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Tally of the Yes Men
     

Tally of the Yes Men

5.0 1
by Goldspot
 
In the case of some rock artists, during their formative years their musical taste is often dictated by friends or an older sibling. But in the case of Goldspot leader Siddhartha, his parents played an important role in shaping his musical vision. Up until he was 14, the only style of music that Siddhartha heard was of the Middle Eastern

Overview

In the case of some rock artists, during their formative years their musical taste is often dictated by friends or an older sibling. But in the case of Goldspot leader Siddhartha, his parents played an important role in shaping his musical vision. Up until he was 14, the only style of music that Siddhartha heard was of the Middle Eastern variety (including such artists as Kishore Kumar and Mukesh). But upon discovering such groups as R.E.M. and the Smiths via the radio, Siddhartha expanded his musical tastes, which eventually led to a musical style/approach that he deems "Bollywood." And it is this style -- an ambitious take on alt-pop -- that is on display throughout 2006's Tally of the Yes Men (whose title came from a time in Siddhartha's life when he worked at an office job). On tracks such as "Rewind," Siddhartha's vocals sound quite comparable to those of Alex Chilton (circa Big Star's first go-round), while he morphs into a Thom Yorke-like singer on "It's Getting Old," which also features some nifty Cure-like guitar parts. Goldspot's Tally of the Yes Men should appeal to fans of the more tranquil, melancholic moments of Radiohead, Jeff Buckley, and Travis.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/23/2005
Label:
Union
UPC:
0678277097025
catalogNumber:
70970

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Goldspot   Primary Artist
Jeff Peters   Bass,Guitar,Bass Guitar
Billy West   Bass,Bass Guitar
Sergio Andrade   Bass,Bass Guitar
Charlie Campagna   Bass,Bass Guitar
Arlan Schierbaum   Mellotron,chamberlain,Clavioline,Moog Bass
Ramy Antoun   Percussion,Drums,Harpsichord,Moog Bass
Mark Lewis   Drums,drum overdubs
Seth McLain   Guitar
Kimberly Aboltin   Tom-Tom
Romy Antoun   Drums,Harpsichord,Moog Synthesizer
Siddhartha   Organ,Guitar,Bass Guitar,Vocals,Xylophone

Technical Credits

Jeff Peters   Producer,Audio Production
Charlie Campagna   Guitar Overdubs
Ramy Antoun   Composer
Seth McLain   Guitar Overdubs
Siddhartha   Composer

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Tally of the Yes Men 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
"Songcraft" is a word that comes up a lot in music reviews, but it's a word I keep fixating on when thinking about Tally of the Yes Men, the terrific debut album from the L.A. band Goldspot. As with, say, the Pernice Brothers, Goldspot have a truly impressive handle on song construction, on crafting catchy melodies and setting them in the right context. Their songs communicate emotions – generally a feeling of being lost in the world ("I feel like I'm drowning this time / the world seems to laugh out loud"), sometimes coupled with the feeling of being saved, or at least the hope of being saved by someone. Yet those emotions are closely tied to the strength of the melodies you feel what they're singing and playing because of how they're doing it, not just because of the words themselves. Musically, Goldspot's streamlined, modern pop-rock could be comfortably placed somewhere along a timeline of post-The Bends alternative rock. It's not hard to hear both Thom Yorke and Jeff Buckley in lead singer Siddhartha's voice, or to hear the casual atmospherics of both Radiohead and their American contemporaries Granddaddy in Goldspot's sound, whether all of this is there intentionally or not. Yet there's also a strong influence of bands from the decade before. The Smiths, in particular, emerge here and there, most obviously on "It's Getting Old". But it's the Smiths' melodic approach that Goldspot seems to be drawing from, not Morrissey's high drama or the group's political bent. While listening to a melody as perfect as those on the catchy first track "Rewind" or the stark ballad "So Fast", you get the sense that Goldspot have spent a lot of time listening to songs by bands who fit gorgeous melodies over rock guitars, taking notes and waiting for the chance to unleash their own powerful songs on unsuspecting ears. That time is now, and Tally of the Yes Men is impressive indeed.