical and mental abnormalities are viewed with an awkward repugnance and an embarrassment, for we can neither display such things for profit, shut them away in towers, nor live comfortably with them side by side in a streamlined society which prizes the ordinary, the conventional and the unobtrusive. We have civilized ourselves to be decent and law-abiding and uncompassionate. We are not caring for the growing numbers of "normal inadequates" who cannot absorb the stresses of our highly developed and bureaucratic lifestyle. What chance for a being who is truly weird? If all mankind were weird maybe the normal would look strange.

In 1969 I happened upon a book published in 1869 by Reeves and Turner, 196 Strand, London. It is a collection of Wonderful Characters written about by Henry Wilson and James Caulfield. For twenty years I have considered it a book to be re-made and the characters portrayed as they might have been. Gradually, the revised collection emerged and recently I finished it and decided to use the same enchanting text which is so steeped in the turn of phrase of mid-Victorian England. I could do no better, but I have included other weird and wonderful characters found elsewhere. I have given my own account of their lives. The subjects are to be found in several books, but in that context more as a collection of sideshow curiosities from the Guinness Book of Records or Ripley's Believe It or Not.

This is a book of characters who inspired drawings I could not have imagined without the proof of their one-time existence.

I resisted including twentieth-century characters. With a few exceptions, people of a genuinely unusual appearance ceased to exist professionally with the passing of silent movies, crowned by Tod Browning's 1933 masterpiece,
Freaks. Today, weirdness is recreated in special-effects workshops tailor-made to suit a film, sometimes ingenious, sometimes pathetic but, weirdly, always in demand.

With the passage of time between us and the truly weird of long ago we can allow a certain fantasy to surround these special beings. Maybe the facts have been changed or embellished with the telling, which is the essence of a good story anyway. We can treat them as fairy tales. It also allows me to view them objectively without remorse, and with candour and sometimes burnout. Look upon my effort as a graphic reincarnation of their kind viewed from a place in history where people have cancelled out the prospect that difference can be cultivated and regarded as a virtue.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

Genuine Weirdness is a rare quality. To be truly weird demands character and a wanton disregard for the social mores of the day.

Strangely, it is not in the past century that the truly weird have emerged, even though we have witnessed mind-warping changes and can expect many more in the new millennium. The changes we have witnessed have not come about to make us all different, to help us find ourselves and realize our own identities. On the contrary, it seems that the essence of movement and change in the past century has had more to do with the control of difference, the standardization of mankind to satisfy a universal desire for sameness. Twentieth-century political ideologies have sought only to free us from one tyranny, and impose another more ruthless and more regulated tyranny upon us whose methods raze differences to the ground. The abnormal is treated with a general social disgust, as though human dignity had more to do with "neat front lawns" than the spirit and courage within our troubled minds.

Today, ideologies are structures into which people are systematically packed. Traditionally, ideologies were considered to be ideals fired with reason, rationalizing the best in us, the finest, our greatest hopes and aspirations. The Renaissance kindled the rebirth of Humanism through the arts and philosophic reflection, and stands as an example, a yardstick which still commands respect.

Ideologies of the twentieth century are nineteenth-century social dreams gone wrong, re-structured into practical systems to deny the individual. They have been exposed as euphemisms hiding terrifying crimes — the purging of millions of lives inthe name of common goals — lowest common denominators masquerading as brave new worlds, the last refuge of a Utopian sleaze.

Though eccentricity was rife, the Victorians were not without blame in their denial of self and the individual. The respectable, the noble and the regal hid the shame of abnormality behind locked doors in remote rooms, treating such blighted wretches far worse that animals, as though a congenital defect was a curse to be vilified, along with its carrier, and not a human being with feelings to be nurtured and cared for.

Perhaps those who escaped such treatment due to circumstances of birth within a socially inferior section of society were luckier, for the afflicted could be displayed proudly as prized sideshow specimens for which money could be charged, even fortunes made. There was, after all, human contact and in many cases an admiration and sense of awe at the weirdness displayed before a credulous public. Some inbred mutants lived lives of luxury as court favourites, using their charm and their guile to win hearts and be accepted on equal terms, or at least as engaging novelties, which gave them some kind of decent life.

In our time, these physical and mental abnormalities are viewed with an awkward repugnance and an embarrassment, for we can neither display such things for profit, shut them away in towers, nor live comfortably with them side by side in a streamlined society which prizes the ordinary, the conventional and the unobtrusive. We have civilized ourselves to be decent and law-abiding and uncompassionate. We are not caring for the growing numbers of "normal inadequates" who cannot absorb the stresses of our highly developed and bureaucratic lifestyle. What chance for a being who is truly weird? If all mankind were weird maybe the normal would look strange.

In 1969 I happened upon a book published in 1869 by Reeves and Turner, 196 Strand, London. It is a collection of Wonderful Characters written about by Henry Wilson and James Caulfield. For twenty years I have considered it a book to be re-made and the characters portrayed as they might have been. Gradually, the revised collection emerged and recently I finished it and decided to use the same enchanting text which is so steeped in the turn of phrase of mid-Victorian England. I could do no better, but I have included other weird and wonderful characters found elsewhere. I have given my own account of their lives. The subjects are to be found in several books, but in that context more as a collection of sideshow curiosities from the Guinness Book of Records or Ripley's Believe It or Not.

This is a book of characters who inspired drawings I could not have imagined without the proof of their one-time existence.

I resisted including twentieth-century characters. With a few exceptions, people of a genuinely unusual appearance ceased to exist professionally with the passing of silent movies, crowned by Tod Browning's 1933 masterpiece, Freaks. Today, weirdness is recreated in special-effects workshops tailor-made to suit a film, sometimes ingenious, sometimes pathetic but, weirdly, always in demand.

With the passage of time between us and the truly weird of long ago we can allow a certain fantasy to surround these special beings. Maybe the facts have been changed or embellished with the telling, which is the essence of a good story anyway. We can treat them as fairy tales. It also allows me to view them objectively without remorse, and with candour and sometimes burnout. Look upon my effort as a graphic reincarnation of their kind viewed from a place in history where people have cancelled out the prospect that difference can be cultivated and regarded as a virtue.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)