Talking Voices: Repetition, Dialogue, and Imagery in Conversational Discourse / Edition 2

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Overview

Written in readable, vivid, non-technical prose, this book presents the highly respected scholarly research that forms the foundation for Deborah Tannen's best-selling books about the role of language in human relationships. It provides a clear framework for understanding how ordinary conversation works to create meaning and establish relationships. A significant theoretical and methodological contribution to both linguistic and literary analysis, it uses transcripts of tape-recorded conversation to demonstrate that everyday conversation is made of features that are associated with literary discourse: repetition, dialogue, and details that create imagery.

This second edition features a new introduction in which the author shows the relationship between this groundbreaking work and the research that has appeared since its original publication in 1989. In particular, she shows its relevance to the contemporary topic "intertextuality," and provides an invaluable summary of research on that topic.

About the Author:
Deborah Tannen is University Professor and Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown University

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'Pleasant to read and constantly stimulating … an excellent introduction to the kind of analysis T[annen] does so well.' Ronald K. S. Macaulay, Language

' … a very stimulating book, it makes one look with fresh eyes on conversation and what it can tell us about linguistic structures in general.' N. F. Blake, Lore and Language

'Tannen should be applauded for pulling together work on … a host of discourse features. She does so, moreover, in a highly readable form that is surprisingly devoid of jargon.' Charles L. Briggs, American Anthropologist

'Work like Tannen's reminds us how complex conversational interactions are.' Studies in Second Language Acquisition

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521688963
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 11/5/2007
  • Series: Studies in Interactional Sociolinguistics Series , #26
  • Edition description: Revised Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 244
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Deborah Tannen

Deborah Tannen is University Professor and Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown University. She has published twenty books and over 100 articles on such topics as family discourse, spoken and written language, cross-cultural communication, modern Greek discourse, the poetics of everyday conversation, the relationship between conversational and literary discourse, gender and language, workplace interaction, agonism in public discourse, and doctor-patient communication.

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    1. Hometown:
      Washington, D.C. metro area
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 7, 1945
    2. Place of Birth:
      Brooklyn, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A., Harpur College, 1966, Wayne State University, 1970; M.A. in Linguistics, UC Berkeley, 1976; Ph.D., 1979

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     ix
Introduction to first edition     1
Overview of chapters     1
Discourse analysis     5
Introduction to second edition     8
Intertextuality     8
Intertextuality and repetition     10
Intertextuality in interaction: creating identity     12
Intertextuality and power     13
Repetition as intertextuality in discourse     15
Constructed dialogue     17
Repetition and dialogue in interactional discourse     20
Ventriloquizing     21
Involvement in discourse     25
Involvement     25
Sound and sense in discourse     29
Involvement strategies     32
Scenes and music in creating involvement     42
Repetition in conversation: toward a poetics of talk     48
Theoretical implications of repetition     48
Repetition in discourse     57
Functions of repetition in conversation     58
Repetition and variation in conversation     62
Examples of functions of repetition     67
The range of repetition in a segment of conversation     78
Individual and cultural differences     84
Other genres     86
The automaticity of repetition     92
The drive to imitate     97
Conclusion     100
"Oh talking voice that is so sweet": constructing dialogue in conversation     102
Reported speech and dialogue     103
Dialogue in storytelling     105
Reported criticism in conversation     107
Reported speech is constructed dialogue     112
Constructed dialogue in a conversational narrative     120
Modern Greek stories     124
Brazilian narrative     128
Dialogue in writers' conversation     130
Conclusion     132
Imagining worlds: imagery and detail in conversation and other genres     133
The role of details and images in creating involvement     134
Details in conversation     135
Images and details in narrative     137
Nonnarrative or quasinarrative conversational discourse     141
Rapport through telling details     145
The intimacy of details     146
Spoken literary discourse     147
Written discourse     149
High-involvement writing     154
When details don't work or work for ill      156
Conclusion     159
Involvement strategies in consort: literary nonfiction and political oratory     161
Thinking with feeling     161
Literary nonfiction     162
Speaking and writing with involvement     165
Involvement in political oratory     166
Conclusion     185
Afterword: toward a humanistic linguistics     187
Sources of examples     189
Transcription conventions     193
Notes     196
List of references     211
Author index     227
Subject index     230
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