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Talking from 9 to 5: How Women's and Men's Conversational Styles Affect Who Gets Heard, Who Gets Credit, and What Gets Done at Work
     

Talking from 9 to 5: How Women's and Men's Conversational Styles Affect Who Gets Heard, Who Gets Credit, and What Gets Done at Work

4.0 2
by Deborah Tannen, Barbara Caruso (Narrated by)
 

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Are your words working for you?

You say something at a meeting and it is ignored; then when someone else says the same thing, everyone embraces it as a marvelous idea. You devote yourself to a project, but don't get credit for the results. You give what you think are clear instructions, but the job is not done, or done wrong. Sometimes

Overview

Are your words working for you?

You say something at a meeting and it is ignored; then when someone else says the same thing, everyone embraces it as a marvelous idea. You devote yourself to a project, but don't get credit for the results. You give what you think are clear instructions, but the job is not done, or done wrong. Sometimes it seems you are not being heard, not getting credit for your efforts, not getting ahead as fast as you should.

Now, Deborah Tannen brings to the workplace the same voice, eye, and insight that made That's Not What I Meant! and You Just Don't Understand bestselling classics. In Talking From 9 to 5, she explores the special world of work -- where we spend countless hours with people we may not understand or even like, and where the way we talk determines not only how we get the job done, but how we are evaluated for our efforts. Offering powerful new ways of understanding what happens in the workplace, from the simplest exchanges to the complex contemporary issues of the glass ceiling, Tannen explains a variety of conversational styles and reveals how each of us can develop the flexibility and understanding we need.

Since the publication of You Just Don't Understand, Tannen has been told over and over, "Your book saved my marriage." Talking From 9 to 5 will have the same dramatic impact on those who are struggling with co-workers, jobs, and companies, and will help entire companies as well as individual women and men thrive in a working world made up of increasingly diverse workforces and ever-more competitive markets.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This wise and widely informative book fulfills its promise to do for the workplace what Tannen's You Just Don't Understand has done for the home front-heighten the reader's perception of the ways in which gender, power structures and cultural constraints affect communication. Basing her discussion on extensive interviews with workers, managers and executives at a range of businesses, Tannen identifies-and decodes-various conversational ``rituals.'' For example, women tend to use the words ``I'm sorry'' as an ``expression of understanding-and caring''; but men generally interpret ``I'm sorry'' as an acceptance of blame. Tannen demonstrates that women, conditioned in childhood not to sound too self-confident, are likely to issue orders or implement plans indirectly (and therefore don't receive full recognition for their work); men, conditioned not to sound uncertain, may perceive requests for feedback as an admission of weakness. Offering clear explanations of various conversational ``styles,'' Tannen passes few judgments; rather, she offers readers a wider variety of strategies to express themselves. Filled with gracefully analyzed examples of job-related conversations, every page delivers a shock of recognition. Major ad/promo; author tour. (Oct.)
Library Journal
Tannen (You Just Don't Understand, Morrow, 1990) describes differences in men's and women's public communication as found within the business setting. These differences appear to influence actual perceptions of worker skills and abilities. For example, women say "I'm sorry" without actually apologizing and tend to use an indirect manner of speech. These styles make women appear less confident, competent, and professional. However, women who learn to speak like men are accused of being aggressive and unfeminine. Written for the general reader, Tannen's work is entertaining and filled with illustrative conversations. It raises many issues of concern to working women, from knocking against the glass ceiling to dealing with sexual harassment. Unfortunately, Tannen's research has not yet suggested any linguistic solutions. Highly recommended for general public and academic libraries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/15/94.]-Kathy Shimpock-Vieweg, O'Connor Cavanagh Lib., Phoenix

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780788702716
Publisher:
Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date:
01/01/1996
Edition description:
Unabridged

Meet the Author

Deborah Tannen is the author of You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation (a New York Times bestseller for more than four years), That's Not What I Meant!: How Conversational Style Makes or Breaks Relationships and many other books and articles. University Professor and Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown University, she has also been a McGraw Distinguished Lecturer at Princeton University. She has been a frequent guest on such national television shows as The MacNeil/Lehrer News Hour, Good Morning America, Oprah, and Donahue. Articles by and about her have appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, USA Today, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and most other major magazines and newspapers. She and her husband live in Washington, D.C.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Washington, D.C. metro area
Date of Birth:
June 7, 1945
Place of Birth:
Brooklyn, New York
Education:
B.A., Harpur College, 1966, Wayne State University, 1970; M.A. in Linguistics, UC Berkeley, 1976; Ph.D., 1979

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Talking from 9 to 5 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Talking from 9 to 5 truly displays many real-life examples of how men and women differ in a variety of ways, and how being flexible and aware of conversational styles will definitely help realtions with co-workers and life in general at the workplace.