Overview

Tallulah is back in ballet class and now she wants to go en pointe?to dance up on the tips of her toes in pink satin toe shoes, like a real ballerina. But going en pointe is not good for growing feet, and her ballet teacher says her feet aren't ready yet. Oh, yes, they are, Tallulah thinks. And so am I. Not only is she ready, she's determined. And nothing stops Tallulah when her mind is made up!

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Tallulah's Toe Shoes

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Overview

Tallulah is back in ballet class and now she wants to go en pointe—to dance up on the tips of her toes in pink satin toe shoes, like a real ballerina. But going en pointe is not good for growing feet, and her ballet teacher says her feet aren't ready yet. Oh, yes, they are, Tallulah thinks. And so am I. Not only is she ready, she's determined. And nothing stops Tallulah when her mind is made up!

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Tiny Tallulah is intent on become a prima ballerina—now! And, as everyone knows, real ballet stars dance en pointe, a fancy French way of saying on your tippy toes. Her dance teacher cautions Tallulah that children's feet need to grow and gain strength before they can make that leap, but our dancer-in-training just can't wait. A charming picture book for petite ballerinas.

Publishers Weekly
In Tallulah’s first outing, she was desperate for a tutu; now, like all young ballerinas, she dreams of getting her first pair of toe shoes and dancing en pointe. Trying to speed the process along, she snags a discarded pair that belonged to an older dancer, but she learns that while her determination is unwavering, her body isn’t quite ready for the challenge. As with the previous two books, Singer and Boiger deliver the story’s message with a lightness and grace befitting the subject matter, and Tallulah remains a highly empathetic heroine. Ages 4–8. Illustrator’s agent: Marcia Wernick, Wernick & Pratt. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
"Singer once again wisely presents a quandary faced by many little ballerinas and any other child who is told to postpone immediate gratification  . . . Little girls in tutus and little girls who dream big will find that Tallulah is a kindred spirit . . . A charming entry in the ongoing saga of Tallulah."
Kirkus Reviews

"As with the previous two books, Singer and Boiger deliver the story's message with a lightness and grace befitting the subject matter, and Tallulah remains a highly empathetic heroine."
Publishers Weekly

"Children who love ballet will love this one and want to read the other titles in this series."
School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Kasey Giard
Tallulah cannot wait to get her first pair of toe shoes. Ever since she performed as a village girl in the ballet recital, she has longed to dance on pointe like the beautiful Lilac Fairy. When her mother promises she'll get the shoes "someday," and her teacher says Tallulah's feet aren't ready, Tallulah feels frustrated and disappointed. While no one is looking, she snatches an old pair of toe shoes from the waste basket at the ballet studio. At home, she puts on the shoes and tries to stand on her toes. She falls and then gets and idea: she needs a prince, just like the Lilac Fairy! She calls her brother into her room and with his help, she is able to stand on pointe. Tallulah is proud and excited until her toes begin to ache. A sad Tallulah returns the shoes to the waste basket, ready to give up on ever being able to dance on pointe. The girl who played the Lilac Fairy notices Tallulah and encourages her. Maybe someday Tallulah can play the Lilac Fairy. Singer captures the magic and fun of participating in a ballet program in this story about a perky young girl. Boiger's illustrations are simply enchanting. This is the perfect book for children who hold dance in their hearts. Recommended. Reviewer: Kasey Giard
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Tallulah wants to be a real ballerina in pink-satin toe shoes, like the Lilac Fairy in her ballet school's performance of Sleeping Beauty. Both her mother and her teacher tell her gently that she is too young to dance en pointe, but the child is determined. She takes a discarded pair of toe shoes home and puts them on. Standing on her toes in front of her mirror, she realizes that she looks more like a crouching rat than a graceful dancer. She stays en pointe with her little brother's help, and her toes become painfully hot and red. That week her sadness is palpable as she walks through the park. When she puts the shoes back into the wastebasket, an older girl who danced the Lilac Fairy sees and understands. Like Tallulah, she thought she would never learn to dance on her toes, but she has. So will Tallulah in time with practice. Tallulah's Tutu (2011) and Tallulah's Solo (2012, both Clarion) also show the youngster's dreamy expectations becoming more realistic. The watercolor and gouache illustrations use a palette of soft rose, pinks, blues, and grays. Children who love ballet will love this one and want to read the other titles in this series.—Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN
Kirkus Reviews
Toe shoes are de rigueur for ballerinas, and Tallulah wants them--now! Tallulah is one determined ballet student. She wanted a tutu and got it. She wanted a starring role in a student performance and almost got it, appearing instead in the corps de ballet. Now it's toe shoes. Her teacher explains that she can wear them when her feet stop growing. This is not a sufficient deterrent, however. Tallulah sneakily retrieves a pair discarded by an older student and takes them home. Sore feet, sore toes, inability to balance and her little brother's exasperation after trying to help finally make her realize her teacher's wisdom. Singer once again wisely presents a quandary faced by many little ballerinas and any other child who is told to postpone immediate gratification. Boiger's delicate watercolors featuring bright reds and blues winningly capture Tallulah's loving family, her dramatic if unsuccessful struggle to stand on point and her surety of future success. A double-page-spread depiction of a ballet step, échappé en pointe or demi-pointe, performed respectively by an older girl and by Tallulah, makes an excellent reference point. Little girls in tutus and little girls who dream big will find that Tallulah is a kindred spirit. A glittery cover adds to the appeal. A charming entry in the ongoing saga of Tallulah. (Picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780544210714
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/1/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 949,512
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Marilyn Singer

Marilyn Singer is the author of over ninety books for children. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, and Washington, Connecticut. For more information, please visit: marilynsinger.net

Alexandra Boiger has illustrated several picture and chapter books, among them While Mama had a Quick Little Chat, Tallulah’s Tutu, and the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle books. Originally from Munich, Germany, she now lives in California. Please visit her at alexandraboiger.com.

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