Talking Walls

( 19 )

Overview

Talking Walls introduces young readers to different cultures by exploring the stories of walls around the world and how they can separate or hold communities together. American Bookseller "Pick of the Lists; " Boston GLobe Top 25 Non-Fiction Children's Books, 1992; ALA Booklist, Starred Review; Horn Book, Noteworthy Book, 1993. Full-color illustrations.

An illustrated description of walls around the world and their significance, ...

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Overview

Talking Walls introduces young readers to different cultures by exploring the stories of walls around the world and how they can separate or hold communities together. American Bookseller "Pick of the Lists; " Boston GLobe Top 25 Non-Fiction Children's Books, 1992; ALA Booklist, Starred Review; Horn Book, Noteworthy Book, 1993. Full-color illustrations.

An illustrated description of walls around the world and their significance, from the Great Wall of China to the Berlin Wall.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Knight and O'Brien explore notable walls the world over as both symbols and vehicles for cultural connection; PW called this book ``a praiseworthy celebration of similarities and differences among the world's peoples.'' Ages 5-13. (Aug.)
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
For teachers, there is this additional guide for Talking Walls. It provides a wealth of ideas in geography, math, social studies, art, cooking, research projects, etc. for all grades through junior high. This is a wonderfully rich and challenging combination of book and guide when paired with Talking Walls.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-- A unique introduction to the history and beliefs of a diverse group of cultures. In each of the 14 double-page spreads, Knight journeys to a new location, presenting information and folklore about famous walls all over the world. Some of the choices are obvious: the Great Wall of China, the Lascaux Cave, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the Berlin Wall. Others are less traditional but imaginatively appropriate: the Mexican murals of Diego Rivera, the Canadian Museum of Civilization, Nelson Mandela's prison walls. Although each vignette is brief, the author holds readers' interest with personalized stories, such as the one of a young boy who proudly chalks his handprint next to those of his ancestors on an Aborigine cave wall, or the Jewish child who solemnly places his handwritten Hebrew prayer in a crevice of the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Additional information is provided at the back of the book, as are two simple maps and endpapers that feature the word for wall in 36 languages. Beautifully executed pastel paintings capture the variety and vitality of each culture presented. Use this to launch a discussion about the uses and abuses of boundaries, or connect it to more familiar sights such as graffiti or billboards, and talk about walls as a means of cultural expression. --Joy Fleishhacker, New York Public Library
School Library Journal
Gr 3-7-This recording of the two title books by Margy Burns Knight (Tilbury House) presents each story as a short vignette with musical accompaniment separating them. The many problems of this recording begin with the musical accompaniment. The sound quality is very uneven, ranging from a clanging gong that will jar listeners to an indistinguishable humming that causes the speakers to buzz. One of the Native American chants borrowed from another recording is well done, accenting the story authentically, but the calypso-style music, which begins the Mexican story, is not compatible with the location. The stories constitute a multicultural collection ranging from the famous--the Great Wall of China and the Wailing Wall--to the lesser-known walls of Zimbabwe and Chilean Pablo Neruda's home. These stories, while interesting and informative, are occasionally more political commentary than juvenile entertainment. The comparison between Angel Island, California and Ellis Island skews facts, giving the impression that European immigrants coming through New York easily entered the U.S. as opposed to the Chinese immigrants processed through California. Perhaps the biggest deficit of the recording is the reading itself. The slow, deliberate pace is flat and tedious, lacking in expression. Unnatural phrasing makes the stories hard to follow at times. The accent of the author/reader interferes with the pronunciation of several ethnic words and names (i.e. Ravana, Orozco, apartheid), negating the multicultural value of the tales.-Diana Baker Freeman, Hardin-Simmons University, Abilene, TX
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780884481546
  • Publisher: Tilbury House Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/28/1992
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 322,523
  • Age range: 8 - 11 Years
  • Lexile: 1150L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.47 (w) x 11.97 (h) x 0.18 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 19 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2007

    Introduce your child to many cultures through Talking Walls

    ¿People all over the world have been using and building walls for thousands of years. These walls tell many fascinating stories.¿ Margy Burns Knight tells 14 of these fascinating stories in Talking Walls. Beginning with The Great Wall of China, Margy Burns Knight takes us all over the world and gives us insight into many different cultures. Each wall is featured in a two-page spread with beautiful illustrations by Anne Sibley O¿Brien. The stories of the walls themselves never exceed three paragraphs, so you won¿t get bored reading a lot of details and facts about the walls and different cultures. Instead, you¿ll get just enough information to learn about the wall, the history behind it, and the people who built it. We also learn how walls can bring us together or keep us apart. Throw in a little folklore and you¿ve got a fascinating book that is sure to spark a lot of conversation with your kids.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2007

    Talking Walls

    I was not very interested in this book. I am not very big on history layouts without some sort of strong plot and this was one of those books that I found myself having to be forced to read. However, people who like historical outlines might really like this book because it is very historical and cultural. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner. Tilbury House Publishers, 1992. Reading Level 6.4

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    Talking Walls

    Margy Burns Knight was born and raised in Pennsylvania. She was in the Peace Corp for several years and visited many countries. She is now a teacher in Maine. Her travels to many countries while in the Peace Corp reflects in her books. She focuses on multicultural subjects in her books. One of these books is Talking Walls. I have recently been able to read this book. This book falls into the informational category. It is very informative, but I did not find it very exciting. I was really rather disappointed with the book. During my reading I found myself looking for something. I was searching for a reson to continue reading. The book was all informational and no interesting. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner. Tilbury House Publishers, 1992. Reading Level 6.4

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    Talking Walls

    ¿People all over the world have been using and building walls for thousands of years. These walls tell many fascinating stories.¿ Talking walls is a great book that familiarizes readers with different cultures. It begins with the Great Wall of China and a little history about China. ¿Some say the Great Wall was built to keep our invaders. Other say it was built to keep the Chinese at home.¿ Next it describes many of the paintings that ¿tell stories of the Aborigines¿ loves of the land and of how they and their ancestors have always taken good care of the earth.¿ The book goes onto talk about Jewish, Hindu, and Indian history, tales, and myths. The writer, Margy Burns Knight, is trying to make the point that the markings on walls tell much deeper stories than what meets the eye. Another wall mentioned in the book was the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, in Washington, D.C. This wall bears the names of numerous men who fought and died for their country. Around the wall are flowers and letters that express the feelings of the ones left behind. I would strongly recommend this enlightening book for children to read. It is very educational and interesting. Margy Burns Knight is a mother and an English-as-a-second language teacher. She was also a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria and a teacher in Switzerland. Margy Burns Knight strongly wants students to have a geographical knowledge and understanding of other cultures. This passion is what led her to write this book. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Maine: Tilbury House, 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2006

    Talking Walls

    Have you ever wondered about different cultures and their significant monuments? This significantly informational book shows the reader the importance of such monuments as the Great Wall of China, the Vietnam War Memorial Wall in Washington D.C., along with many other wonderous structures throughtout the world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    If Walls Could Talk

    ¿If walls could talk?¿ a saying so often heard but never realized until this extraordinary book about walls around the world. A collection of some of the most famous wall around the world like the Berlin Wall, the Great Wall of China, and the Mahabalipuram¿s Animal Walls in India are featured in this children¿s picture book. This book connects children with cultures all over the world. Some of the walls are memorials like the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, in Washing DC while others hold religious symbolism like the Muslim Walls in Mecca and the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Whatever the history is behind these walls it is important to expose children to this history. This is what Margy Burns Knight and Anne Sibley O¿Brien accomplish by writing and illustrating this wonderful book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Talking Walls

    This book is a very informational story about all the different walls across our world, and what they mean to each society. The story begins with the Great Wall of China, then Aborigine rock walls, Cave Walls, the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem, Vietnam Memorial Wall, and many more. With each new wall there is a beautiful illustration of it and a wonderful story to tell what that wall means to that culture. It is a very informative book that is also kid friendly, so they will enjoy the story and learns new things too. The author of this book, Margy Burns Knight was born and raised in Pennsylvania. She later moved to Maine in 1972, however. A majority of Knight¿s books concern multiculturalism. Also in her life she worked as a Peace Corp Volunteer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Informational Literature

    What would a world be without walls? Well, it wouldn¿t be a whole lot because a lot of the history of the world is represented by different walls all over the world. Walls can tell of the different cultures and of the past of the world we live in today. The Vietnam Wall, for example, is a list of all ¿the names of American men and women who were killed or are still missing as a result of the war in Vietnam.¿ Another example is the Berlin Wall. Although it is not standing anymore, the fact that it did stand tall at a time and the fact that it was torn down symbolizes what happened during the years when Germany was separated and the fact that the country of Germany has been once again reunited as one. The entire world has its own stories to tell, and the walls of the world help to tell those stories. ¿Can you imagine a world without walls?¿ Talking Walls is a very informational book for children about the significance of different walls all over the world. Different walls are important for different reasons. Some walls contain the history of different cultures of different people dating way back into history and other walls stand as monuments to either people or events in history. Through the words and the beautiful pictures in this book, the reader can get an idea of what different cultures are like, and they can learn about the significance of walls all over the world. Margy Burns Knight was born and raised in Pennsylvania. In 1972, she moved to Maine to attend Bowdoin College. She is an English-as-a-Second-Language teacher. She has served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria, and as a teacher in Switzerland. The reason that she wrote Talking Walls is that she wanted to educate students in both geography and other cultures. All of Knight¿s books have been illustrated by Anne Sibley O¿Brien. Margy Knight currently lives with her family in Winthrop, Maine. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House, Publishers, 1992. RL: Ages 8-11, Grades 3-6

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2006

    Genre-Informational

    'Can you imagine a world without walls?' Not after reading Talking Walls! This is a wonderful infomational children's book about all of the different walls of the world. If you want to learn about the different wall then read this book! This book tells how the world's history is represented on so many walls, and how they help us learn about different cultures and times. For example it tells how the Vietnam wall gives 'the names of American men and women who were killed and still missing' from that war. Mary Burns Night is originally from Pennsylvania and teaches English as a second language. Knigt, Mary Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House, 1992. 4th grade reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2006

    My Review

    ¿People all over the world have been using and building walls for thousands of years. These walls tell many fascinating stories.¿ Talking Walls is a book that spans the globe. In my opinion, the purpose of the book is to educate the reader on how different cultures display their heritage or beliefs. In Australia, Aborigine children would mark caves with their handprints. In Washington, D.C., the Vietnam Memorial serves as a homage to fallen soldiers. These are just a few of the ¿talking walls¿ that are described in this informative book. You may be familiar with some of the walls in the book, but others will be an adventure in learning. Margy Burns Knight has written a book that can take you for a trip around the world without ever having you leave the comfort of your home.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2006

    Talking Walls

    Talking Walls is a wonderful book. Have you every thought about what a wall could tell you if it talked? If you moved into a new house what kind of history could the walls tell you? Walls are a piece of history. Before there was paper, the walls became the note pads of the past. Talking Walls takes you on a journey through the past to learn about different cultures through the words and pictures that was left on the walls. ¿In June, Incas gather for a celebration at their walls in Cuzco, Peru, a city that lies high in the Andes Mountains.¿ This is a informational book. It is filled with information about cultures in a way that would interests many. I really enjoyed this book. I think it would be good for ages 8-12. This is the first book that author Margy Burns Knight wrote. She is an English-as-a-Second-Language teacher from Winthrop, Maine. She wrote this book because she felt there was a need for students to learn about geographical and cultural information. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House, 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Informational: Talking Walls

    Do walls really talk? This informational book is about different cultures, and it is written by Margy Burns Knight and illustrated by Anne Sibley O¿Brien. Margy Knight served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria, and as a teacher in Switzerland. Her concern for her students¿ need for geographical knowledge and understanding of other cultures led her to write Talking Walls. Anne O¿Brien is the author and illustrator of eight toddler board books. Her illustrations in this particular book are vibrant and colorful. Throughout this book we explore different cultures and their style of art. Each wall tells a different story. A Jewish child places his prayers in the wall¿s crevices. ¿Every day crowds of worshippers from all over the world gather at the towering structure that was once the western wall of King Solomon¿s temple.¿ The paintings on Egyptian houses tell of the personal journey to Mecca. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Maine: Tilbury House, 1992. Reading level: 2nd-5th grade

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    talking walls

    Talking Walls is a great example of the historical genre. It gives the history of many walls that have been erected in different countries. It also tells of various artworks that have been put on these walls. Each page is a reflection of history. I liked the last page that asked, ¿Do you know about other walls? Are they visible or invisible? Are they monuments? Do they tell stories? How are walls built? Do they need to stay up or come down? Do you build walls? Would you tear them down? Can you imagine a world without walls?¿ This lets the reader reflect on what they just read and it could also be used to further a lesson. Margy Burns Knight was born and raised in Pennsylvania and then moved to Maine to attend Bowdoin College. She and her family reside in Winthrop where she is an ESL teacher. Knight, Mary Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House. 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    An informational book about the significance of walls around the world

    Throughout the world and history different walls have been built. Some show significant events of tribes, while others pay remembrance to those who have died for our country. Talking Walls by Margy Burns Knight explores different parts of the world and the walls that were built. Some of the places mentioned are The Great Wall of China, the Aborigine Wall Art, the Lascaux Cave, and the Western Wall. Each place place a crucial part in history. For instance, the Wailing Wall, the author tells readers that, 'Many Jewish people lament that their temple was destroyed more than two thousand years ago. One of their prayers is that it will be rebuilt one day. The explores the different purposes of walls, good and bad, and what would happen if we removed them. Margy Burns Knight is an English-as-a-Second-Language teacher from Winthrop, Maine. Her inspiration for Talking Walls is from her Peace Corp trips around the world. These trips have driven her to writting books to teach children the need for geographical knowledge and understanding of other cultures. I really enjoyed reading this book. In school, we may have covered only one or two of the walls mentioned in the book, however, the others were unknown to me. While they may have not changed the world, they have allowed us to know about different cultures and religions. Many children may not get the chance in school to learn about some of the amazing places in the book, but with this book they will have that chance. This book is a wonderful informational piece that will open the eyes of many people to the world. The illustrations by Anne Sibley O'Brien done an amazing job depicted the places in the book. My favorite is the vetern's wall, showing everything reflections, to the sorrow that the lose of a loved one has caused. Children everywhere will be lucky to read this book. Grade Level: 4th Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House, Publishers, 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2006

    Talking Walls Review

    Informational: I did not like the book, Talking Walls. I thought it was boring and did not keep my attention. The book was just giving a list of information, but not wording it well enough to make you really want to read it. The information within the book is information that I think children should know about and learn about. It will show children that walls can stand for many different things and represent so much more, than just a wall. Margy Burns Knight is a mother and an English-as-a-Second-Language teacher from Winthrop, Maine. She served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria, and as a teacher in Switzerland. In addition to, Talking Walls, she recently produced a touring multi-media show about Cambodia with refugee students. Her concern for her students¿ need for geographical knowledge and understanding of other cultures led her to write, Talking Walls. Talking Walls, introduces young readers to different cultures by exploring walls around the world, showing the impact of walls on the people who build and are divided or unified by these partitions. ¿They soon learned that the wall paintings were created more then seventeen thousand years ago¿. This is the part of the book where four French boys discover a cave. Their teacher informs them more about the cave and purposes for it back in that time period. ¿Many of the huge murals that he painted on the walls throughout Mexico show the glorious and painful history of his country. This is the part of the book where it talks about Mexico¿s walls. They show great and terrible things that have happened there. Knight. Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House, Publishers, 1992. Grade Level: 3rd

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    Informational Review Talking Walls

    Have you ever wondered the significance of wall? This book takes you all around the world and lets tells you about many different wall in the world, like the Great Wall Of China, The Veterans Memorial Wall, and several others. She tells the significance of each of the walls. She tells facts about each wall like how it came to be. On the Veterans Memorial Wall she said that it was, ¿designed by Maya Lin, a twenty-one-year-old architect student.¿ The books author, Margy Burns Knight, was born in Pennsylvania. She then moved to Maine and went to Bowdoin College. She is now an ESL teacher in Winthrop. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner, ME: Tilbury House, 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    College Review for Class

    What would the walls around you have to say? Are there walls close to where you live that people come to look at or read what might be written on them. In this informational book about the significance of walls around the world ¿Talking Walls¿ by Margy Burns Knight it shows the different walls that have been built throughout history. Some of the places mentioned are The Great Wall of China, the Aborigine Wall Art, the Lascaux Cave, and the Western Wall. People and events from these walls play an important part in their lives. Some of the walls in this book like the Wailing Wall play in important part for the Jewish people. In the book it tells us that, many Jewish people lament that their temple was destroyed more than two thousand years ago. One of their prayers is that it will be rebuilt one day. There are many walls that have different purposes some might be for good, and others for bad, but what every the reason. These walls have a story to tell. Read more of this wonderful book and you will go to far away places. I really enjoyed reading this book and learning about the different walls all over the world. The author Mary Burns Knight was born in Pennsylvania. She then moved to Maine and went to Bowdoin College. She now is an ESL teacher in Winthrop, Maine Knight, Margy Burns. ¿Talking Walls.¿ Gardiner: Tilbury House, Publishers, 1992. Grades 3-6

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Interesting

    I do not like history but I think that this book makes certain facts in history interesting. You learn about all of the many different types of walls all over the world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2006

    Talking Walls

    Informational Non-Fiction Do want to travel the world? Read this book. ¿Talking Walls¿ is a book using walls in various cultures around the world. Some of the walls are the ¿Berlin Wall¿ and the ¿Great Wall of China¿, as jumping-off points for discussing the other cultures. The pictures are beautiful and make this book more enjoyable. Margy Burns Knight was born and raised in Pennsylvania. She moved to Maine in 1972 to attend Bowdoin College. Bibliography Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner, ME: Tilbury House, 1992.

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