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Tales the Wind Told Me

Overview

Tales the Wind Told Me is a collection of short stories in a range of genres that center around LGBT characters and themes. Described as evocative and thought provoking, the stories interweave folk lore and myth into day to day life. A woman must wake her "Sleeping Betty" while another must dance with death.
The stories in this collection are tied together by the events and places the author frequented while writing them. Each story is ...
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Tales the Wind Told Me

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Overview

Tales the Wind Told Me is a collection of short stories in a range of genres that center around LGBT characters and themes. Described as evocative and thought provoking, the stories interweave folk lore and myth into day to day life. A woman must wake her "Sleeping Betty" while another must dance with death.
The stories in this collection are tied together by the events and places the author frequented while writing them. Each story is prefaced by an introduction that discusses the transformations she was undergoing at the time.
Rachel Eliason is perhaps better known for her novel, Run, Clarissa, Run which is also available through amazon.com.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781463755249
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/5/2011
  • Pages: 158
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.34 (d)

Meet the Author

Rachel is a Writer and Transgender woman living in the Midwest. She is perhaps better known for her first novel, Run, Clarissa, Run
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 21, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Something to get excited about!

    Brought to you by OBS reviewer Vicki

    Tales the Wind Told Me is a collection of short stories with the genres ranging from Fantasy, Folklore and Science-Fiction. The majority of the stories included in this collection are LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender) themed or were written with this theme in mind. Eliason’s introduction allows the reader to understand the origin of this collection and the personal growth that the author has gone through to get to the point where these stories can be shared with readers. With this background knowledge of the author it is then easy to understand why the stories with a more specific LGBT focus are, by far, the stand-out pieces in this collection.

    My favorite stories in the collection are:

    Sleeping Betty

    The collection opens with Sleeping Betty, which follows the story of Sherry Pinchform; a country Vet coming to terms with her sexuality, unrequited love and qualms about her own femininity. And while the message is very clear throughout this story it is the addition of the Sleeping Beauty allegory that really allows the reader to understand the true awakening that comes with self-acceptance.

    The Neon Path of Righteousness

    Eliason presents an inspired version of a corporate afterlife. The recently deceased Anne is completing her entry level paperwork and interviews in order to pass through the metaphorical pearly gates.

    “I was,” Anne began and broke off, “that is to say, I thought, well, Saint Peter?”

    “Is in upper management.” The lady replied crisply. “With the kinds of volume we see, it isn’t practical you know? He’s not seen clients for a couple of hundred years.”

    Gemone

    Gemone is the only Science-Fiction story in the collection. Eliason originally wrote the story with a hard science theme in mind, however Gemone’s, almost romanticized, voice grew organically from the tale. While the story still maintains attributes of hard science it is the characters and their arcs that make this story extremely special. Short stories are always challenging because the author has to make the reader feel as though they have read all there is to read and feel satisfied. Gemone is a complete short story, with a realistic and gratifying ending but I cannot help feeling like this story is just too good to be as short as it is. Gemone definitely has the potential to be an amazing full-length novel. The title character, Gemone, is a Magge; an androgynous and asexual alien servant who is assigned to a superior-race Hari man, named Markus, as he is entering university. Gemone’s servitude includes keeping Markus from committing any public indiscretions, thus preventing the family name from being tarnished. After a couple of wild years Markus begins to settle down and rather than follow his father’s dream of entering politics he decides to study genetics. Markus’s research eventually takes him down the controversial route of gender reassignment, or in this case gender assignment for the Magge race. This research eventually threatens to abolish the caste system and cause a brutal civil war. Gemone becomes Markus’s test subject and her eventual realisation of her sexuality, individuality and femininity is truly beautiful.

    Continued at openbooksociety dot com

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