Talk About Books!

Talk About Books!

by Elizabeth Knowles, Martha Smith
     
 

Book clubs, literature circles, and reading groups are great ways to promote literacy and books to young readers. This new guide provides everything you need to run a dynamic, no-fuss book discussion group with elementary and middle school students. Featuring 15 titles of diverse genres, it offers discussion topics and activity ideas for some of the best new reads

…  See more details below

Overview

Book clubs, literature circles, and reading groups are great ways to promote literacy and books to young readers. This new guide provides everything you need to run a dynamic, no-fuss book discussion group with elementary and middle school students. Featuring 15 titles of diverse genres, it offers discussion topics and activity ideas for some of the best new reads for kids.

Brought to you by the authors of the highly acclaimed Reading Rules! Motivating Teens to Read, this guide is an outstanding resource for starting and running a stellar literary discussion group—whether it's in a school, public library, or community center. Grades 4-8.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Talk about a great resource! Knowles and Smith effectively pool their experience and insight to create this everything-you-need guide to connecting youth and books. Each of the fifteen chapters focuses on a different book that serves as a prototype for a particular subject or genre. For example, Richard Peck's A Long Way from Chicago (Dial, 1998/VOYA December 1998) introduces historical fiction, humor, and the Great Depression. Each focal book is briefly summarized, followed by a bit of biographical information about its author. Then a list of discussion questions is offered, and it is here that the book really shines. The questions nicely probe both concrete and abstract understanding of the book, as in the Peck chapter that includes the questions: "Do you know anyone who acts like Joey?" and "Why do you think this book won the Newbery award?" In addition, each chapter includes activities for all areas of the curriculum, an annotated list of related books, an annotated list of the author's other works, dozens of Web site suggestions, and the publisher's information. The authors have gathered an interesting assortment of titles. Some are expected books, such as Kate DiCamillo's Because of Winn Dixie (Candlewick, 2000), and some are pleasant surprises, such as Tom Bodett's Williwaw! (Knopf, 1999) and Jan Greenberg's Heart to Heart (Harry N. Abrams, 2001/VOYA August 2001). There is a fabulous Shakespeare chapter, highlighting Michael Rosen's William Shakespeare: His Work and His World (Candlewick, 2001/VOYA October 2002). The related titles are generally quite good, although sometimes they seem more suitable to readers older than the suggested age group. For this reason, this professionalresource could also be effectively used with high school students, particularly disinclined readers who appreciate lighter text. 2003, Greenwood, 150p.; Index. Biblio. Source Notes. Further Reading., $30 pb. Ages 17 to Adult.
—Diane Emge
KLIATT
Knowles, director of staff development at a Boca Raton, FL school and a former elementary school teacher, and Smith, a media specialist at the same school, have teamed up to provide a valuable guide to running book discussion groups with upper elementary and middle school students. They provide discussion topics and activity ideas for 15 recent YA titles in various genres: Night Hoops, by Carl Deuker; Heart to Heart, ed. by Jan Greenberg; Flipped, by Wendelin Van Draanen; A Long Way from Chicago, by Richard Peck; Among the Hidden, by Margaret Peterson Haddix; A Time Apart, by Diane Stanley; Pharaoh's Daughter, by Julius Lester; Rowan of Rin, by Emily Rodda; William Shakespeare, by Michael Rosen; Williwaw!, by Tom Bodett; Skeleton Man, by Joseph Bruchac; Ties That Bind, Ties That Break, by Lensey Namioka; Because of Winn-Dixie, by Kate DiCamillo; Lord of the Deep, by Graham Salisbury; and Monster, by Walter Dean Myers. For each title, there is an introduction, a book summary, information on the author, discussion questions, detailed "content area connections" with suggested activities, and lists of annotated titles about related themes, other titles by the author, teacher resources and Web sites. Web sites about authors and author photos, as well as publisher contact information, are helpfully included. Knowles and Smith even suggest a suitable snack to accompany the discussion of each title! I wish recommended grade levels had been indicated, however; e.g., Monster, which is about a murder trial, is more suitable for 7th grade than for 4th grade. The information on each book issuccinctly expressed and clearly laid out, and while intended to support literature circles this will also be of use to classroom teachers presenting these titles as well as to librarians giving booktalks. An appendix offers a list of annotated professional resources. KLIATT Codes: P-Recommended. 2003, Libraries Unltd., Greenwood, 148p. illus. index., Ages adult.
— Paula Rohrlick

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781591580232
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/05/2000
Pages:
162
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth (Liz) Knowles has served many years as Director of Professional Development and Curriculum at a large private school in south Florida and is currently a freelance writer and curriculum consultant.

Matha Smith received her undergraduate degree in Library Science from Eastern Michigan University and a master's degree of education in Library Science from the University of South Florida. Martha has been a media specialist for over 20 years in the Pre-K through 8th grade setting and is currently serving as Library Media Specialist at Pine Crest School, Boca Raton, Florida.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >