The Taming of the Samurai: Honorific Individualism and the Making of Modern Japan / Edition 1

The Taming of the Samurai: Honorific Individualism and the Making of Modern Japan / Edition 1

by Eiko Ikegami
     
 

ISBN-10: 0674868099

ISBN-13: 9780674868090

Pub. Date: 03/25/1997

Publisher: Harvard

Modern Japan offers us a view of a highly developed society with its own internal logic. Eiko Ikegami makes this logic accessible to us through a sweeping investigation into the roots of Japanese organizational structures. She accomplishes this by focusing on the diverse roles that the samurai have played in Japanese history. From their rise in ancient Japan,

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Overview

Modern Japan offers us a view of a highly developed society with its own internal logic. Eiko Ikegami makes this logic accessible to us through a sweeping investigation into the roots of Japanese organizational structures. She accomplishes this by focusing on the diverse roles that the samurai have played in Japanese history. From their rise in ancient Japan, through their dominance as warrior lords in the medieval period, and their subsequent transformation to quasi-bureaucrats at the beginning of the Tokugawa era, the samurai held center stage in Japan until their abolishment after the opening up of Japan in the mid-nineteenth century.

This book demonstrates how Japan's so-called harmonious collective culture is paradoxically connected with a history of conflict. Ikegami contends that contemporary Japanese culture is based upon two remarkably complementary ingredients, honorable competition and honorable collaboration. The historical roots of this situation can be found in the process of state formation, along very different lines from that seen in Europe at around the same time. The solution that emerged out of the turbulent beginnings of the Tokugawa state was a transformation of the samurai into a hereditary class of vassal-bureaucrats, a solution that would have many unexpected ramifications for subsequent centuries.

Ikegami's approach, while sociological, draws on anthropological and historical methods to provide an answer to the question of how the Japanese managed to achieve modernity without traveling the route taken by Western countries. The result is a work of enormous depth and sensitivity that will facilitate a better understanding of, and appreciation for, Japanese society.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674868090
Publisher:
Harvard
Publication date:
03/25/1997
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
450
Sales rank:
623,420
Product dimensions:
6.37(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

IA Sociological Approach1
Introduction3
1Honor, State Formation, and Social Theories15
IIOrigins in Violence45
2The Coming of the Samurai: Violence and Culture in the Ancient World47
3Vassalage and Honor78
4The Rite of Honorable Death: Warfare and the Samurai Sensibility95
IIIDisintegration and Reorganization119
5Social Reorganization in the Late Medieval Period121
6A Society Organized for War135
IVThe Paradoxical Nature of Tokugawa State Formation149
7Tokugawa State Formation151
8An Integrated Yet Decentralized State Structure164
9The Tokugawa Neo-Feudal State: A Comparative Evaluation177
VHonor and Violence in Transformation195
10Honor or Order: The State and Samurai Self-Determinism197
11The Vendetta of the Forty-seven Samurai223
12Proceduralization of Honor241
VIHonor Polarization in Vassalic Bureaucracy265
13State-Centered Honor and Vassalic Bureaucracy267
14Hagakure: The Cult of Death and Honorific Individuality278
15Confucian and Post-Confucian Samurai299
VIIHonorific Individualism and Honorific Collectivism327
16Themes of Control and Change329
Epilogue: Honor and Identity370
Notes381
Index421
Illustration 1. A medieval samurai's compound
Illustration 2. Victorious troops after the Heiji Rebellion of 1159
Illustration 3. Kawanakajima Battle, 1561
Illustration 4. The Tokugawa shogun receiving an audience of daimyo at Edo Castle
Illustration 5. A fight between Kabuki mono, 1604
Illustration 6. Samurai during the final phase of unification, around 1600-1615
Illustration 7. Seppuku after the revenge of the Forty-seven Samurai, 1702
Illustration 8. Greetings exchanged between Tokugawa samurai, late seventeenth century
Illustrations are reproduced from the collections of Nishimura Hakubutsukan; Seikado; Tokugawa Reimeikai; Tokyo Kokuritsu Hakubutsukan; and Zenhoji

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