The Talisman

The Talisman

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by Walter Scott
     
 

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The Talisman
Walter Scott, scottish historical novelist, playwright, and poet, popular throughout much of the world in the 19th century (1771-1832)

This ebook presents �The Talisman�, from Walter Scott. A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
-01- ABOUT THIS BOOK
-02- INTRODUCTION

Overview

The Talisman
Walter Scott, scottish historical novelist, playwright, and poet, popular throughout much of the world in the 19th century (1771-1832)

This ebook presents �The Talisman�, from Walter Scott. A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
-01- ABOUT THIS BOOK
-02- INTRODUCTION
-03- APPENDIX TO INTRODUCTION
-04- ELLIS'S SPECIMENS OF EARLY ENGLISH METRICEL ROMANCES
-05- TALES OF THE CRUSADERS
-06- THE TALISMAN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940149604180
Publisher:
The Perfect Library
Publication date:
04/14/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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The Talisman 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
One way to read Sir Walter Scott's historical novels is as if he were Nostradamus writing of the 21st Century. The great Saladin boasts that, as a Kurd, he is descended from the mating of seven demons and beautiful human maidens. Saladin admits to the novel's young hero, the Scottish knight Sir Kenneth, that Mohammed had indeed sowed a better faith (Islam) among the Kurds. But Kurds still respected their pre-Islamic demon ancestors. And he chanted: 'Dark Ahriman, whom Irak (Iraq) still Holds origin of woe and ill! ..... Thine are the waves that lash the rock, Thine the tornado's deadly shock, Where countless navies sink! ..... Each mortal passion's fierce career, Love, hate, ambition, joy, and fear, Thou goadest into sin.' (Chapter III) Saladin and all good Muslims opposing the Christian knights of the Third Crusade respect madmen, for they are close to God. Hence their tolerance of the half-mad Carmelite monk Theodoric of Engaddi, who eggs the Crusaders on to recapture Jerusalem. The novel imaginatively explores the social tensions and jealousies that tear the invading Europeans apart far more than the Muslims defeat them in open battle. Dislike of the English for the Scots is epitomized by Richard the Lion Heart's closest knight, Sir Thomas of Gilsland in Cumberland. He has fought Scots all his life and finds it hard to be minimally courteous even to the bravest of them, such as Sir Kenneth. Templars, French, Austrians and Italians all resent the haughty claims of the bravest of them to be their leader -- King Richard I of England. Much of THE TALISMAN is about their efforts to break his hold on them. Sultan Saladin, disguised as El Hakim (the healer) uses a magic talisman to cure the Lion Heart of a wasting fever. Later he gives the talisman as a wedding present when Sir Kenneth, revealed as the heir apparent Prince David of Scotland, weds the royal cousin, Edith Plantagenet. But before that a silly prank by Richard's recent bride, Berengaria of Spain, tempts Sir Kenneth to desert his post guarding the pennant of England. WIthin a hair of having Kenneth beheaded, Richard relents to the pleas of El Hakim and gives the Scot to the Kurd as a present. Later Saladin blackens Kenneth's skin and sends him back to Richard as a mute slave. The slave, in turn, saves Richard from an assassin and the plot grows ever thicker. The tale abounds in songs: by Blondel the Minstrel and by followers of Saladin. THE TALISMAN climaxes in a knightly challenge at the Diamond of the Desert, an oasis near the Dead Sea. Now reconciled to Richard, the Prince of Scotland stands in for England's most popular king and mortally wounds the traitorous Conrade of Montserrat, to whom the finishing touch is then secretly given by an even more evil co-conspirator, the Master General of the Knights Templar. Saladin finishes off the latter off with his scimitar. An ending as bloody as MACBETH or HAMLET. Another rollicking good yarn by the inventor of the historical novel, Sir Walter Scott. -OOO-
Guest More than 1 year ago
One way to read Sir Walter Scott's historical novels is as if he were Nostradamus writing of the 21st Century. The great Saladin boasts that, as a Kurd, he is descended from the mating of seven demons and beautiful human maidens. Saladin admits to the novel's young hero, the Scottish knight Sir Kenneth, that Mohammed had indeed sowed a better faith (Islam) among the Kurds. But Kurds still respected their pre-Islamic demon ancestors. And he chanted: Dark Ahriman, whom Irak (Iraq) still Holds origin of woe and ill! ..... Thine are the waves that lash the rock, Thine the tornado's deadly shock, Where countless navies sink! ..... Each mortal passion's fierce career, Love, hate, ambition, joy, and fear, Thou goadest into sin.' (Chapter III) *** Saladin and all good Muslims opposing the Christian knights of the Third Crusade respect madmen, for they are close to God. Hence their tolerance of the half-mad Carmelite monk Theodoric of Engaddi, who eggs the Crusaders on to recapture Jerusalem. *** The novel imaginatively explores the social tensions and jealousies that tear the invading Europeans apart far more than the Muslims defeat them in open battle. Dislike of the English for the Scots is epitomized by Richard the Lion Heart's closest knight, Sir Thomas of Gilsland in Cumberland. He has fought Scots all his life and finds it hard to be minimally courteous even to the bravest of them, such as Sir Kenneth. Templars, French, Austrians and Italians all resent the haughty claims of the bravest of them to be their leader -- King Richard I of England. Much of THE TALISMAN is about their efforts to break his hold on them. *** Sultan Saladin, disguised as El Hakim (the healer) uses a magic talisman to cure the Lion Heart of a wasting fever. Later he gives the talisman as a wedding present when Sir Kenneth, revealed as the heir apparent Prince David of Scotland, weds the royal cousin, Edith Plantagenet. *** But before that a silly prank by Richard's recent bride, Berengaria of Spain, tempts Sir Kenneth to desert his post guarding the pennant of England. WIthin a hair of having Kenneth beheaded, Richard relents to the pleas of El Hakim and gives the Scot to the Kurd as a present. Later Saladin blackens Kenneth's skin and sends him back to Richard as a mute slave. The slave, in turn, saves Richard from an assassin and the plot grows ever thicker. *** The tale abounds in songs: by Blondel the Minstrel and by followers of Saladin. THE TALISMAN climaxes in a knightly challenge at the Diamond of the Desert, an oasis near the Dead Sea. Now reconciled to Richard, the Prince of Scotland stands in for England's most popular king and mortally wounds the traitorous Conrade of Montserrat, to whom the finishing touch is then secretly given by an even more evil coconspirator, the Master General of the Knights Templar. Saladin finishes off the latter off with his scimitar. An ending as bloody as MACBETH or HAMLET. Another rollicking good yarn by the inventor of the historical novel, Sir Walter Scott. -OOO-
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful adventure set in the Holy Land of Crusaderfame, a tale of Richard the Lionheart, of his noble knight Sir Kennethof the Leopard (the prince royal of Scotland in disguise) and of the great Saracen ruler Saladin who fought the historical Richard to a stand-still in Palestine and showed his chivalry and nobility in the process. In fact, Scott's tale makes it clear that it is Saladin, not Richard, who is the nobler and wiser chieftain through a series of intrigues which see Saladin playing physician, matchmaker and spy all the while Richard is being gulled by traitors and self-interested allies around him. In fact, the great hearted Richard is moved to condemn to death his greatest knight and supporter, but for the machinations of Saladin and the loyalty of one good dog. This is a fun tale, full of adventure and exotic locales, every bit as strong as Ivanhoe, but, perhaps, just a shade less rich in colorful characters and mayhem. Read it anyway. It's worth it.