Tallying Reference Errors in Narratives: Integrative Language Function, Impairment, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

Overview

Many interpreters argue that Karl Barth's rejection of the Roman Catholic analogia entis (analogy of being) was based upon a mistaken interpretation of the principle, and many scholars also contend that late in his career, Barth changed his mind about the analogia entis, either by withdrawing his rejection of it or by adopting some form of it as his own. These claims supply the central questions of this dissertation: (1) Did Barth's rejection of the analogia entis result from a mistaken ...
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Overview

Many interpreters argue that Karl Barth's rejection of the Roman Catholic analogia entis (analogy of being) was based upon a mistaken interpretation of the principle, and many scholars also contend that late in his career, Barth changed his mind about the analogia entis, either by withdrawing his rejection of it or by adopting some form of it as his own. These claims supply the central questions of this dissertation: (1) Did Barth's rejection of the analogia entis result from a mistaken interpretation of the principle? and (2) Did Barth, either in response to the realization that he had made a mistake or due to changes in his own theology, withdraw his critique of the analogia entis and accept some form of it into his own theology? To address these questions, two claims are defended. First, it is argued that Barth's rejection of the analogia entis was not the result of a mistaken interpretation of the principle. That is, he understood the principle correctly---and specifically, he understood Erich Przywara's version of it correctly---and he rejected it on grounds that are coherent and justified within the context of his Reformed commitments. Second, it is argued that while Barth never withdrew his criticism of Przywara's analogia entis, he did change the nature of his response to the analogia entis in general over the course of his career. Barth did so not because he changed his mind, but because he thought the Roman Catholic formulation of the doctrine had changed, and he realized that the debate about analogy did not arrive at the heart of the differences between Protestant from Roman Catholic theology. In short, Barth did not make a mistake when he rejected the analogia entis, and he also never wavered on his critique of it; he did, however, change his response to it---not by breaking with his earlier thought, but by deepening it so that a true dialogue could take place between Protestants and Roman Catholics.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781243563880
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/3/2011
  • Pages: 140
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.30 (d)

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